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It was early in the third day of the week. In other words, Monday evening. Bear in mind that Jewish days began at twilight - not midnight as we understand it. So, the Sabbath always began twilight (6pm?) Friday to 6pm Saturday. So ... 1st day = Sat/Sun 2nd day = Sun/Mon 3rd day = Mon/Tue No, it was not the 3rd day of his ministry. It was the 5th day ...


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In verse 19 Jesus appears and shows them his hands and his side. Why does he do that? Either he is A) showing them that he no longer has wounds (he is resurrected and healed) or b) he is showing them the wounds are still there as verification that he's not a spirit, etc. Jesus goes, and Thomas comes and the disciples tell him what has happened. What does ...


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The New Testament appears to indicate that after his resurrection, Jesus remained disfigured with the scars from the crucifixion. That is, Thomas would have seen with his eyes the actual nail marks and other disfiguring marks from the crucifixion. For example, in the Emmaus account the disciples had recognized Jesus after his resurrection only after he had ...


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He knew she needed to repent of her adultery before being counted worthy of the blessing. Supporting verses: Draw near to God, and he will draw near to you. Cleanse your hands, you sinners, and purify your hearts, you who are double-minded. (James 4:8) Let us draw near with a true heart full of faith, since our hearts have been sprinkled ...


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The men bringing the woman "caught in adultery" were supposed to have took her to the High Priests guards and subsequently began a court proceeding etc.. But just to prove their true lack of faith in even the Mosaic Law of the day, they brought her before Jesus and accused her to him, trying ( of course ) to trip him up with Legal wrangling etc.. But Jesus, ...


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Jewish holy days are also ‘Sabbaths’, even if they don’t fall on a Saturday. The Jewish Encyclopedia’s entry for Holy Days states: Upon the six holy days in the Jewish calendar—the first and seventh days of Passover, the first and eighth days of Sukkot (Tabernacles), the day of Shebu'ot (Weeks), and the day of Rosh ha-Shanah (New-Year)—the ...


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No, the Sanhedrin at the time of Christ apparently had lost the power to execute the death penalty. In one important matter, however, the authority of the Sanhedrim was abridged: the Romans deprived it of the power of life and death. They might pronounce sentence of death, but the sanction of the Roman governor had to be obtained before that sentence ...


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In John 1:21, who is ‘the prophet’? Answer: NOT Jesus, and not Mohammed either. At least, not as it relates to the hermeneutics of this text. Theologians can debate the ‘correct’ formulation of (Jewish or Christian or Moslem or Mormon) messianic expectation and assert who fulfills that hope within their system. But I understand hermeneutics is about the ...


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The fulfilment of Psalm 69:21 in John 19:28-29 Properly speaking John 19:28 and the 'I thirst' statement of John 19:28 is linked to Ps 69:3 which says: "I am weary with my crying; My throat is dry; My eyes fail while I wait for my God." it is John 19:29 that could be linked to Ps 69:21, the commentator notes: The connection of the Markan Death Story, ...


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Despite being the son of God, Jesus had thumos and phren and splachna and all the other parts common to men. It's small wonder, then, that the sight of the temple being made into an exchange brought out his zelos. But "ζῆλος" is not a response to abstract injustice, nor a political revolt, nor civil disobedience. If it were, verses like 2 Cor 7:7 ...


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Based on the Talmud, even when it was in force, the standards for applying the death penalty were stringent (Makkot 7b). The Mishna states that the death penalty was infrequent, and that a Sanhedrin that applied the death penalty once every 70 years was considered an irresponsible court (Makkot 1:10). The death penalty was abolished 40 years before the ...



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