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The Hebrew word was used for winged creatures that weren't insects. Applying 'modern science' to an ancient culture's classifications of the world is anachronistic. The Tyndale Bible Dictionary reads: Modern scientists classify organisms on the basis of internal and external structure, but the biblical writers generally classified organisms according to ...


11

In modern Hebrew, עטלף, the word to which I believe you are referring, indeed means bat. But Targum Yonason (I know the Hebrew, I am referring to the source material at the moment) translates that word as טרפידא in Aramaic, which, based on the roots, (to capture prey by chasing it down and ripping it apart) leans more towards a sort of owl or other bird of ...


10

The passage can be made to mean what the author wants it to mean, although the meaning produced is absurd. "For whatever reason," the author shrugs, two men who lay down in a bed that belonged to a woman should be put to death. Whatever reason, indeed! As this person correctly notes at the bottom, men were forbidden from "lying in the bed" of a woman at ...


6

It's a great question, and the truth is that the sentence is fairly ambiguous despite attempts to translate it otherwise (as in the ChaBaD translation brought in @crownjewel82's answer). Here's the verse - note that the closest we get to punctuation are the cantillation marks, which have a zaqef qaton (a minor disjunctive, like a comma or semicolon) at the ...


4

This is a seemingly unusual action by the Lord, in that Nadab and Abihu had offered incense before the Lord, without provocation from the Lord. It's important to understand that a priest acts for God on behalf of the people. Mal. 2:7, "For the priest's lips should keep knowledge, and they should seek the law at his mouth: for he is the messenger of the ...


4

וְשֶׂ֣רֶט לָנֶ֗פֶשׁ לֹ֤א תִתְּנוּ֙ בִּבְשַׂרְכֶ֔ם וּכְתֹ֣בֶת קַֽעֲקַ֔ע לֹ֥א תִתְּנ֖וּ בָּכֶ֑ם אֲנִ֖י יְהוָֽה Grammatically speaking, "the dead" isn't even mentioned in the original Hebrew text. It was simply "the soul." In Hebraic thought, the soul is the unified body and spirit. The soul can be dead, or the soul can be alive. The text doesn't say one ...


3

The translation from chabad.org makes things a bit clearer. The Hebrew text is available there as is a commentary on the text. You shall not make cuts in your flesh for a person [who died]. You shall not etch a tattoo on yourselves. I am the Lord. It's easy to see that there are two separate sentences containing two distinct commands. The first is ...


2

We find even within scripture that there existed a heathen practice of cutting the flesh as part of an attempt to appeal to the gods, a kind of unholy sacrifice if you will. So they shouted louder and slashed themselves with swords and spears, as was their custom, until their blood flowed. (NIV 1 Kings 18:28) There are other references to cuttings ...


2

What is the meaning of the bread as portrayed in Leviticus 24:5-8? What does this represent? In Judaism, God rested on the Sabbath.1 In order to observe the Sabbath, challah bread is made with three or six strands, though there seems to be no obligation to make three-strand challahs or six-strands challahs. The six-strand challah may represent a sense of ...


1

As fine as the King James Version of the Holy Bible is--and its style and sonority are indeed hard to beat, there are also many other fine translations today which provide us with alternate readings, which though perhaps not as dignified sounding as the venerable KJV, can to their credit open up new vistas of understanding for us. Since most translations are ...


1

Copied and pasted from http://www.gotquestions.org/hand-under-thigh.html The thigh was considered the source of posterity in the ancient world. Or, more properly, the “loins” or the testicles. The phrase “under the thigh” could be a euphemism for “on the loins.” There are two reasons why someone would take an oath in this manner: 1) Abraham had ...


1

Leviticus 20:27 - Why is this verse at the end of the chapter? It would appear to be a means of emphasis after all that had preceded it. Verses 1-6 address Israel as a nation in dealing with those who offer children to Molech. Verses 7 and 8 deal with national sanctification. Verses 9-21 deal with personal sins and how they are to be dealt with— a. ...


1

Vs 6 says not to talk to the mystics (without addressing being a mystic); the rest of the chapter lists other crimes against God that separate persons from God, and whose crimes threaten the sanctity of the nation if the persons aren't removed from the nation. Vs 26 is the "refrain" command to be separated from the world and holy to God. So vs 27 then seems ...


1

Literally: And direct-object male not you-shall-lie lying of-woman abomination it. “lie lying” is what in linguistics we call a figura etymologica: a verb followed by a noun from the same root. It does not work in English, but it works in Hebrew and many other languages. “Lie the lying of a woman” means “lie the way you would lie with a woman”. The KJV ...



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