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8

Probably not. The word used for Rahab in Joshua 2 is zanah <02181>. According to Wikipedia: The Hebrew Bible uses two different words for prostitute, zonah (זנה)‎ and kedeshah (קדשה)‎. The word zonah simply meant an ordinary prostitute or loose woman. But the word kedeshah literally means "consecrated (feminine form)", from the Semitic root q-d-sh ...


6

No, the Caananites were not destroyed by the Jewish people. The cited verse in Joshua 10:40 speaks only of the completion of Joshua's campaign against the Canaanie tribes of the south. In the next chapter Joshua fights the nortthern tribes. In chapter 13, when Joshua is already too old to continue the fight, G-d tells Joshua that his job is incomplete; he ...


5

Let us consider first the merits of Rachab: She was an outsider, a non-Jew, yet she recognized the God of Israel as true. It's hard enough for members of a community to act on their faith sometimes, and yet she did it from outside, without any of the usual societal support. And aligning with the people of Israel due to faith in God is quite novel at this ...


4

I just came across your question and am surprised that no one has attempted to answer it yet. I am by no means a scholar of the Hebrew scriptures, but I would like to offer some thoughts. First, your astute observations underscore an intriguing theme that appears often in the historical books of the Tanakh: the appearance of a figure who is described with ...


4

Rahab's house was part of the wall, at least high enough to require a rope to let the spies down to the ground: 15Then she let them down by a rope through the window, for her house was built into the city wall, so that she lived in the wall. The spies particularly ask that the cord be tied in the window they escaped through, in other words visible from ...


4

Well, the simplest answer is that the cord that happened to be sitting around her living space was, indeed, red. This is not a wealthy person who has a closet full of cords in different colors lying about. The ancient world did not have aniline dyes; they could not produce a complete rainbow of possible colors. There was blue from shellfish -- very special ...


3

In ancient mythology we see a natural meaning of the color red that would surprise nobody. Historically red often represented violence from blood, or life in blood (i.e. punishment for sin in the life of another). For example, Sekhmet was a warrior goddess in ancient Egypt: She was envisioned as a fierce lioness, and in art, was depicted as such, or as ...


3

Compare also with: Korach's rebellion in the book of Numbers, which led to his whole family being killed, and Haman's ten sons who were hanged along with him in the book of Esther (not by God or a rabbinic court, but tradition seems to approve). It seems like transgressions that threaten the whole community, as all three of these did, have more-dire ...


3

The salvation of Rahab takes place in a way parallel to the original Passover. While I would not argue on the basis of Passover being "recent," 40 years is not significant, given the fact that biblical typology pops up again and again hundreds of years apart. The important thing is what the parallels are. Factors in the story of Rahab: 1) hang a scarlet ...


3

I think this is a superb answer so I do not intent to supplant it, but perhaps supplement. Rahab has a couple of notable mentions in the New Testament: Hebrews 11 (which you've identified) and James 2. James 2 is almost more shocking than Hebrews 11 since she's held on par with Abraham as an example of saving faith. Looking back at the actual story in ...


3

We know from Joshua 7:15 that the guilty party "and all that he has" will be punished, so Achan and all his family (and their livestock) were killed. This evokes the memory of Korach, leader of the rebellion against Moshe and Aharon; when he and the other rebels were killed (by the earth swallowing them up) their families were also killed (Num 16:33). But ...


3

Frank's textual answer seems very tenuous to me. Verb-subject disagreement is far more prevalent than the form here (inconsistent numeration within the same verse when referring to the same subject). So it seems irrelevant to invoke that to justify this construct. Moreover, verb-subject disagreement has literary function (emphasis) which is sorely lacking ...


3

Hebrew in other places will use the singular when there is a group acting as one or being acted upon as one. From that, I would understand the "he" used in the first part to be "a group referred to in the singular." After that, the writer used the plural. I answered a similar question about subject-verb agreement previously. Short answer, a reader would ...


2

Possible Parallels A number of commentators seem to consider the possibility that Luke deduces parallels between the two events. Among those who see some link are Bruce (NICNT), Longnecker (EBC), Polhill (NAC), and Witherington (SRC). F.F. Bruce writes: The story of Ananias is to the book of Acts what the story of Achan is to the book of Joshua. In both ...


