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According to many Rabbis, Meroz is a planet from which heavenly beings inhabit like the JUDGES 5:20 REFERENCES: 5:20 From the sky the stars fought. From their courses, they fought against Sisera. 5:23 'Curse Meroz,' said the angel of Yahweh. 'Curse bitterly its inhabitants, because they didn't come to help Yahweh, to help Yahweh against the ...


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The word raḥamatayim is the dual form of the word reḥem. This root literally means “womb” but can also mean “woman” for obvious reasons. So Sisera’s mother is comforting herself, saying the delay is because the soldiers are collecting slave girls: “A womb or a pair-of-wombs for every man.” But in English, this reads more naturally as “A womb or two for ...


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Dvorah is calling out all the tribes that sat on their hands and refused to fight. Each tribe sat on its hands in its characteristic way. Dan is famous for trading in ships, so they stayed by their ships. As opposed to Reuben, who more or less stayed by their sheeps. The nautical tendencies of Dan are mentioned in the old Jewish Encyclopedia. This verse is ...


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Regarding the phrase, "And YHVH said to the children of Yisra'el," Rabbi David Kimchi wrote, על ידי נביא, that is, "by the hands of a prophet" (cp. Jdg. 6:8). One should recall that the Israelites pleaded with God that He no more speak to them personally (Exo. 20:19 cp. Deut. 18:15-19). So, in particular contexts where it seems as though God is speaking to ...


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This answer quotes Rashi, who provides two explanations. The first argument seems textually thin - there are no other examples of calling someone by a tribe name based on their mother's side (see the single exception explained by the Radak, which doesn't actually attribute the tribe but describe their lineage). If anything, a simpler textual explanation is ...


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Rashi offers two explanations: of the family of Judah: And he was a Levite from his mother’s side. However, our Sages said (B.B. 109b) that since he committed deeds like those of Menasseh (i.e., he committed idolatry) who came from Judah he is called “Of the family of Judah,” but he was really a Levite the son of Gershom the son of our teacher Moses, as ...


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The word "ishah", meaning "woman, wife, female" is translated together with "naviah" (the female form of "prophet) - these two words together mean "prophetess", or, as the NASB95 notes say, "lit. woman prophetess". The difference between the second word in the verse, "ishah" (Strongs 802) and "isheh" (Strongs 801) is in the vowel points under the ...


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Marriage Prohibitions The two references you give (Dt 7:3, Ez 9:12) explicitly help answer your question (though the Ezra one is technically irrelevant since it was centuries after the time of Samson). Both passages list an explicit set of people when a slightly expanded context is shown: Deut 7:1-3 (KJV) 1When the LORD thy God shall bring thee into ...


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The story of Samson is difficult for some because he was clearly very 'fleshly' in some ways, but in reality very holy and the best example of a body Israelite in his generation. With respect to the verse in question I think this quote begins a proper sorting: Samson, in the old fleshy nature, was seeking his own self-gratification: but the higher ...


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The pun, if one is intended, is that of Gid'on (his name), and the verb gimmel-dalet-ayin, which means "breaking up". The barley loaf, as mentioned above in Eli Rosencruft's comment, ("The barley cake does not have the gluten content of wheat, so it does not stick together like wheat bread.") could break up, both itself, and break up the unity the ...


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E. W. Bullinger, an Anglican theologian from the late 18oo's, shares some insightful information regarding this question: "Did Jephtha Really Sacrifice His Daughter: an Analysis of Judges 11:31." Bullinger points out that the verse can read, "“If you deliver the Ammonites into my hands, then whatever comes out of the door of my house to meet me on my safe ...



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