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The most common interpretation I have read is that: He that is born of human nature is entirely of that nature, body, soul and spirit is of a 'fleshly' or 'sinful' nature. Therefore anyone of mere natural birth is sinful entirely and can't even see God's Kingdom let alone enter into it. He that is born of the Spirit of God is born with a heaven or spiritual ...


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The Romans usually only crucified insurrectionists. That is, people who had an agenda to harm their empire. "Thief" or "robber", therefore, is unfortunate language as we interpret that in our culture as someone who steals. But, Barabbas and those crucified alongside Jesus were more likely thought of by the Romans as Terrorists. What we know historically, ...


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Since Jesus will later make a statement about what does represent His blood: For this is My blood of the new covenant, which is shed for many for the remission of sins. (Matthew 26:28 NKJV also Mark 14:24 and 1 Corinthians 11:25) I do not think the water at the wedding represents the blood of Jesus. However, there is a great deal of symbolism present. ...


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There isn't much deep meaning here beyond "with". The combination "εἰμί...πρός" appears in plenty of other places meaning simply "to be...with", especially when people are both the subject and object. A few from the NT for flavor: Mark 14:49 Every day I was with you in the temple teaching... Luke 9:41 And Jesus answered and said, “You unbelieving ...


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Spirit (i.e., spirit, with a lower-case S) is that invisible aspect of human life. In Scripture, the metaphors of wind and breath are employed to emphasize this invisible yet essential aspect of what it means to be a human being. "Then the LORD God formed man of dust from the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a ...


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Using Logos Bible software, there appear to be 21 instances of the prepositional phrase "πρὸς [τὸν] θεόν" in the New Testament (NA28). In each instance, the idea appears to relate to the presence of God (in either an indirect or direct way depending on the context). For example, in the case of John 1:1, the λόγος would be in the direct presence of God ...


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Good question. Strictly speaking, we don't know how commonly held the belief was (as we do not have a huge number of documents from that exact time period, and certainly "opinion surveys" didn't exist then). However, the IVP Commentary does a good job of explaining the probable background based on rabbinic comments from the following centuries. I will ...


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Let's simplify things and let the Bible interpret itself: After this I looked, and, behold, a door was opened in heaven: and the first voice which I heard was as it were of a trumpet talking with me; which said, Come up hither, and I will shew thee things which must be hereafter. And immediately I was in the spirit: and, behold, a throne was set in heaven, ...


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I emailed the Lockman Foundation regarding this question, and their editorial department responded, saying essentially: The simplest way to translate 4:1 is "the first voice which I heard" (not "had heard"). If "I heard" is the translation, it could theoretically be understood as not referring to 1:10-11. The translators thought that John was most likely ...


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The Greek word ὥρα (without the definite article) appears a third time in the chapter. John 5:35 (NASB) 35 He was the lamp that was burning and was shining and you were willing to rejoice for a while in his light. John the Baptist is in view, and the duration of time in this context is for a while (πρὸς ὥραν = literally, for an hour). So the idea of ...


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One Way At present I only have time to outline how I particularly would fit this text with my dispensational view about two categories of resurrection separated by time periods. There are actually two possible ways the verse can fit (or even combining both ideas): The "hour" is not necessarily definite, for it lacks the article (ἔρχεται ὥρα), so "an hour ...


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Like the Gladiator movie, G-d has made us a movie of Malchus to be written on receiving inspiration considering him and what he saw and witnessed. That day as a temple soldier he might have missed the divine connection (doubtful) of having been thrown back on the ground, but it's definitely too hard to expect je didn't get the intimacy of the message when ...


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As you point out, the word φέρω can mean either "carry" or "bear". I think the traditional understanding as "bear" is well supported. I will address the contextual issues that have led you to wonder if it might not mean “bear" in the sense of “produce." Objection #1 OP: Branches are normally associated with trees not vines. True. However, κλήματα are ...


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When the high priest sprinkled blood onto the arc in the holy of holies, the blood was accepted by the Father. When Jesus came out of the grave he had to ascend to the Father and have His sacrifice accepted which the Father did. He didn't want Mary touching him before He ascended


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[Just to make my bias clear up front, I don't agree with the NASB's interpretation in this instance.] I don't know any of the NASB translators personally (I'm not famous or anything thankfully), so I don't know for sure why they interpreted this passage in this way. C. Stirling Bartholomew explained the most likely possibilities (in my opinion). I'm ...


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Rev. 1:10 I was in the spirit on the Lord’s day, and I heard behind me a loud voice like a trumpet Rev. 4:1   After this I looked, and there in heaven a door stood open! And the first voice, which I had heard speaking to me like a trumpet, said, “Come up here, and I will show you what must take place after this.” Rev. 1:10 ἐγενόμην ἐν ...



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