2

The aggadic interpretation shared by many Jewish commentators is that the basis for the name change is that Moses prayed for Joshua. Indeed Rashi explains that he prays he be saved from the counsel of the spies. Why he didn't pray for Caleb as well is a question many commentators who take this line have great difficulty understanding (see the Kli Yakar). ...


2

הוֹשֵׁעַ means "saves", while יְהוֹשֻׁעַ means "God saves". Rashi explains: And Moses called Hoshea…: He prayed on his behalf, “May God save you from the counsel of the spies.” [The name יְהוֹשֻׁעַ is a compounded form of יָהּ יוֹשִׁיעֲךָ, May God save you.]- [Sotah 34b] Sotah 34b (in the Babylonian talmud) relates the following (Soncino translation): ...


2

Simple answer: Achan had hidden buried the items in his tent. It is unlikely that his children, who would have lived in the same tent, would have been ignorant of his sin, and they were therefore also culpable. We do know that the children were not killed innocently based on the sins of the father, as Joshua would have known the unequivocal prohibition in ...


2

Non place uses: Bamidbar 23:21 Shmuel I 15:23 Yeshayahu 1:13 Yeshayahu 29:20 Yeshayahu 31:2 Yeshayahu 32:6 Yeshayahu 55:7 Yeshayahu 59 (three uses in 4,6 and 7) Yechezkel 11:2 Hoshea 6:8


2

The Hebrew in verses 5 and 20 usually translated 'fell down flat' is literally 'fell under itself' or 'fell in it`s place'1. The only textual clues are that the event correlated (as promised in v5) with the 'great shout' the people shouted, though most translations don't imply causality the way the KJV seems to. The archeological evidence points to a ...


1

I agree that there is little in the text to answer your question. There are some clues however. The name Rahab is not Canaanite but Hebrew and is possibly a nickname meaning 'wide' or 'broad'. Salmon means 'he kept his clothes on'. Possibly another nickname. That tells its own story. Rahab ran what was a common facility in Canaan and across the Middle East. ...


1

A great resource to use for these kinds of endeavors is BlueLetterBible.org. Here is the entry for Beit Aven (H1007) Beth-aven = "house of vanity" and the entry for אָוֶן aven (205): From an unused root perhaps meaning properly, to pant (hence, to exert oneself, usually in vain. Outline of Biblical Usage trouble, wickedness, sorrow ...


1

Jacob blesses his sons in Genesis 49. The two who got the best blessings were Joseph and Judah. Recall that Joseph had been Jacob's favorite. Also, Joseph saved them all. Judah was the fourth oldest, but Reuben, Simeon, and Levi had all made Jacob mad. Reuben slept with Jacob's concubine (Genesis 35:22). Simeon and Levi exterminated a city and were a ...


1

Sometimes what is not mentioned in the Hebrew text is just as important as what is mentioned. The home of Rahab the harlot was collocated in the wall of Jericho (Josh 2:15), and her home also opened to the top of the city wall, where she had hid the spies (Josh 2:8). The spies commanded her to stay in her home when the conquest of the city was to occur ...


1

Gaal the son of Ebal had compared Abimelech with feckless Shechem, the son of Hamor the Hivite (compare Judges 9:28 with Genesis 34:2). To offer a better alternative to the men of the town of Shechem, Gaal the son of Ebal compared himself with Hamor the Hivite, who of course was the father of feckless Shechem. (Feckless Shechem ended up destroying his family ...


1

The God of the Bible is covenantal in nature. He deals with nations, towns, families and sometimes with individuals. As Western believers we have a view of God as only dealing with individuals however he often places his mercy or judgment on larger groups. Think for example of the Canaanites. Was each individual so wicked that they needed to be ...


1

In the Hebrew Bible, this person represents the "hornet" that is identified in Joshua 24:11-12, which correlates back to Deuteronomy 7:20. (The Hebrew noun is צִרְעָה, and is a collective noun with no plural form -- so while "hornet" or "hornets" appear in the various English translations, the word is a singular noun which includes the collective meaning in ...



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