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10

Identification of genre is both simple and profoundly difficult.1 "Genre", by way of definition, is the technical name given to a "literary category". (Note that "genre can be used of other creative productions, but we're interested in texts in BH.SE.) This answer has three main sections: first, on locating a given text within some genre second, on ...


9

In two of his books (listed below), John H. Walton examines Genesis 1.1-2.3 according to its similarities to other 'creation myths' in the ancient near east (ANE from here onward), verbal cues with contemporary or related Hebrew scriptures, and so on. He doesn't go much in the way of authorship or the originally intended audience, although possibilities can ...


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Apocalyptic Literature Apocalyptic literature developed as a distinctly Jewish genre. It began with them and developed with them. The Christians continued to use it. Stages of the history of Apocalyptic Literature First is the biblical stage of the genre. The first known record of apocalyptic literature is Isaiah 24:40. It then continues sporadically ...


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Not poetry, but Prologue Gordon J. Wenham notes in The Word Biblical Commentary Vol. 1: Genesis 1-15 on page 46 ...[Genesis 1:1–2:3] stands apart from the narratives that follow in style and content and makes it an overture to the whole work. On page 50 he continues: Extrabiblical creation stories from the ancient Near East are usually poetic, ...


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The Gospel of Thomas consists mostly of sayings, and it explicitly claims to be a Gospel in its first sentence. So that's pretty good evidence that something like Q would have been thought of as a gospel around the time when Thomas was written (which is sometime between the mid 1st and mid 2nd century, we don't know). On the other hand, we don't know when "...


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See this overview from jewishencyclopedia.com. The overview breaks out the Psalms into classes: Praise Elegy Didactic A more detailed analysis could probably add more classifications such as historical, epic, etc. Psalms, like Proverbs, is both an accretional work and an anthology. It is a collection by genre rather than by theme, and so, unlike a ...


5

I can't speak to Jewish interpretation, but ancient Christians would not have understood "genre" in the sense that we do today. To them, all scripture was allegorical and all scripture was historical. Jerome, in his Commentary on Jonah first reminded his readers that Jesus referred to Jonah typologically, and that this symbolism is the primary meaning of ...


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Presuppositions Reign As with any Biblical studies, presuppositions tend to rule conclusions from the data. To illustrate this, let me quote significantly from Dick Harfield's answer, as I can agree with the much of it, but with my set of presuppositions filtering the data, rather than those used there, for some of the conclusions. The Book of Job is ...


4

The Book of Job is conveyed by a third-party narrator with unlimited omniscience. This narrator knows what happens everywhere, even in heaven. He is not bound by time or space, and can even depict private conversations and events. He understands the inner feelings of characters and can explain why people do things. The knowledge of the omniscient narrator ...


4

This answer is not exclusive to the creation narrative, but here are some thoughts on how the creation narrative (and other stories in Genesis and Exodus) may fit into the broader literary context and purpose of the Pentateuch. From a broad literary perspective, the creation narrative is the first of a series of stories in the Pentateuch that lay out Israel’...


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From Wikipedia, Book of Job: The Talmudic tractate Bava Batra (15a-b) maintains that Job was written by Moses, although nowhere does it name its author. Other opinions in the Talmud ascribe it to the period of before the First Temple, the time of the patriarch Jacob, or King Ahasuerus. The Talmud cites a number of opinions about exactly when the events ...


3

Genesis is different from any other creation story in that it absolutely separates God from his creation with the introduction that 'in the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.' As far as I am aware all other creation stories consider the universe as always existing and part of God or emanations of God, or some other confused admixture but not ...


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A MEDICAL ANALOGY In medicine, doctors through the past few centuries have often noticed that some patients come in with the same or similar symptoms as each other. For instance, many patients will come in complaining of a one-sided throbbing headache which is exacerbated by light, noise, and exercise, which often occurs about once a month (sometimes more, ...


2

These sections of scripture belong to a specific genre known as Apocalypse (lit. ἀποκάλυψις: uncovering), and so should be interpreted in line with the conventions of apocalyptic literature. That's not to say that the two are always directly analogic to one another, but rather that their form and conventions will be similar. Related reading Common features ...


1

The Mirriam-Webster dictionary definition of poetry includes the following: writing that formulates a concentrated imaginative awareness of experience in language chosen and arranged to create a specific emotional response through meaning, sound, and rhythm The Old Testament books are not organized chronologically but by category. The categories are: ...


1

As the question recognises, Hebrew poetry is very different from Western poetry and thus difficult to recognise initially. We have to look for parallel ideas, rather than rhyme and rhythm. Francis S. Collins (The Language of God: A Scientist Presents Evidence for Belief, page 140) says, "There is no question that this is a powerful and poetic narrative ...


1

Introduction Genesis 1 was intended as a prologue to Genesis and as comparative polemic which relates theological truths to the audience. Prologue Gordon J. Wenham notes in The Word Biblical Commentary Vol. 1: Genesis 1-15 page 46 ...[Genesis 1:1–2:3] stands apart from the narratives that follow in style and content and makes it an overture to the ...


1

To me, in order for any book to be considered a Gospel the first thing it would have to have is the teaching of the death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus Christ since that's what the word means in the underlying NT Greek in the canonical Gospels. That is the good news after all; that Christ died, was buried, and rose again! εὐαγγέλιον (euaggelion) ...



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