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8

Probably not. The word used for Rahab in Joshua 2 is zanah <02181>. According to Wikipedia: The Hebrew Bible uses two different words for prostitute, zonah (זנה)‎ and kedeshah (קדשה)‎. The word zonah simply meant an ordinary prostitute or loose woman. But the word kedeshah literally means "consecrated (feminine form)", from the Semitic root q-d-sh ...


6

No, the Caananites were not destroyed by the Jewish people. The cited verse in Joshua 10:40 speaks only of the completion of Joshua's campaign against the Canaanie tribes of the south. In the next chapter Joshua fights the nortthern tribes. In chapter 13, when Joshua is already too old to continue the fight, G-d tells Joshua that his job is incomplete; he ...


5

The salvation of Rahab takes place in a way parallel to the original Passover. While I would not argue on the basis of Passover being "recent," 40 years is not significant, given the fact that biblical typology pops up again and again hundreds of years apart. The important thing is what the parallels are. Factors in the story of Rahab: 1) hang a scarlet ...


5

Rahab's house was part of the wall, at least high enough to require a rope to let the spies down to the ground: 15Then she let them down by a rope through the window, for her house was built into the city wall, so that she lived in the wall. The spies particularly ask that the cord be tied in the window they escaped through, in other words visible from ...


4

While there is nothing explicit given regarding the change, the significance appears to lie in the meanings themselves. However, this topic is possibly the most important onomastic study of all time. No exaggeration. Numbers 13:16 reads: “אֵלֶּה שְׁמֹות הָאֲנָשִׁים אֲשֶׁר־שָׁלַח מֹשֶׁה לָתוְּר אֶת־הָאָרֶץ וַיִּקְרָא מֹשֶׁה לְהֹושֵׁעַ בִּנ־נוְּן יְהֹושֻׁעַ” First, we ...


4

I just came across your question and am surprised that no one has attempted to answer it yet. I am by no means a scholar of the Hebrew scriptures, but I would like to offer some thoughts. First, your astute observations underscore an intriguing theme that appears often in the historical books of the Tanakh: the appearance of a figure who is described with ...


4

Possible Parallels A number of commentators seem to consider the possibility that Luke deduces parallels between the two events. Among those who see some link are Bruce (NICNT), Longnecker (EBC), Polhill (NAC), and Witherington (SRC). F.F. Bruce writes: The story of Ananias is to the book of Acts what the story of Achan is to the book of Joshua. In both ...


4

The aggadic interpretation shared by many Jewish commentators is that the basis for the name change is that Moses prayed for Joshua. Indeed Rashi explains that he prays he be saved from the counsel of the spies. Why he didn't pray for Caleb as well is a question many commentators who take this line have great difficulty understanding (see the Kli Yakar). ...


3

In ancient mythology we see a natural meaning of the color red that would surprise nobody. Historically red often represented violence from blood, or life in blood (i.e. punishment for sin in the life of another). For example, Sekhmet was a warrior goddess in ancient Egypt: She was envisioned as a fierce lioness, and in art, was depicted as such, or as ...


3

Frank's textual answer seems very tenuous to me. Verb-subject disagreement is far more prevalent than the form here (inconsistent numeration within the same verse when referring to the same subject). So it seems irrelevant to invoke that to justify this construct. Moreover, verb-subject disagreement has literary function (emphasis) which is sorely lacking ...


3

Hebrew in other places will use the singular when there is a group acting as one or being acted upon as one. From that, I would understand the "he" used in the first part to be "a group referred to in the singular." After that, the writer used the plural. I answered a similar question about subject-verb agreement previously. Short answer, a reader would ...


3

I think this is a superb answer so I do not intent to supplant it, but perhaps supplement. Rahab has a couple of notable mentions in the New Testament: Hebrews 11 (which you've identified) and James 2. James 2 is almost more shocking than Hebrews 11 since she's held on par with Abraham as an example of saving faith. Looking back at the actual story in ...


3

I believe you are missing the fact that chapters 17 through 21 of the book of Judges are out of chronological sequence. According to the time line provided at BibleHub, the incident recorded in Judges 18, concerning the Danites, happened only about 25 years after the land had been allotted to the tribes. Robert Jamieson says this: The Danites had a ...


2

The Hebrew in verses 5 and 20 usually translated 'fell down flat' is literally 'fell under itself' or 'fell in it`s place'1. The only textual clues are that the event correlated (as promised in v5) with the 'great shout' the people shouted, though most translations don't imply causality the way the KJV seems to. The archeological evidence points to a ...


2

Simple answer: Achan had hidden buried the items in his tent. It is unlikely that his children, who would have lived in the same tent, would have been ignorant of his sin, and they were therefore also culpable. We do know that the children were not killed innocently based on the sins of the father, as Joshua would have known the unequivocal prohibition in ...


