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No, the Caananites were not destroyed by the Jewish people. The cited verse in Joshua 10:40 speaks only of the completion of Joshua's campaign against the Canaanie tribes of the south. In the next chapter Joshua fights the nortthern tribes. In chapter 13, when Joshua is already too old to continue the fight, G-d tells Joshua that his job is incomplete; he ...


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We know from Joshua 7:15 that the guilty party "and all that he has" will be punished, so Achan and all his family (and their livestock) were killed. This evokes the memory of Korach, leader of the rebellion against Moshe and Aharon; when he and the other rebels were killed (by the earth swallowing them up) their families were also killed (Num 16:33). But ...


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Frank's textual answer seems very tenuous to me. Verb-subject disagreement is far more prevalent than the form here (inconsistent numeration within the same verse when referring to the same subject). So it seems irrelevant to invoke that to justify this construct. Moreover, verb-subject disagreement has literary function (emphasis) which is sorely lacking ...


3

Hebrew in other places will use the singular when there is a group acting as one or being acted upon as one. From that, I would understand the "he" used in the first part to be "a group referred to in the singular." After that, the writer used the plural. I answered a similar question about subject-verb agreement previously. Short answer, a reader would ...


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The salvation of Rahab takes place in a way parallel to the original Passover. While I would not argue on the basis of Passover being "recent," 40 years is not significant, given the fact that biblical typology pops up again and again hundreds of years apart. The important thing is what the parallels are. Factors in the story of Rahab: 1) hang a scarlet ...


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Simple answer: Achan had hidden buried the items in his tent. It is unlikely that his children, who would have lived in the same tent, would have been ignorant of his sin, and they were therefore also culpable. We do know that the children were not killed innocently based on the sins of the father, as Joshua would have known the unequivocal prohibition in ...


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Possible Parallels A number of commentators seem to consider the possibility that Luke deduces parallels between the two events. Among those who see some link are Bruce (NICNT), Longnecker (EBC), Polhill (NAC), and Witherington (SRC). F.F. Bruce writes: The story of Ananias is to the book of Acts what the story of Achan is to the book of Joshua. In both ...


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The aggadic interpretation shared by many Jewish commentators is that the basis for the name change is that Moses prayed for Joshua. Indeed Rashi explains that he prays he be saved from the counsel of the spies. Why he didn't pray for Caleb as well is a question many commentators who take this line have great difficulty understanding (see the Kli Yakar). ...


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הוֹשֵׁעַ means "saves", while יְהוֹשֻׁעַ means "God saves". Rashi explains: And Moses called Hoshea…: He prayed on his behalf, “May God save you from the counsel of the spies.” [The name יְהוֹשֻׁעַ is a compounded form of יָהּ יוֹשִׁיעֲךָ, May God save you.]- [Sotah 34b] Sotah 34b (in the Babylonian talmud) relates the following (Soncino translation): ...


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The Hebrew in verses 5 and 20 usually translated 'fell down flat' is literally 'fell under itself' or 'fell in it`s place'1. The only textual clues are that the event correlated (as promised in v5) with the 'great shout' the people shouted, though most translations don't imply causality the way the KJV seems to. The archeological evidence points to a ...


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A great resource to use for these kinds of endeavors is BlueLetterBible.org. Here is the entry for Beit Aven (H1007) Beth-aven = "house of vanity" and the entry for אָוֶן aven (205): From an unused root perhaps meaning properly, to pant (hence, to exert oneself, usually in vain. Outline of Biblical Usage trouble, wickedness, sorrow ...


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Sometimes what is not mentioned in the Hebrew text is just as important as what is mentioned. The home of Rahab the harlot was collocated in the wall of Jericho (Josh 2:15), and her home also opened to the top of the city wall, where she had hid the spies (Josh 2:8). The spies commanded her to stay in her home when the conquest of the city was to occur ...


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I agree that there is little in the text to answer your question. There are some clues however. The name Rahab is not Canaanite but Hebrew and is possibly a nickname meaning 'wide' or 'broad'. Salmon means 'he kept his clothes on'. Possibly another nickname. That tells its own story. Rahab ran what was a common facility in Canaan and across the Middle East. ...



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