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I have searched my electronic copy of Biblia Sacr JUXTA Vulgatam Clementinam and it seems in all three cases I could find, lucifer means the morning star (the planet Venus) or possibly just the day in one instance. It seems to be used as an image which suits both the Devil and Christ. It is only Capitalized as a personification in Isaiah where it seems to ...


6

A translation coming from an already translated work is called a "daughter translation." For example, the Septuagint in English is a daughter translation as it is based on the Septuagint instead of the Hebrew. English Translations that use the Vulgate Using the Vulgate as the basis for an English Bible has been done several times. The first English ...


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Augustine believed that 1) the Septuagint was superior to all other translations, including Jerome's translation of the Hebrew Bible; 2) Augustine was concerned over the unity between the Latin and the Greek churches and 3) was also concerned people might leave the church after hearing a translation that differed from that which they have been accustomed to ...


3

There is a brief but reliable account of the production of the Great Bible in S. L. Greenslade (ed.), The Cambridge History of the Bible: Volume 3, The West from the Reformation to the Present Day (Cambridge University Press, 1963), pp. 150-152.* Greenslade also wrote this chapter on English versions in the 16th C. (It's a very common work, and should be in ...


3

The Douay–Rheims Bible is a translation of the Bible from the Latin Vulgate into English made in France for the Roman Catholic Church. Various editions are freely available online in numerous places. However, many later editions are based on more on the text of King James Version than on the Vulgate. You would want to try to find an earlier edition to remain ...


2

This one is my favorite, from the Duoay-Rheims Bible (an English translation of the Vulgate): Ex 34:29-35 And when Moses came down from the mount Sinai, he held the two tables of the testimony, and he knew not that his face was horned from the conversation of the Lord. And Aaron and the children of Israel seeing the face of Moses horned, were afraid to ...


1

Let's not forget that one of the tasks of a thorough hermeneutic is to consider Jesus' original audience and how they would interpret the metaphor. His audience was not composed of plant biologists but mostly non-scientific-types who had actual experiences with growing wheat to make bread, the "staff of life" back then. Combine this piece of the ...



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