2

Non place uses: Bamidbar 23:21 Shmuel I 15:23 Yeshayahu 1:13 Yeshayahu 29:20 Yeshayahu 31:2 Yeshayahu 32:6 Yeshayahu 55:7 Yeshayahu 59 (three uses in 4,6 and 7) Yechezkel 11:2 Hoshea 6:8


2

The phrase חֶרְפֵת מִצְרַיִם refers generally to the fact that some Jews up until that point had retained some Egyptian customs (see Ralbag to Joshua 5:9), but more specifically, it refers to the shame of the Israelites for having gone 40 years in the desert without having performed circumcision on the males, young and old. The mass circumcision that took ...


2

The resolution seems to be that the events described in 15:63 and 17:12 occurred chronologically after Joshua's speech in chapter 23. The evidence is in Judges. Judges 1 begins with the death of Joshua in verse 1: After the death of Joshua the Israelites consulted the LORD, asking, “Who shall be first among us to attack the Canaanites and to do battle ...


2

The Curse on Jericho: a Personal Theodicy? [NOTE: An earlier version of the question suggested Joshua's curse was central to the OP concern. While not directly addressing the revised question, this answer still offers helpful background.] Joshua’s curse on the rebuilder of Jericho’s fortifications is unique in the Hebrew Bible, and as the OP's question ...


2

Did Jericho "deserve" destruction? The biblical story of the fall of Jericho in Joshua 6 offers no explanation or justification for the sack of the city and slaughter of all but a handful of its residents. Jericho was the easternmost large city north of the Dead Sea, and apparently by sole virtue of its geography it was the first of dozens of cities and ...


2

Salmon (or Salma/Salmah) is certainly mentioned in the Old Testament as being a descendant of Judah and an ancestor of David: Nahshon was the father of Salmon, Salmon the father of Boaz - 1 Chronicles 2:11 NIV Which agrees with: ...Nahshon the father of Salmon, Salmon the father of Boaz... Ruth 4:20-21 NIV Where Matthew mentions Rahab, it is ...


1

The point was for the Israelites to remember: even though their ancestors are long dead, there are these twelve river stones- rather large- showing that the Jordan was crossed on dry ground. Since Israel had a tendency to forget miracles as soon as they turned around this makes sense.


1

Although one of the oldest cities in the ancient world, Jericho was not continuously occupied up until Israelite times. Ian Wilson says, in Before the Flood, pages 127-128, that Jericho's Pre-Pottery Neolithic B culture thrived on a mix of agriculture and hunting. Whether or not the neolithic people who lived in Jericho were Semitic people related to the the ...


1

The captain of the Lord's host or captain of the host of the Lord is none other than the pre-incarnate Christ. The pre-incarnate Christ also appears in the old testament as one called the "Angel of the Lord." In either case inwhich he is referred, he has the divine authority to receive worship: "...but as captain of the host of the Lord am I now come. And ...


1

During the forty year wilderness wanderings, the Israelites who escaped Egypt were disobedient and therefore refused to circumcise their children (Joshua 5:5-6). After these children (the second generation of Israelites) finally crossed the Jordan River with Joshua, they "caused twelve stones to carry over" (literal rendering of the Hiphil causative of ...


1

Genocide as word was not coined until 1944. But there is certainly evidence of God commanding the annihilation of an entire people, namely, the Canaanites. The Canaanites against whom Israel waged war were under judicial sentence of death by God. They were spiritually and morally degenerate. Virtually every kind of perversion was a religious act: and large ...


1

I am not certain if you mean "Genocide, as in Ethnic Cleansing," or "Genocide, as in Large Scale Slaughter." 1 Samuel 15: Then Samuel said to Saul, “The Lord sent me to anoint you as king over His people, over Israel; now therefore, listen to the words of the Lord. 2 Thus says the Lord of hosts, ‘I will punish Amalek for what he did to Israel, how he set ...


1

Jacob blesses his sons in Genesis 49. The two who got the best blessings were Joseph and Judah. Recall that Joseph had been Jacob's favorite. Also, Joseph saved them all. Judah was the fourth oldest, but Reuben, Simeon, and Levi had all made Jacob mad. Reuben slept with Jacob's concubine (Genesis 35:22). Simeon and Levi exterminated a city and were a ...


1

A great resource to use for these kinds of endeavors is BlueLetterBible.org. Here is the entry for Beit Aven (H1007) Beth-aven = "house of vanity" and the entry for אָוֶן aven (205): From an unused root perhaps meaning properly, to pant (hence, to exert oneself, usually in vain. Outline of Biblical Usage trouble, wickedness, sorrow ...



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