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The Hebrew formulation is: עֶרְוַ֥ת אֲחֽוֹת־אִמְּךָ֖ לֹ֣א תְגַלֵּ֑ה כִּֽי־שְׁאֵ֥ר אִמְּךָ֖ הִֽוא׃ (Lev 18:13, Westminster Leningrad Codex) Literally, the term גילוי עריות means "uncovering nakedness". However, this is just a euphemism for sexual relations. This can be seen from the following verses (Lev 18:20-23) and the parallel chapter (Lev ...


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'Clean' (טָהֵר) in Leviticus 16 The Hebrew verb טָהֵר / taher is used consistently throughout the Hebrew Bible in terms of cleansing or purifying, and so in the context of Leviticus 16 the stated meaning is that by performing the described ritual, the High Priest would have his sins cleansed and he would become pure. This ritual purification was required ...


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Leviticus 3 gives the details of the peace offering as it pertained to God, but not as it pertained to the priests. Leviticus 7 adds: And the priest shall burn the fat upon the altar: but the breast shall be Aaron's and his sons'. And the right shoulder shall ye give unto the priest for an heave offering of the sacrifices of your peace offerings. He ...


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She was not unclean because she had a baby. She was unclean because there was an issue of blood that came out of her when she gave birth (see Leviticus 12:7). Its the blood, not the baby, that's deemed unclean.


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E. G. Richards says in Mapping Time, page 221, that references to any sort of calendar in the books of the Old Testament originating from before the Babylonian Exile are rare. Etymologies strongly suggest that it was tied to the seasonal year with a year that began in the autumn and was thus probably lunisolar, with months intercalated from time to time. ...


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The Brown-Driver-Briggs lexicon for the word “clean” is to be morally clean or purified.[טָהֵר]. The sense is to be ceremonially clean or pure. The first time the word is used is in Genesis. It provides a good picture of how this works: So Jacob said to his household and to all who were with him, “Get rid of the foreign gods you have with you, and ...


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Leviticus 16 describes the rites of Yom Kippur (aka "The Day of Atonement"). In the first rite Aaron the high priest bathes in a Miktam making his body clean and dons linen underwear, a linen coat, linen sash and a linen turban. This was the garb of a regular priest, not the high priest. The high priest normally wore more decorative attire and an ephod "for ...


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Although Leviticus 11 https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Leviticus+11&version=NKJV does tell us what was forbidden to be eaten by the ancient people of Israel, Scripture seems to permit the usage of some of the by-products of these very things in the liturgy of the chosen people. That said, it has to be noted that the interpretation of various ...


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Clarifications The passage is not primarily referring to dedicating "oneself" (per the quote by Matthew Henry in the OPs original question), and so the musing why not just donate the money or equivalent to begin with instead of vowing oneself and then redeeming oneself is not primarily relevant (but more on that in a moment). Verse 2 makes this ...



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