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11

Satan is the father of Cain in that Cain acted like Satan. Genesis tells us that Adam (literally "the man") fathered Cain and Abel. Genesis 4:1 Now the man had relations with his wife Eve, and she conceived and gave birth to Cain, and she said, "I have gotten a manchild with the help of the LORD." The Hebrew grammar here shows that each step is a ...


10

Short Answer: Yes, it is definitely possible for John's chronology to be reconciled with that of the Synoptics. As the following chart shows, the sequence of Passion events recorded in John is in perfect harmony with the sequence in the Synoptics. When John's terminology is properly understood, it becomes clear that John's chronology does not contradict that ...


10

Frank Luke's answer is clear enough to realize Cain is Adam's son, no question about that. I want to address something else you state: Assuming that Cain is the person that Jesus is referring to I would not assume that, nor would I argue that is correct. I take Jesus's statement as wholly referencing "the Devil" himself (just as the verse states). He ...


9

As has already been pointed out, the progression is Jesus ἀγαπᾷς ἀγαπάω Verb Second Present Active Indicative Singular Peter φιλῶ φιλέω Verb First Present Active Indicative Singular Jesus ἀγαπᾷς ἀγαπάω Verb Second Present Active Indicative Singular Peter φιλῶ φιλέω Verb First Present Active Indicative Singular ...


9

As others have said, "The Prophet" is Jesus. The prophet being Jesus is better than Mohammed because Moses' prophecy (Deuteronomy 18:15) says that he will arise "from your midst, of your brethren." The NET renders the idiom "your brethren" this way: 18:15 The Lord your God will raise up for you a prophet like me from among you – from your fellow ...


8

If there is a contradiction at all between Paul's tradition and the tradition of the Gospel writers, it can be resolved as a text critical issue here in 1 Corinthians 11:24. Most of the early manuscripts simply have Τοῦτό μού ἐστιν τὸ σῶμα τὸ ὑπὲρ ὑμῶν - "This is my body, which is for you." The short phrase τὸ ὑπὲρ ὑμῶν also appears in 2 Corinthians 9:3, ...


7

A survey of the uses of these words in Johannine literature will be conducted. ἀγάπη (agape): "The quality of warm regard for and interest in another, esteem, affection, regard, love (without limitation to very intimate relationships, and very seldom in general Greek of sexual attraction)."1 This word appears in the noun form 30 times in 25 verses of ...


7

Context is the key to interpretation. You’ve heard the mantra in real-estate, “location, location, location.” Well in interpretation its, “context, context, context.” The location of a verse matters in its interpretation. Think of the word “hand,” for instance. What does it mean? Without context “hand” could have quite a few meanings. the hired hand ...


7

The very first miracle Jesus performed was a living illustration of his mission to cleanse. What did Jesus mean that his hour had not yet come? His hour to perform miracles? His mother surely was not asking him to perform a miracle, for he had never even done any miracles. Besides that, he immediately performed the miracle, something he would not have ...


7

One option, of course, is to say that two similar events happened, one at the beginning of Jesus' ministry and one at the end. This is hard to maintain, however, as John frequently re-orders events from the synoptic gospels to achieve his theological point. Moreover, the descriptions of the events are very close. So we have to ask why John chose to move it ...


6

The meaning of the English article In English the article ("the") is used to make a word definite. This is how you would demand an indefinite pizza: Bring me a pizza This is how you would demand a definite pizza: Bring me the pizza The meaning of the Greek article The meaning of the Greek article is slightly different, which can make it ...


6

Within Johannine literature, there seems to be quite a bit of overlap in the uses of the agapao and phileo word groups. Here are a number of pairings of verses across the body of work wherein there seems to be no distinguishable difference of usage. Each pairing below begins with a verse using the agapao word group followed by a similar one using the phileo ...


6

When comparing John 20:30-31 to other early Christian texts, it appears 'Christ' and 'son of God' (and 'Lord') were understood as synonyms when used for Jesus. The two terms appear in conjunction somewhat regularly1, a few you have already noted in a comment above. The reason for why the two phrases are so often used in relation to each other probably ...


6

I am an amateur at this, but I think that 2 Samuel 23 gives us a big clue as to how to interpret Jesus' remarks. Jesus's language appears to be the same language used by David who refused to drink of the water that the soldiers brought him because they had risked their lives to bring it to him, and what they brought to David was not worth them losing their ...


6

The four instances of this clause in John 6 are: 6:39 (NET) — "Now this is the will of the one who sent me—that I should not lose one person of every one he has given me, but raise them all up at the last day." 6:40 (NET) — "For this is the will of my Father—for everyone who looks on the Son and believes in him to have eternal life, and I will ...


6

One possibility: the Beloved Disciple is Lazarus The primary source for laying out a case for the author's identity is John 21.24-25, the final two verses of the book. Here we are given a brief glimpse at the book's origin: it seems to have been written by or based on the testimony of an individual we identify as the Beloved Disciple ('This is the disciple ...


