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34

Short answer: no. Long answer: While the Greek lacks the definite article on theos in the clause under discussion, that doesn't mean the English should be translated with an indefinite article. Greek and English do not enjoy a one-to-one relationship between their words. There are times in Greek when the article is present but not translated into English. ...


18

It does not appear to be a very good translation of this word. 1473 (εγώ) is the personal pronoun, "I", so it tells us that Jesus was talking about Himself. 1510.2.1 (ειμι) is the real core of the question. 1510 is the infinitive "to be, exist". The following numbers (".2.1") tell you more about the nuances of meaning - tense, voice, etc. Some ...


17

"Born of water" does not stand alone here, but rather inseparably collocated with "and spirit". Just as "raining cats and dogs" refers to one rain, or "this item is our bread and butter" refers to one mainstay item, "water and the spirit" refers to one birth. In other words, we are not to take this is "first you must be born of water and then of spirit"; ...


17

Actually, after researching this more, there are multiple possible translations of this 1. Christian Baptism C. H. Dodd reflects this interpretation when he asserts that “the instructed Christian reader would immediately recognize a reference to Baptism, as the sacrament through which the Spirit was given to believers, and by which they were initiated ...


17

This answer is supplementary to Frank Luke's, and supports it. When someone makes a claim about an ancient language's grammar, it always helps me to believe it and internalize it when I can see parallel usages that illustrate the truth of the claim. Thus, I am glad that Frank Luke offered several examples. I have another which is perhaps even more to the ...


14

In addition to the points already provided, may I offer a more obvious point based on simple logic? So, the question is, should the latter θεός in John 1:1 be translated into English as "God" or "a god"? In John 1:3, it is written that «πάντα δι᾽ αὐτοῦ ἐγένετο καὶ χωρὶς αὐτοῦ ἐγένετο οὐδὲ ἕν ὃ γέγονεν», that is, "All things were made by him, and not one ...


13

First, to recap, Jesus had just made some pretty huge claims, culminating in the one you quoted in v30. They Jews were incensed by this, and about to stone him for blasphemy, when he went with the "not guilty" plea, and used this quote from Psalm 82 as his defense. His argument is this: If God himself (speaking through the Psalmist) can refer to another as ...


13

The footnote exists because textual variants exist (different manuscripts have different words). Although "son" and "god" seem different, μονογενὴς θεός (the only God) and ὁ μονογενὴς υἱός (the only son) are actually not far off. In fact, in some of the manuscripts, they are contracted such that only one letter distinguishes them. We cannot be certain which ...


13

This is a great question, and you're not the first person to have it. Today, the phrase "born again" can have any one of a host of meanings. It can have meaning in the secular world, such as a "born again" politician who changes political parties, or in the religious world, where "born again Christian" is sometimes used to differentiate one from a ...


12

This is a big question and I think it will help to refactor it into some related questions: What did Jesus see as his mission? From the passages you cited and the fact that Jesus spent most of his time teaching Jews, it's not a stretch to say that Jesus saw his mission as limited to Israel. Now Jesus did go into the region of the Decapolis, which began as ...


11

Short Answer: There is strong evidence from Scripture that they actually received the Spirit at Pentecost, and that what we see in John 20:22 was Jesus giving them a visual illustration and command in preparation for that event. The Controversy For reference, here is the statement in question: He breathed on them and said to them, “Receive the Holy ...


11

The latest argument in Evangelical theological circles is that we should not consider this part of the canon. The ESV Study Bible is a bible published in the last few years and all of the scholarship and notes comes from a wide swath of Evangelical theologians and academics. Its study note on this passage provides a good summary of this view: 7:53–8:11 ...


11

While some have argued for some kind of symbolism in the number shown here, there is no direct support from the text. The notes from the Net Bible indicate the following direct implications: This may have been a larger-than-average catch (especially in context of the following phrase - the net didn't tear under the load) This may be indicative of blessing ...


11

Satan is the father of Cain in that Cain acted like Satan. Genesis tells us that Adam (literally "the man") fathered Cain and Abel. Genesis 4:1 Now the man had relations with his wife Eve, and she conceived and gave birth to Cain, and she said, "I have gotten a manchild with the help of the LORD." The Hebrew grammar here shows that each step is a ...


10

The fourth evangelist must have known the basic literary structure of Mark's Gospel: Starting with John the Baptist, baptism of Christ, the call of the disciples (Joh 1:35-51) and ending with Passion and Resurrection of Christ.1 Some more compositional analogies: Feeding of the crowd: Mk 6:30-44, Mk 8:1-9, Joh 6:5-13 Jesus on the lake: Mk 6:45-52, Mk ...


