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19

No, John 14:16 cannot be used to "cancel" the Trinity and posit a Quaternity (or whatever), and specifically not "Spirits" of past and present. In the understanding of later Christian tradition, the Christian Bible depicts God as outside time in any case: see, e.g. Psalm 90:2 or 1 Timothy 1:17. That is why the "past" and "present" Spirits are nonsensical. ...


10

The Phrasing is Not a Direct Comment on Jesus being over 40 Years Old Irenaeus is in error with his logic here, partly because he is missing the context and particular significance of the statement. Background Rather than being a direct comment on Jesus' age (i.e. over 40 years old), the number 50 is stated because of its significance in Levitical service....


6

The Liddell-Scott-Jones dictionary (Ninth Edition, p. 421) states unambiguously that the phrase διδακτοὶ τοῦ θεοῦ should be translated as "taught by God." They also reference Isaiah 54:13. In Classical Ancient Greek, verbs that denote knowing, learning, etc. take the genitive for what we would consider their direct objects. This would tend to support the ...


6

The setting here is long before the invention of the printing press. The scriptures were hand copied, thus ordinary people would not have been able to own a copy of the scriptures. However, in ancient Judea during the Second Temple Period, the Jewish scriptures(Christian Old Testament) would have been publicly available in the synagogues to read. In fact, ...


5

The OP requests clarification about why the English is not: ?For God so loved the world, that he gave the only son.... What is the meaning of this English, and does it accurately convey the Greek? To me, this construction is questionably intelligible. It seems to imply that there was never another son (of anyone), which is patently false, causing me ...


5

Commentators generally see this as a reference to the Mosaic laws forbidding blasphemy. For example, Barnes' Notes, the Pulpit Commentary, the Cambridge Bible and Ellicott's Commentary see it this way. Whoever blasphemes the name of the LORD shall surely be put to death. All the congregation shall stone him. The sojourner as well as the native, when he ...


5

The inspiration was presumably drawn from Leviticus 24:16: וְנֹקֵ֤ב שֵׁם־יְהוָה֙ מ֣וֹת יוּמָ֔ת / רָג֥וֹם יִרְגְּמוּ־ב֖וֹ כָּל־הָעֵדָ֑ה wĕnōqēb šēm-yhwh môt yûmāt / rāgôm yirgĕmû-bô kol-hāʿēdâ Whoever blasphemes the name of the LORD shall surely be put to death. / All the congregation shall stone him. (ESV) This comes into the Greek (LXX Rahlfs | ...


5

The existing answers make some good points, particularly: (1) the physical/biological demands of crucifixion; and (2) that Jesus announces his thirst. He does not, in fact, "ask for a drink" (OP's original concern), and this is vital for understanding the gospel at this point. Because there is also a textual response. In manner distinct from the synoptic ...


4

As you point out, the word φέρω can mean either "carry" or "bear". I think the traditional understanding as "bear" is well supported. I will address the contextual issues that have led you to wonder if it might not mean “bear" in the sense of “produce." Objection #1 OP: Branches are normally associated with trees not vines. True. However, κλήματα are ...


4

My Unified Perspective Background I am one scholar who views it from a unified perspective. My particular argument for this immediately follows here. I will then note some other versions of unified views, and just a second hand listing of non-unified views. Regarding: Uh, Jesus, didn't Simon Peter and Thomas just ask you this? Yes, they had. Now the ...


4

In John 1:17, the Greek text according to the Textus Receptus (Estienne, 1550) states, ὅτι ὁ νόμος διὰ Μωσέως ἐδόθη ἡ χάρις καὶ ἡ ἀλήθεια διὰ Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ ἐγένετο which is translated as, since the Law was given by Moses; grace and truth came by Jesus Christ. It would seem as though the author is contrasting the Law with grace and truth and ...


4

You state regarding John 14:9: The phrase "he who has seen me has seen the Father," taken literally, seems to suggest that the Father looks exactly like the Lord Jesus Christ. Ergo, the Father must be corporal, having flesh and bones, and the Father must be Jewish, too. Yet, elsewhere, it is written that "God is spirit" (John 4:24), and "a spirit ...


4

Jesus said to him, “Have I been with you so long, and you still do not know me, Philip? Whoever has seen me has seen the Father. How can you say, ‘Show us the Father’? John 14:9 (ESV) The phrase "he who has seen me has seen the Father" refers to the works of the Father being seen in the words and deeds of Jesus Christ, who is God in flesh (cf: ...


4

I expect a lot depended on the printer. Here are two early printings. In each, notice that not only is "worde" not capitalized, but neither is "god". This one is the first of Tyndale's New Testaments (later revised): the 1525 printing from Cologne: And this is John 1 from the 1526 Peter Schoeffer printing which similarly set in uppercase the first words ...