5

There are three common answers to this question today. Real Human Death. John says the soldiers pierced Jesus’ side because when they came to hasten his death they unexpectedly found him already dead. The piercing is thus the soilders way of answering the question, “Has Jesus truly died?” John may have wanted to definitevly answer this question because ...


5

Short Answer: Many have come up with various numerological interpretations of the number 153 in John. I believe this to be reading into the text things not intended by the author. As the two previous answers to this questions illustrate well, this numerological method allows for several different interpretations of the same passage. Each of the words in ...


5

Short Answer: Yes. I am sure that this is not the answer that most of us want to hear. From a purely grammatical perspective, before claiming that Jehovah’s Witnesses added “a God”, see why many Trinitarian Bible translations have translated John 1:1 as “a God”. The NWT was published in 1951 and I am quoting from the appendix of the New World Translation ...


5

Jesus is not referring to what systematic theologians call "regeneration." In John 1, we learn that Jesus granted this birth to many who would already have been (by systematic theological standards) "regenerate." (Compare 1:11–13 with the calling of the disciples in 1:35–51.) He is telling Nicodemus, as a representative teacher of Israel that "you all," all ...


5

Not necessarily. Being a Roman administrator, Pilate would know Latin and Greek without question. Latin was the legal language of the empire (and commonly spoken in the oldest parts of the empire), and Greek was the common language of the rest of the empire. Alexander the Great and his successors forced territories they conquered to speak Greek. When the ...


5

I do not believe that the grammar alone is capable of determining that. The present participial phrase πᾶς ὁ πιστεύων ("all who believe") seems to imply a continuous action, since one might suppose that the author would have used the aorist participial phrase πᾶς ὁ πιστεύσας ("all who believed") to more aptly represent a singular historical act of belief. On ...


5

Context Jesus is having a conversation with Nicodemus, who we are told in John 3:1 is a man of the Pharisees (ἄνθρωπος ἐκ τῶν Φαρισαίων) and a ruler of the Jews (ἄρχων τῶν Ἰουδαίων). Jesus tells Nicodemus that he must be born again (from above, γεννηθῇ ἄνωθεν) or else he will be unable to see the kingdom of God (τὴν βασιλείαν τοῦ θεοῦ), and that he must be ...


5

Judicial execution under Jewish law around that time was very rare and on the decline. Rabbi Akiva (c. 40-137 CE) said that a court that ever executes is bloodthirsty; Rabbi Eleazar ben Azariah, dates uncertain but in the generation before R. Akiva, said a court that executes once in 70 years is bloodthirsty; others say once in seven years (Makkot 1:10, ...


5

With John 1:21 those asking the questions still consider that Prophet to be one person and the Christ another. They therefore ask John about the Prophet after John tells them he's not the Christ. What all of them seem to easily recall is what Moses had said; Deut 18:15 The LORD thy God will raise up unto thee a Prophet from the midst of thee, of thy ...


5

Genesis 2:2 וַיְכַל אֱלֹהִים בַּיֹּום הַשְּׁבִיעִי מְלַאכְתֹּו אֲשֶׁר עָשָׂה וַיִּשְׁבֹּת בַּיֹּום הַשְּׁבִיעִי מִכָּל־מְלַאכְתֹּו אֲשֶׁר עָשָֽׂה׃ The word translated as "rest" in English, is actually the conjugated word from which we get the English word Sabbath, which actually means to "cease doing". וַיִּשְׁבֹּת or by its root: שָׁבַת ...


4

I would suggest two reasons to think they are referring to simply the Scriptures. First, there is only one other use of the word search (ἐραυνάω) in the Fourth Gospel, which is in John 5:39. There Jesus says: You search the Scriptures because you think that in them you have eternal life; and it is they that bear witness about me, yet you refuse to come ...


4

Nowhere in scripture does it say that Jesus took up the trade of his father. In fact, the absence of of any writing about his life from 13-30 would lead an Israelite reader to assume that he DID have formal rabbinic training, and rather, the verse here is a blatant statement from John that Jesus did not, however, state his first teaching on any other rabbi's ...


4

Some of the most significant aspects of this are "typological," i.e. they refer to a pattern established earlier in Scripture, now fulfilled in Jesus. (Paul reflects the NT handling of the OT in this regard in 1 Cor 10:6, 11, when he refers to Israel's wilderness experience as providing "patterns" for "us"—the word he uses is "tupoi," from which we derive ...


4

One of the two great themes of the book of John is that those who believe can have life in Jesus’ name. (John 20:31) In John 14-17 Jesus revealed the magnitude of this teaching, showing that he desires people to be one with him, just as he is one with the Father. In the next few verses after John 14:2, Jesus tried to emphasize that he was going to the ...



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