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23

The phrases "kingdom of God" (ἡ βασιλεία τοῦ θεοῦ) and "kingdom of Heaven" (ἡ βασιλεία τῶν οὐρανῶν) occur eighty-six (86) times in the gospels. The phrase "kingdom of Heaven" occurs thirty-two (32) times and only in the Gospel of Matthew. The phrase "kingdom of God" occurs thirty-two (32) times in the Gospel of Luke, the most of any book in the Bible. An ...


22

There's a condition known as Hematidrosis, which has reportedly occurred in people other than Jesus. It could be metaphorical, but the "easy reading" of that passage suggests it's not, and I don't know that there's any outside sources to suggest that we shouldn't take it to mean he literally sweat blood.


20

No, I don't think we are dealing with a case of "Oh, this doesn't line up with everything else Jesus said, therefore..." However, I will say we need the entirety of Luke 14 to make sense of this gnarly truth that Jesus is making. To start off, don't overlook the fact that Luke 14:26 includes more than family members - it also includes ourselves - If ...


18

The Greek word for robber in John 18:40 is λῃστής. This word is defined by Strong's Enhanced Lexicon this way: 3027 ἀρχιλῃστής, λῃστής [lestes /lace·tace/] n m. From leizomai (to plunder);15 occurrences; AV translates as “thief” 11 times, and “robber” four times. 1 a robber, plunderer, freebooter, brigand. The Greek word used as murder here is ...


16

According to the notes on the NET Bible: This is one of the hardest verses in the gospels to interpret. Various views exist for what generation means. (1) Some take it as meaning “race” and thus as an assurance that the Jewish race (nation) will not pass away. But it is very questionable that the Greek term γενεά (genea) can have this meaning. Two other ...


14

There are two possible reasons why 'they were signing' (ἐνένευον) to him in Luke 1:62: Zechariah was mute and deaf. While there is no indication that the angel Gabriel brought about anything other than muteness,1 v. 22 states that he remained κωφός, which in addition to referring to a "lack of speech capability," can also imply a "lack of hearing ...


14

The wise men came after baby Jesus was presented in the temple. If you see a harmony of the Gospels, like Study Resources :: Harmony of the Gospels, you will find that the wise men came long after Jesus was presented in the temple. Presentation in the temple A woman who bore a son was ceremonially unclean for forty days (twice that if she bore a daughter ...


13

The NET Bible includes this textual criticism note: Several important Greek mss (Ì75 א1 A B N T W 579 1071*) along with diverse and widespread versional witnesses lack 22:43-44. In addition, the verses are placed after Matt 26:39 by Ë13. Floating texts typically suggest both spuriousness and early scribal impulses to regard the verses as historically ...


13

The similar command in Matthew 10:37 shows that the ancient world understood this saying of Jesus to be not complete hatred (37 "Anyone who loves their father or mother more than me is not worthy of me; anyone who loves their son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me"). There is no reason to assume an Aramaic source for the Gospels based on this ...


12

One thing to remember here is that Luke was a physician. He knew (should have known?) his symptoms. This does not preclude the metaphoric interpretation, but it does give the literal interpretation a lot more credence in this case. Even if it was not something he had seen before, it makes it far less likely that he would describe it this way in error.


11

---- Answer just looking at Luke 14:26 ---- According to Thayler's lexicon, (as I understand (in the below scan) .. people in the culture were really much like modern Italians and Greeks, and it was common to both love and hate something at the same time, so the greek word used could be interpreted 'love less than': Also from Vine's Expository Dictionary ...


11

Was the Luke of Colossians the author of Luke/Acts? Probably. As the two volumes do not themselves include the author's name, we can't be sure that the author was named Luke at all. However, Luke is only mentioned 3 times in Paul's letters and there is no indication there that he was a particularly prominent personage. Therefore, any external evidence ...


11

While punctuation did not exist in the original manuscripts, there are good reasons for preferring in our translations the rendering, "Verily I say unto thee, today shalt thou be with me in paradise." Here are several arguments in support of this conclusion: In "I say unto thee today," the word "today" is rather superfluous. Quite clearly Jesus is talking ...


11

Popular interpretations as to what event is anticipated by "the kingdom of God" coming in power include the following: The transfiguration The resurrection The ascension The day of Pentecost The second coming A couple things stand out in the passage that are worth noting. First, Jesus has just given indication that the disciples may end up soon ...


11

If there is a contradiction at all between Paul's tradition and the tradition of the Gospel writers, it can be resolved as a text critical issue here in 1 Corinthians 11:24. Most of the early manuscripts simply have Τοῦτό μού ἐστιν τὸ σῶμα τὸ ὑπὲρ ὑμῶν - "This is my body, which is for you." The short phrase τὸ ὑπὲρ ὑμῶν also appears in 2 Corinthians 9:3, ...