4

The phase "in the bosom" (κολπον /kolpos) in this context conveys the eternal intimate communion between the Father and Son. Most bibles, even some paraphrases, do not alter the word "bosom". Probably because our English vernacular still uses the word to express the seat of deep affection. Albert Barnes commentary notes on this verse reads: In the ...


4

The very next verse refers to the appearance you assert as an unwarranted presumption: Then went this saying abroad among the brethren, that that disciple should not die: yet Jesus said not unto him, He shall not die; but, If I will that he tarry till I come, what is that to thee? - John 21:23 KJV (emphasis added) Consequently, commentators such as ...


4

The IF's of John 13-14 The phrase in question depends on the larger context of the passage to be properly understood: Let not your heart be troubled: ye believe in God, believe also in me. In my Father's house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you. And if I go and prepare a place for you, I ...


4

Answer: Yes, it is explicitly mentioned that Jesus loved someone. In John 13:23, it is written, Now there was one of his disciples reclining on Jesus' bosom, whom Jesus loved. ἦν δέ ἀνακείμενος εἷς τῶν μαθητῶν αὐτοῦ ἐν τῷ κόλπῳ τοῦ Ἰησοῦ ὃν ἠγάπα ὁ Ἰησοῦς TR, 1550 This particular disciple is often referred to as "the beloved disciple." However, ...


4

The question is actually great. It prompts us to see John 17:3 in light of exegetical analysis. John 17:3 And this is eternal life, that they know you the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom you have sent. John 17:3 is explicit that eternal life is knowing both the Father and the Son. Eternal Life is neither only the Father nor only the Son but ...


3

The night is death. Work refers to serving God and doing good works. Jesus, in this passage, senses his own coming death. In the verse after, John 9:5, Jesus says that he is the light of the world as long as he is in the world. Therefore, when he leaves the world (in the sense of his death and ascension), day becomes night. John 6:29 mentions a single all-...


3

There isn't much deep meaning here beyond "with". The combination "εἰμί...πρός" appears in plenty of other places meaning simply "to be...with", especially when people are both the subject and object. A few from the NT for flavor: Mark 14:49 Every day I was with you in the temple teaching... Luke 9:41 And Jesus answered and said, “You unbelieving ...


3

I emailed the Lockman Foundation regarding this question, and their editorial department responded, saying essentially: The simplest way to translate 4:1 is "the first voice which I heard" (not "had heard"). If "I heard" is the translation, it could theoretically be understood as not referring to 1:10-11. The translators thought that John was most likely ...


3

[Just to make my bias clear up front, I don't agree with the NASB's interpretation in this instance.] I don't know any of the NASB translators personally (I'm not famous or anything thankfully), so I don't know for sure why they interpreted this passage in this way. C. Stirling Bartholomew explained the most likely possibilities (in my opinion). I'm ...


3

I'd like to provide an alternative perspective on this text and get some feedback on whether this is considered a legitimate approach to others. The more I read John 1, it seems that John is making a parallel with the creation account. Some examples that seem to indicate this to me: "In the beginning" in John 1:1 seems to reference the creation account ...


3

It seems that the Romans initially allowed the Jewish authorities to exercise capital punishment, but withdrew the privilege some time during Jesus' life. The historian Josephus writes of an instance in which stonings occurred, probably around the year 62 CE. The short version is as follows: The Roman prefect of Judæa, a man named Porcius Festus, died ...


3

The same word is found in Mark 10:51 and John 20:16: ραββουνι (rabbouni). Rabbi vs Rabboni (in English translations) The distinction in English versions is related to a choice between translation (using an English word) and transliteration (letter-for-letter copying of the Greek). In Mark 10:51, Rabbi (an established English word, albeit also originally ...


3

There are two possible explanations. One is that the individual Gospel writers did not arrange events in a chronologic order; each one organized the events in a way that made the most sense to their audience or to best fit their theological emphasis. The second is that Jesus did this on more than one occasion and John records the first which took place ...


3

The Greek word for 'spirit' is the same as the word for 'wind' The wind is an invisible force with obvious physical effects. One of those effects is that 'you hear its sound'. In those days, it was certainly true that people did not understand where the wind came from, or where it was going. The answer to your question comes from Jesus's own words in the ...


3

John answers this question in v.7-8: 7 Beloved, I am writing you no new commandment, but an old commandment that you had from the beginning. The old commandment is the word that you have heard. 8 At the same time, it is a new commandment that I am writing to you, which is true in him and in you, because the darkness is passing away and the true light is ...



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