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9

There were two thieves reviling Jesus; one then repented. John Chrysostom, who was fluent in, and therefore familiar with, the Koine Greek of the New Testament, made no mention of the use of the grammar with regard to the apparent confusion and contradiction between the gospel accounts. Instead, he noted the following - Now that you may understand ...


8

There are a couple of different ways to answer your first question. I will attempt an answer from a linguistics perspective, specifically with regards to the lexical aspect of the verb in question. The dominant perspective on lexical aspect of verb tenses for the last few decades has been Actionsart. This deals with how the verb interacts with time. ...


8

The attestation of χριστός outside of Jewish/Christian antique Greek literature is quite small. This is immediately apparent if you look at a list of all occurrences known to the Perseus corpus, as well as the citations noted in the Liddell-Scott-Jones entry. According to Walter Grundmann, writing in the Theological Dictionary of the New Testament (vol. 9, ...


7

Introductory Note "Support" would be too strong a word; rather, there is nothing in this verse that necessarily argues against "eternal conscious torment." However, "with respect to this verse alone," it obviously cannot be a lone "support" for the doctrine, since the verse does not mention eternality at all (nor does it deny such); neither does it make ...


6

Since our goal is to understand what the author of the text meant by what he wrote, it is more helpful to look at how the event is described by the author, in the text than to get hung up on semantic possibilities, ANE discoveries, or personal beliefs. The author clearly meant it to be understood as a global event. In addition to the evidence you already ...


3

There is one loose connection, which lies with parallels between the accounts of the Cyrus Cylinder and the information in the Hebrew Bible regarding the anointing of the Persian King Cyrus, who was the Lord's מָשִׁיחַ or "Meshiach" (or Χριστός, as noted in the LXX). That is, the term had significance several centuries before the writing of the Christian New ...


2

The literary device at play here is not synecdoche, but literary dependence and elaboration. When the Gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke are laid side by side and read synoptically ('with the same eye') in the original Greek language, it is clear that there is a literary dependency among them. Further study shows that Mark was the first to be written, with ...


1

Paul is not defining a cult here, he simply cannot be in the larger context. It would be eisegesis for those who say he is and not exegesis, we must let the text speak. He is clearly speaking to "the church of God, which is at Corinth" (1:2) and, if a cult, then he is saying that a cult is the church, which shatters the modern notion of it. No, he is ...



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