11

It is very important to keep in mind that we have no manuscripts of Macion's gospel and no translations of it. Furthermore, we have no extant neutral or pro-Marcion commentaries. The two commentaries we have, by Tertullian and Epiphanius, have a strongly anti-Marcion agenda, furthermore they disagree with each other at some key points. This makes saying ...


11

OP: Is it possible, through the interpretation of scripture, to determine approximately when this event happened? Yes, I believe it is. Luke 10:18 in Greek (SBL GNT), with the New American Standard Bible, reads this way: εἶπεν δὲ αὐτοῖς· Ἐθεώρουν τὸν Σατανᾶν ὡς ἀστραπὴν ἐκ τοῦ οὐρανοῦ πεσόντα. eipen de autois, Etheōroun ton Satanan ōs astrapēn ...


10

There have been several proposed reconciliations of the Matthew and Luke genealogies. Among the popular ones are: Matthew's genealogy traces legal heirs; Luke's traces biological ancestors. Matthew's genealogy traces the ancestry of Joseph; Luke's traces the ancestry of Mary. This view takes the phrase "as was supposed of Joseph" in 3:23 as a parenthetical ...


10

Some say the "Kingdom of Heaven" refers to the a physical/political kingdom on earth while the "Kingdom of God" is the spiritual, coming reign of Christ. Arguments against the two being the same often come down to hair splitting and misinterpretation of verses. For example, the site listed above relies on a single verse in an attempt to say they are ...


10

Not all prophets have recorded prophecy It should be noted that it is possible to a prophet and not have any of your prophetic utterances recorded in scripture, for example in 1 Kings 18:4 we read "For so it was, while Jezebel massacred the prophets of the LORD, that Obadiah had taken one hundred prophets and hidden them, fifty to a cave, and had fed them ...


10

The idea of a "son" in first century Christian writings was different than it is today. The term "son" simply signified that he came from God and bore His image. (examples) Both of these things are true of Adam: Then God said, “Let Us make man in Our image, according to Our likeness . . . " God created man in His own image, in the image of God He ...


10

0) AN APOLOGY FOR THE LENGTHINESS OF THIS POST Ι realize that by apologizing for the length of this post, I'm actually making the post longer. But so be it. I tried making the post shorter without compromising the content, but was not able to. You can skip most of the verses I quote without missing much, if you want. 1) THE PHRASE "DAUGHTER OF ...


10

Historically, Luke 10.18 was often incorporated into a broader mythos concerning the fall of 'Lucifer' in prehistory. Hoppe briefly touches on this when commenting on Isaiah:1 In [Isaiah] 14:12 the prophet calls the king of Babylon the "Morning Star," which Jerome rendered into Latin as "Lucifer." Patristic and medieval interpreters, influenced by ...


9

The name “Theophilus” may indicate a primarily Gentile audience, perhaps in Rome, given its decidedly Greek nature and that Luke’s account ends with Paul’s arrival in Rome. However, Theophilus could have just as easily been a diaspora Jew living in Rome. Heinz Joachim Held takes this perspective further by hypothesizing that Luke’s intent was to reach the ...


9

"Paradise" is a transliteration of παράδεισος, a word used only three times in the New Testament. Furthermore, the context of each of the three uses is different from the others, and by three different authors. In 2 Corinthians 12:4 it appears to parallel or point to the term "third heaven" in verse 2. Since God is apparently immediately present there, ...


9

I decided to build a canonical answer to this question, since it seemed that all three answers had something to offer. Greek and Hebrew The Hebrew word yare (Strongs H3372) carries a number of meanings. There is both the definition being "terrified" or "afraid" along with the definition of having "reverence", "awe", or "respect". In Greek, the word ...


9

Their responses seem similar and I don't believe it's possible to examine the language and come with the phrasing that leads to the rebuke. His mirrors Gen 15:8 which is not received as harshly. In comparison with Mary's response while hers seems more technical ("How is this going to happen?" - which perhaps implies a belief in something supernatural ...


9

The Greek word ἀλώπηξ (alopex, fox) appears in the Septuagint (LXX) and other early literature. In western culture the word has long signified craftiness or cleverness, and this meaning had even come to be associated with the Greek word by the first century. However, it is not likely that Jesus spoke this phrase in Greek. According to the NET translators: ...


9

Summarizing Hastings Dictionary of Christ and the Gospels entry on wine bottles: In ancient Israel, the grapes were pressed in the winepress and left in the collection vats for a few days. Fermentation starts immediately on pressing, and this allows the first "tumultuous" (gassy) phase to pass. Then the must (fermenting juice) was put in clay jars to be ...


9

Zacchaeus (Luke 19:1-10) tl;dr; Analysis of the grammar indicates that Zacchaeus is on the verge of a large shift in his understanding of his place and power as well as the nature of of whom this Jesus is. Jesus, having demonstrated the capacity to know the hearts of humans, understands the eternal implications of this shift. Specific Context Jesus ...



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