10

A few points to make here. As you noted, the Greek here is a bit slightly ambiguous and could go either way. For the purpose of your question, we are assuming a particular reading, so I will avoid that discussion here. But let's back up a bit, and see the whole quote: On the last day of the feast, the great day, Jesus stood up and cried out, “If anyone ...


10

The last we hear of Joseph is in Luke 2 during the Jerusalem passover trip when Jesus was 12. Luke 2:43  And when they had fulfilled the days, as they returned, the child Jesus tarried behind in Jerusalem; and Joseph and his mother knew not of it. The consensus is that Joseph was long since dead by the time of Jesus' ministry. It would have probably ...


10

This is the historical record regarding The Temple and the Samaritans from the Bible. Moses instructed the Israelites that there should be only one place of worship. Deuteronomy 12:8-11 (NIV) You are not to do as we do here today, everyone doing as they see fit, since you have not yet reached the resting place and the inheritance the Lord your God ...


10

Short Answer: Yes, it is definitely possible for John's chronology to be reconciled with that of the Synoptics. As the following chart shows, the sequence of Passion events recorded in John is in perfect harmony with the sequence in the Synoptics. When John's terminology is properly understood, it becomes clear that John's chronology does not contradict that ...


10

Frank Luke's answer is clear enough to realize Cain is Adam's son, no question about that. I want to address something else you state: Assuming that Cain is the person that Jesus is referring to I would not assume that, nor would I argue that is correct. I take Jesus's statement as wholly referencing "the Devil" himself (just as the verse states). He ...


9

One thing we might note is the familiarity with parts of the Synoptic tradition which the author assumes of his reader. For instance, in John 1:40, the author introduces Andrew as Simon Peter's brother before having introduced Simon Peter. In 2:1f the author speaks of Jesus' mother, never introducing her as Mary. And in John 11:1-2 Lazarus is introduced as ...


9

The first chapter of the Gospel of John seems to contrast with the rest of the book, in style and purpose. John 1:1-18 is different from the rest of the book in the way that a preface is different than the rest of any book. On the other hand, it also has cohesion with the rest of the book the way that a preface has cohesion with the rest of any book. ...


9

As has already been pointed out, the progression is Jesus ἀγαπᾷς ἀγαπάω Verb Second Present Active Indicative Singular Peter φιλῶ φιλέω Verb First Present Active Indicative Singular Jesus ἀγαπᾷς ἀγαπάω Verb Second Present Active Indicative Singular Peter φιλῶ φιλέω Verb First Present Active Indicative Singular ...


9

D. A. Carson's commentary on John (generally considered to be the best available commentary on this book of the Bible) explains the following: (See p. 220-222) Different Canon... The Samaritans limited the canon to the Pentateuch. As a result, they accepted Deuteronomy 12:5 as authoritative... But you shall seek the Lord at the place which the Lord ...


9

As others have said, "The Prophet" is Jesus. The prophet being Jesus is better than Mohammed because Moses' prophecy (Deuteronomy 18:15) says that he will arise "from your midst, of your brethren." The NET renders the idiom "your brethren" this way: 18:15 The Lord your God will raise up for you a prophet like me from among you – from your fellow ...


8

There is no Old Testament verse that speaks of living water flowing from within a person. However, we can see this imagery throughout the Old Testament. Imagery This passage is a prophecy of Zechariah, which is talking about God destroying the enemies of Israel: Zechariah 14:8 (NASB) And in that day living waters will flow out of Jerusalem, half ...


8

This is supplemental to @LanceRobert's answer (if Joseph was not dead, these points do not avail much). Remember how much older than John Mary would have been. It has traditionally been held that John was a rather young disciple (note for example that he outruns flamboyant Peter; also a late date for the book of Revelation supports this idea if you ...


8

The gospel of John only gives a few clues to the identity of the beloved disciple. John 13:23 indicates that this disciple was seated next to Jesus at the Last Supper. John 19:27 indicates that he took care of Jesus' mother after the crucifixion. John 20:2 indicates that he went with Peter to see the empty tomb. John 21:7 indicates that he was present when ...


8

If there is a contradiction at all between Paul's tradition and the tradition of the Gospel writers, it can be resolved as a text critical issue here in 1 Corinthians 11:24. Most of the early manuscripts simply have Τοῦτό μού ἐστιν τὸ σῶμα τὸ ὑπὲρ ὑμῶν - "This is my body, which is for you." The short phrase τὸ ὑπὲρ ὑμῶν also appears in 2 Corinthians 9:3, ...


7

Context is the key to interpretation. You’ve heard the mantra in real-estate, “location, location, location.” Well in interpretation its, “context, context, context.” The location of a verse matters in its interpretation. Think of the word “hand,” for instance. What does it mean? Without context “hand” could have quite a few meanings. the hired hand ...



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