Tag Info

New answers tagged

3

It seems that the Romans initially allowed the Jewish authorities to exercise capital punishment, but withdrew the privilege some time during Jesus' life. The historian Josephus writes of an instance in which stonings occurred, probably around the year 62 CE. The short version is as follows: The Roman prefect of Judæa, a man named Porcius Festus, died ...


0

Jesus is referring to when he multiplied the bread and fish in John 6:1-14. He is making commentary on the fact that people are seeking him in order to receive more food rather than observing the signs that confirm his being the Messiah, the latter being that which they ought to be doing. Let's take a look at the context of John 6:26. [25] When they ...


0

I believe that the "night" that Jesus refers to is the time of the final bowl judgements of Revelation that immediately precede his second coming. It is important to note that at the time of his return, normal human activity continues ie sharing a bed, grinding corn, marrying and being given in marriage etc. His return precipitates a separation of ...


3

The night is death. Work refers to serving God and doing good works. Jesus, in this passage, senses his own coming death. In the verse after, John 9:5, Jesus says that he is the light of the world as long as he is in the world. Therefore, when he leaves the world (in the sense of his death and ascension), day becomes night. John 6:29 mentions a single ...


5

Commentators generally see this as a reference to the Mosaic laws forbidding blasphemy. For example, Barnes' Notes, the Pulpit Commentary, the Cambridge Bible and Ellicott's Commentary see it this way. Whoever blasphemes the name of the LORD shall surely be put to death. All the congregation shall stone him. The sojourner as well as the native, when he ...


0

Harmonizing John 1, Mark 1, Matthew 4:19, and Luke 5:1-11 All of these passages speak about a call of Peter. But only Mark and Matthew recall the same event. The order in chronology is John, Mark and Matthew, Luke. JESUS MEETS PETER In John 1, Jesus in introduced to Peter by Andrew. Andrew was following Jesus since the previous day based on his former ...


0

The phrase appears to be correctly rendered in all of the above translations that you have listed. For example, Young's Literal Translation renders John 3:16 thus:"for God did so love the world, that His Son -- the only begotten -- He gave, that every one who is believing in him may not perish, but may have life age-during" That God the Father 'gave' ...


5

No, John 14:16 cannot be used to "cancel" the Trinity and posit a Quaternity (or whatever), and specifically not "Spirits" of past and present. In the understanding of later Christian tradition, the Christian Bible depicts God as outside time in any case: see, e.g. Psalm 90:2 or 1 Timothy 1:17. That is why the "past" and "present" Spirits are nonsensical. ...


0

The symbolic language Jesus used in John 6:53 strongly points to Leviticus 17:10-11. Lev 17:10 “‘Any man of the house of Israel, or of the strangers who live as foreigners among them, who eats any kind of blood, I will set my face against that soul who eats blood, and will cut him off from among his people. Lev 17:11 For the life of the flesh is in the ...


0

The Greek tenses apropos the Passover, are Present - here the idea of a repeated act act consonant with repeating weekly. The Greek tenses in Jhn.6 are aorist, consonant with one-off action. Also 'flesh' (Jhn.6: Gk. sarx) does not equal 'body' (Mt.26: Gk. sōma). Jhn.6 carries the idea of one-off conversion to messiah; the Passover passages (Synoptics + ...


-1

The Greek MSS Papyrii 66, 75, Aleph, B all omit "his." The addition of the pronoun "his" in John 3:16 is moot indeed and hence, a literal translation might be way better due to its being faithful to the Greek text: Westcott and Hort 1881 Οὕτως γὰρ ἠγάπησεν ὁ θεὸς τὸν κόσμον ὥστε τὸν υἱὸν τὸν μονογενῆ ἔδωκεν, ἵνα πᾶς ὁ πιστεύων εἰς αὐτὸν μὴ ...


0

The most common interpretation I have read is that: He that is born of human nature is entirely of that nature, body, soul and spirit is of a 'fleshly' or 'sinful' nature. Therefore anyone of mere natural birth is sinful entirely and can't even see God's Kingdom let alone enter into it. He that is born of the Spirit of God is born with a heaven or spiritual ...



Top 50 recent answers are included