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The bible was written in a time of a primarily oral culture. Repetition is often used for emphasis or to drive home a point (as Seeker of Truth mentioned), and to make things easier to remember. So important things were repeated a whole bunch of times in slightly different words to make it easier to remember. Even if you didn't remember it the first several ...


6

"Jonathan, you are shaming your own mother (i.e. violating commandment 5 of the decalogue), not that I think that she is anything but a perverse and rebellious woman (who would produce a child like you)." That is, when stating "to the shame of your mother's nakedness" Saul is speaking to Jonathan in Jonathan's frame of reference of a child to his mother, ...


3

Sergey, you ask a very valid question, especially given what is stated in Matthew 6:7 about not using meaningless repetition ( “And when you are praying, do not use meaningless repetition as the Gentiles do, for they suppose that they will be heard for their many words." Mt. 6:7, NASB). Given this teaching, we can know that the repetition in Leviticus and ...


2

To expand on Affable's answer, the entire book of Mark is one chiasmus made up of many fractally layered chiastic structures. The center of the Mark "sandwich" is: And he asked them, “But who do you say that I am?” Peter answered him, “You are the Christ.”—Mark 8:29 (ESV) The layer just outside of that center illustrates the two misconceptions ...


2

Leprosy is representative of sin, which in the Hebrew Bible made one "dirty" (unclean). For example, the "tautological" repetition of leprosy and its signs in the house formally occupied by Canaanites (in the latter half of Chapter 14), while speaking to mold or persistent mildew, may also speak to the possession of the house by unclean spirits. (Nota Bene: ...


1

The repetition of the tribal gifts at the dedication of the Tabernacle has an important purpose. As pointed out by Rav Shlomo Breur, as quoted by Rav Yisachar Frand, the Torah could have told us that "Nachshon brought these things as a gift and all the other tribes gave the same thing." But it didn't because when describing gifts it is not what was given, ...


1

Verse 5 is the King of Aram talking. It is a cliche / convention that King 'a' refers to King 'b' as 'The King of X'. Once the pattern is set, the narrative sticks with it. It has nothing to do with whether the king in question is good or bad. It is also possible that this story was once told as 'once upon a time ...' and wasn't actually tied to a ...


1

A chiasm is an ancient form of poetry, in which there is an ABA structure. Indeed, looking at, say Proverbs 31, you can find ancient examples of even more drawn out chiasms that have a parallel structure many, many layers deep. The point of the chiasm is that it accentuates the thing in the center, by both leading up to it and away. In this Mark is really ...


1

Jesus faced the same insult. John 8:48 (NASB) 48 The Jews answered and said to Him, “Do we not say rightly that You are a Samaritan and have a demon?” The charge was illegitimacy. Saul was telling Jonathan that his mother played the harlot (perverse rebellious woman who uncovered her nakedness) and the result was Jonathan, who was an illegitimate ...


1

Saul understood that David was being preferred by Israel over himself. He was concerned that he would lose his kingdom to David, which meant that Jonathan, his son, would also lose the kingdom. Jonathan did not care about any of this, since he loved David as deeply as a brother. As a result, Saul became angry with Jonathan. He thought Jonathan should have ...



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