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While there is nothing explicit given regarding the change, the significance appears to lie in the meanings themselves. However, this topic is possibly the most important onomastic study of all time. No exaggeration. Numbers 13:16 reads: “אֵלֶּה שְׁמֹות הָאֲנָשִׁים אֲשֶׁר־שָׁלַח מֹשֶׁה לָתוְּר אֶת־הָאָרֶץ וַיִּקְרָא מֹשֶׁה לְהֹושֵׁעַ בִּנ־נוְּן יְהֹושֻׁעַ” First, we ...


3

I believe you are missing the fact that chapters 17 through 21 of the book of Judges are out of chronological sequence. According to the time line provided at BibleHub, the incident recorded in Judges 18, concerning the Danites, happened only about 25 years after the land had been allotted to the tribes. Robert Jamieson says this: The Danites had a ...


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Did Jericho "deserve" destruction? The biblical story of the fall of Jericho in Joshua 6 offers no explanation or justification for the sack of the city and slaughter of all but a handful of its residents. Jericho was the easternmost large city north of the Dead Sea, and apparently by sole virtue of its geography it was the first of dozens of cities and ...


2

The Curse on Jericho: a Personal Theodicy? [NOTE: An earlier version of the question suggested Joshua's curse was central to the OP concern. While not directly addressing the revised question, this answer still offers helpful background.] Joshua’s curse on the rebuilder of Jericho’s fortifications is unique in the Hebrew Bible, and as the OP's question ...


2

Salmon (or Salma/Salmah) is certainly mentioned in the Old Testament as being a descendant of Judah and an ancestor of David: Nahshon was the father of Salmon, Salmon the father of Boaz - 1 Chronicles 2:11 NIV Which agrees with: ...Nahshon the father of Salmon, Salmon the father of Boaz... Ruth 4:20-21 NIV Where Matthew mentions Rahab, it is ...


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The resolution seems to be that the events described in 15:63 and 17:12 occurred chronologically after Joshua's speech in chapter 23. The evidence is in Judges. Judges 1 begins with the death of Joshua in verse 1: After the death of Joshua the Israelites consulted the LORD, asking, “Who shall be first among us to attack the Canaanites and to do battle ...


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I can't seem to locate the passage but if memory serves the Anchor Bible volume "Joshua" reported that archaeology showed that there was a wasting disease in the area. Skeletal remains were found distorted. My memory isn't what it used to be so take that with a grain of salt. However, this is held forth by others as a legitimate reason: the STDs and ...


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Joshua 21:36-37 (KJV): And out of the tribe of Reuben, Bezer with her suburbs, and Jahazah with her suburbs, Kedemoth with her suburbs, and Mephaath with her suburbs; four cities. These words do appear appear in the LXX and the Vulgate, but not in the Masoretic text of the Second Rabbinic Bible, edited by Jacob Ben Chayyim and printed by Daniel Bomberg ...


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Although one of the oldest cities in the ancient world, Jericho was not continuously occupied up until Israelite times. Ian Wilson says, in Before the Flood, pages 127-128, that Jericho's Pre-Pottery Neolithic B culture thrived on a mix of agriculture and hunting. Whether or not the neolithic people who lived in Jericho were Semitic people related to the the ...


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The point was for the Israelites to remember: even though their ancestors are long dead, there are these twelve river stones- rather large- showing that the Jordan was crossed on dry ground. Since Israel had a tendency to forget miracles as soon as they turned around this makes sense.



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