Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

The Question This is an excellent question, and one that in different forms has been pondered by interpreters of John's gospel for centuries. My own way of capturing what is at stake here would be to put it this way: what Jesus is reported as saying in John 8:58 caused outrage in his hearers; although reported here in Greek, it is safe to assume there is ...


4

Bibliographic Postscript This is offered as a supplement to Soldarnal's fine answer. Probably the most thorough (one is tempted to say "exhaustive") account of the internal evidence bearing on the question of the common authorship of gJohn and 1 John is found in A.E. Brooke, A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Johannine Epistles (Edinburgh, 1912), ...


4

While before the 20th century there was common agreement on common authorship between the Gospel and Epistles of John, there is, as you mention, no such agreement today. At the same time, we are quick to note, however, that John and 1 John share a vocabulary of words and thought forms to such an extent that no one has mounted a serious proposal that they are ...


3

The Idea in Brief The context appears to include both: that is, life despite ("even though") death and life after death. The statement also implies the obverse: those who are alive but do not believe are dead. Discussion The passage occurs as follows in the 28th Revised Edition of Aland's Greek New Testament (2012). John 11:25 (mGNT) 25 εἶπεν αὐτῇ ὁ ...


2

First of all, we should look at the history of this passage. When we read the Bible, it says (KJV John 5:2-7): Now there is at Jerusalem by the sheep market a pool, which is called in the Hebrew tongue Bethesda, having five porches. In these lay a great multitude of impotent folk, of blind, halt, withered, waiting for the moving of the water. For an ...


1

One characteristic of Biblical prophecy (as I understand it) is that it is rarely intended to reveal specific details about future events in advance, but rather to "foreshadow" those events in such a way that future observers will recognize them and say, "Aha! So that's what he was talking about." This is true both in Old & New Testament prophecy and ...


1

If Jesus' comment about being "lifted up" were an obfuscation (and I'm not saying it was), it wouldn't be the first time! For some of Jesus' audiences, his use of obfuscation was deliberate. In his modus operandi, obfuscation was one way for him to separate the sheep from the goats, so to speak; i.e., the believers from the unbelievers, hangers-on, and ...


1

Interesting question. There is another word used for "lift up" in John. In Strong's it is number 142, airo. The lift up in John 12:32 is hypsotho (Strong's number 5312), which connotes exaltation (see also v.34). In the larger context of John 12 I recommend David Flusser's The Sage of Galilee. To paraphrase Flusser, I suggest the following: ...


1

Let's not forget that one of the tasks of a thorough hermeneutic is to consider Jesus' original audience and how they would interpret the metaphor. His audience was not composed of plant biologists but mostly non-scientific-types who had actual experiences with growing wheat to make bread, the "staff of life" back then. Combine this piece of the ...


1

Good question, and to be fair the Bible does have the below verses: Deuteronomy 23:7 "Do not despise an Edomite, for the Edomites are related to you. Do not despise an Egyptian, because you resided as foreigners in their country." http://biblehub.com/deuteronomy/23-7.htm And as for Ishmael, I have heard you: I will surely bless him; I will ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible