Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

Satan is the father of Cain in that Cain acted like Satan. Genesis tells us that Adam (literally "the man") fathered Cain and Abel. Genesis 4:1 Now the man had relations with his wife Eve, and she conceived and gave birth to Cain, and she said, "I have gotten a manchild with the help of the LORD." The Hebrew grammar here shows that each step is a ...


10

Frank Luke's answer is clear enough to realize Cain is Adam's son, no question about that. I want to address something else you state: Assuming that Cain is the person that Jesus is referring to I would not assume that, nor would I argue that is correct. I take Jesus's statement as wholly referencing "the Devil" himself (just as the verse states). He ...


5

Genesis 2:2 וַיְכַל אֱלֹהִים בַּיֹּום הַשְּׁבִיעִי מְלַאכְתֹּו אֲשֶׁר עָשָׂה וַיִּשְׁבֹּת בַּיֹּום הַשְּׁבִיעִי מִכָּל־מְלַאכְתֹּו אֲשֶׁר עָשָֽׂה׃ The word translated as "rest" in English, is actually the conjugated word from which we get the English word Sabbath, which actually means to "cease doing". וַיִּשְׁבֹּת or by its root: שָׁבַת ...


4

A slightly larger context answers this question. KJV 31 Then said Jesus to those Jews which believed on him, If ye continue in my word, then are ye my disciples indeed; 32 And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free. 33 They answered him, We be Abraham’s seed, and were never in bondage to any man: how sayest thou, Ye shall be ...


3

God did cease working on the seventh day, from His creative works. That is to say, everything in existence (i.e., all matter) came into existence at that particular time. Thereafter, however, God began to work in a different manner, even until now, a manner in which man cannot work, as John Chrysostom elaborated in his Homily on the Gospel of John: But ...


3

Nearly every expositor I have looked up concludes that this is actually just a hasty staement made by proud men who have a distatesfull view of Jesus. In other words the particular Jews in the account are made to seem so proud and foolish that they straightway deny their obvious history and current situation under Rome as a vassal state. Owen has this view: ...


2

The Jews were probably referring to the the fact that they had fought for thier freedom from the Greeks (Maccabees) and were not bound to be Roman citizens, but they had thier own culture, even they were still under Roman rule. They were not really free at this writing, but allowed a certian allowance to be thier own culture. They were in denial of thier own ...


2

The tricky aspect of interpreting verses 21-23 involves the time (or timing) element. There are several things to keep in mind, particularly from the evangelical tradition: Jesus, in one of His post-resurrection appearances to His disciples, intended by His enduement of the Holy Spirit to them to tide them over, as it were, until the Holy Spirit ...


2

All the Evangelists mention the cup which Jesus elected to drain to its last bitter drop. That cup, of course, comprised all the events of what we call "Passion Week," particularly His crucifixion. While the disciples were arguing about which of them was the greatest, and who should get to sit on the right and the left of Jesus when He established His ...


2

Because earlier while Jesus prayed in the garden, Jesus asked His father, God, "If it be thy will let this cup pass from me", in a request that He not have to suffer death on the cross. This was before the incident in the garden where He is arrested and Peter draws His sword. At this point Jesus is referring to the fact that God required Jesus to go as a ...


2

In the story you point out it makes sense to think about their sources. It seems that Matthew and Mark had almost the exact same source material--probably either well known oral tradition or an actual document that is lost to us. Luke seems to have had the same source as Matthew and Mark, but also some extra information that he decided to include. John, ...


2

Aside from the manuscript evidence, which seems inconclusive, the most practical reading is to take it exactly as it is. Or as a not in the NET Bible says in a note on v. 8... "Jesus may simply have been refusing to accompany his brothers with the rest of the group of pilgrims, preferring to travel separately and “in secret” (v. 10) with his ...


1

I see where codices P66 P75 (both c. 175-225 CE) and 03 (c. 325-375 CE) contain ΟΥΠΟ (ουπω, not yet) at John 7:8, while the later codex 01 (c. 375-425 CE) has ΟΥΚ (ουκ, not) at that place. I also see no patristic allusions referring to this verse albeit Robertson (Word Pictures in the NT) wrote: "Some of the early Greek Fathers were puzzled over the ...


1

There are depths within this question. If we consider the nature of the writers of the four accounts it may help put things into perspective. Matthew (Matthias Levi - described as the son of Alphaeus, although there are problems with this) may have been the author of ‘Matthew’s’ gospel, but more probably ‘Matthew’ is a dedication. Even so the author may ...


1

When Mary received the news from the angel Gabriel that she would receive the Promised Seed, she went "in those days" (Luke 1:39) to see her cousin Elizabeth, who was already pregnant with John the Baptist (Luke 1:44). So John was physically older than Jesus. Now in John 1:30 we see the perfect tense of γίγνομαι occur as follows. That is, John the Baptist ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible