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In answering this question, which is based on the account in John's Gospel, it is important not to read into this Gospel any facts or notions found elsewhere. John's Gospel differs from the synoptic gospels in that it does not mention the Last Supper as a sacred feast (cf Mark 14:18-26), instead having Jesus wash the feet of the disciples after what appears ...


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The phrase is definitively Johannine, occurring five times in four verses, all in Johannine texts. The Greek syntax, at a minimum, consists of a conjugation of the verb πιστεύω, the preposition εἰς, and the noun τὸ ὄνομα.1 John 1:12 But as many as received him, he gave power to them to become sons of God, [even] to those who believe in his name. ...


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In the languages of the Scriptures, the words for "name" had a concrete meaning of that by which a person was called (e.g. Matthew 1:21), and also a figurative meaning of the renown, reputation, and character of the person (e.g. Matthew 20:22). From Strong's lexicon, (figuratively) the manifestation or revelation of someone's character, i.e. as ...


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The oldest manuscript we have of John is in the Codex Sinaiticus. In both verses, it says, “life eternal.” It’s in Koine Greek, on papyrus, dated 350 AD. I photographed the two passages from the Codex Sinaiticus. John 4:36 is here: (pdf) John 6:40 is here: (pdf) Scroll down to see the actual, handwritten manuscript. For John 4:36, go to the second ...



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