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I can't speak to Jewish interpretation, but ancient Christians would not have understood "genre" in the sense that we do today. To them, all scripture was allegorical and all scripture was historical. Jerome, in his Commentary on Jonah first reminded his readers that Jesus referred to Jonah typologically, and that this symbolism is the primary meaning of ...


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Inside the belly of the whale, Jonah said a prayer. The prayer includes this line: Jonah 2:7 (NIV) When my life was ebbing away, I remembered you, LORD, and my prayer rose to you, to your holy temple. It seems that Jonah was either expecting to die or was actually dieing. Verse 2:6 shows that Jonah believed he was being saved (which he ...


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The sea as a metaphor for death is rather common. This was true in the Hebrew mind and others (think the gods of the underworld and how closely related they were to Poseidon) When Jonah was tossed into the sea, he was given up for dead. In the belley of the whale, he was, to all outside appearances, dead and gone. Even from Jonah's prayer, we get the sense ...


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Nahum takes place about 140 years after Jonah. Jonah preached, they repented, they later returned to wickedness, and Nahum prophesied judgement. Ironically, Nahum means "comfort." Jonah shows a 7-8th century BC background (though some argue the current form came much later, around the 4th century BC). And 2 Kings 14:25 mentions a prophet named Jonah son ...


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In Jonah 3:4-4:4, Jonah preaches to the Ninevites and they repent. God then relents and has mercy on them. Jonah is furious, and in 4:2 reveals his actual reason for not wanting to come to Ninevah: And he prayed to the Lord and said, “O Lord, is not this what I said when I was yet in my country? That is why I made haste to flee to Tarshish; for I ...


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Excellent question. Strong has good references: אני ,אנכי. Gesenius discusses this here at the beginning and in the footnotes. It appears that אנכי is the more "original", and אני is a derived, localised form, based both on comparison to other languages, and the fact that אנכי is more common in earlier texts, and becomes less so in later texts. ...


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The text appears to indicate that Yona physically died at the point that the great fish swallowed him. Yona indicates that he cried from the depths of "Sheol" (Jonah 2:2). That is, he appears to have been not only in the sea, but also "in the belly of the earth" (Matthew 12:40). Yona indicates that he had descended not to the depths of the sea, but to the ...


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I think if Jonah at at that point had acquiesced, he would have called out to God for mercy instead of asking to be tossed overboard and hoping for a miracle. (I don't know if this was part of Jewish thinking in Jonah's time, but later the rabbis declared that we should not rely on miracles, Elijah and the priests of Ba'al notwithstanding.) So the straight ...


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First, I think it obvious that Jonah did not put this prayer to paper inside the leviathan, but wrote these words sometime later. Second, it isn't obvious who the author of the book itself is. Perhaps Jonah himself wrote it, but we really don't know. Third, it's unavoidable to notice that the book includes details that smack of hyperbole1: Jonah ...


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At the time, Jonah was trying to escape being obedient to the command of God which was to extend His mercy outside of the boundaries of Israel. Of all the places God could show mercy, from the perspective a Israelite of Jonah's time, Nineveh and the Assyrian kings who lived there deserved it the least. That is why Jonah ran away from God's commands: He ...


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Jonah didn't die: When Jonah was thrown out of the boat: Jonah was still alive. When Jonah was in the fish belly: Jonah was still alive. When Jonah was praying to God in the belly: Jonah was still alive (he was crying too while he was praying). When the fish vomits him out: Jonah was still alive (because he has to go to Nineveh for preaching). Matthew ...



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