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9

I don't think Reformed theology or any other tradition really bears on this issue so much as simple hermeneutics. Jesus spoke using many traits of ordinary language , and forcing an interpretation on the passage that does not take into account the ordinary ways that language is used and people communicate ideas only leaves people with twisted conclusions. ...


7

The short answer is, because he ate "locusts and wild honey" (Mt 3:4; Mk 1:6). The slightly longer explanation is that John the Baptist lived a simple life (Lk 7:25) in the wilderness, where he was called from (Lk 3:2) and in which he ministered (Mt 3:1; Mk 1:4; Lk 7:24). Thus he lived off the land by eating these insects for protein, fat, and nutrients (as ...


6

There are several questions lying beneath the surface of this question: 1) Is it 'conclusive' that the Qumran Scrolls are the work of the Essenes? Scholars are generally in agreement with this conclusion, and cite the "Damascus Document", discovered in Cairo in 1897, or prior to the Qumran scrolls which depict the life of the Essene, the vows they had to ...


4

I have found it quite difficult to find any commentaries, ancient or modern, that state that the "us" is not Jesus and John the Baptist. Your question however has challenged me to look outside my orthodoxy, and so I present two interpretations: 1. Jesus was referring to himself and John the Baptist First, Jesus himself had to be baptised, and he was aware ...


4

Judaism of the time expected two messiahs to come. One of them was called Messiah ben David, and he was to be a warrior king who would run the foreigners out of Judea and Galilee. Messiah ben David would restore the kingdom to the Israelites and reign from the throne as God's right hand. The other was Messiah ben Levi (sometimes called Messiah ben Joseph),...


4

Then he [John] said to the multitudes that came out to be baptized by him, “Brood of vipers! Who warned you to flee from the wrath to come? -Luke 3:7 (NKJV) Luke 3:7 says the multitude came out to be baptized by John. Luke then proceeds with John rebuking pretty much everyone, with Luke specifying exactly how much John rebuked people, even up to the very ...


4

Two reasons barrenness was undesirable In antiquity there were typically two reasons that barrenness was undesirable. The first, which isn't really an issue in this text had to do with the security of the future. Children were the ancient equivalent of a retirement plan since there were no pensions, social security, etc. Therefore, the only ones to care for ...


4

We can only take the literal meaning of the word of the word we find in the text. Wherever a word can have two meanings it should generally be read as normally used in the Greek language. The word used in both Matthew and Mark is ἀκρίς which translates as grasshopper.


4

This is going to sound a little esoteric, but my belief is that He was doing things backwards compared to the way we do them to symbolize His coming to us. The way we come to God, we first come to the faith, and then accept His sacrifice. Afterwards we get baptized, and then the Holy Spirit tabernacles with us. I'm using this language for a reason. It's the ...


3

Tertulian (being a Roman) would have used a Roman calendar system of dating reigns of emperors. So, the part year of AD 14 would have been considered Tiberius' accession, and AD 15 would have been year 1, and so on. Hence the Lord would have been revealed in AD 26. It would have referred to his baptism in the year that John began baptising, and by the time ...


3

John was not saying that he did not recognize Jesus as the Messiah in the way that we do not perceive or recognize a person's identity, like an old acquaintance or relative, but instead that Jesus had received recognition not from him (John), but from heaven that he (Jesus) was the Christ. The Greek word εἴδω is used the same way that we use the word "...


3

Abstract John is not part of the Kingdom of Heaven because his role is to point to and prepare the way for it. Jesus is speaking in the language of eschatology and not in the framework of modern Christian theology. The context of the passage is that John has been imprisoned by Herod: Now when John heard in prison about the deeds of the Christ, he ...


3

Lk 1:57, where Elizabeth gives birth, comes after Lk 1:56, where Mary leaves. Though this in itself is not conclusive evidence that Mary left before John was born, it is an indication. Furthermore, Lk 1:58-36 talk about how Elizabeth's neighbors reacted, and how her relatives who had just heard the good news reacted, and how Zachariah reacted - there is ...


2

Lots of discussion on this subject. But if i may clarify on the key question. Although previous scripture indicates that John knew Jesus as a great teacher, a prophet, and perhaps even as one defined as the Messiah by his mother and aunt, the statement in John, Chapter 1:29-34 declares that until the moment of confirmation wherein the prophesy from God was ...


2

I've always interpreted this as that Jesus was referring to the Baptism of the Spirit. John never received the Baptism that Jesus was offering (John even asked Jesus at the time of Christ Baptism that he would baptize him). I think John didn't necessarily want 'water' baptism, but the 'spirit' baptism that Christ only could offer. I think that when Christ ...


2

The Hebrew Bible makes mention that Elijah will appear before the "great and terrible day of the Lord" (Mal 4:5). That is, Elijah was to turn the hearts of Israel for healing (Mal 4:6). The Hebrew Bible makes mention that "the voice in the wilderness" was to prepare the way before the coming of the Lord (Is 40:3). John the Baptist claimed to be this voice (...


2

It would first be useful to define what the "Kingdom of Heaven" is. In this verse, "Kingdom of Heaven" refers the the ecclesiastical government of the church, which is the kingdom of heaven on earth[1]. If you examine the Greek: καὶ βιασταὶ ἁρπάζουσιν αὐτήν. (kai biastai harpazousin autēn) "and [the] violent (violent men) seize (take it by force) it ("her")...


2

One thing is sure – Augustus died in AD 14 and Tiberius succeeded him. From that anchor point, we must resolve the ‘contradiction’ between Luke and Tertulian by concluding that: Either Luke or Tertulian was mistaken, (or) Both are right, but they begin counting from different start-points. I believe the latter option - Tertulian counts from AD 14, and ...


2

Many commentaries suggest that "the other disciple" appears to have been John (that is, the author of the same Gospel). Some hold the view the disciple perhaps may have been Philip, or Thomas. The identity of the second of the Baptizer’s disciples is not mentioned in this pericope. Naturally a great deal of speculation has arisen as a result of this ...


1

There are several reasons why Jesus was baptized. I will explain two reasons which will include Jesus' answer to John as to what " to fulfill all righteousness means" (Matt 3:15). First, it was Christ's public anointing as King. John the Baptist (JTB) came in the spirit of Elijah, but it's hard to miss the similarities of his and Samuel's ministry. Author A....


1

Short answer: The two disciples of John the Baptist seem to be Andrew (per John 1:40) and John the Apostle. John’s Gospel: One key point in trying to identify the two disciples of John the Baptist is that, in writing the fourth Gospel, John the Evangelist/Apostle never names himself. As Gill says, he “always chooses to conceal himself”. The only point in ...


1

Yes, at least one is. In John 1:37 the two disciples follow Jesus, then in 1:40: One of the two which heard John speak, and followed him, was Andrew, Simon Peter's brother. Andrew went and fetched his brother Simon and said (1:41), "We have found the Messiah." As for who the other disciple was, the gospel does not tell us, and it seems beyond ...


1

It does not seem that John the Baptist could possibly have been a member of the community of Qumran (which we assume was occupied by the Essenes). The very reason the community withdrew to this remote site was to avoid contact with those less holy than themselves. This is explained in the Community Rule papyrus: The Community Rule - 1Q5-col V.1-3: (...


1

John the baptist knew when he was in his mother womb. It says in Luke 1:41-44: and it came to pass, that when Elisabeth heard the salutation of Mary, the baby leaped in her womb; and Elisabeth was filled with the holy ghost. And she spake out with a loud voice, and said, blessed art thou among women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb. And whence is ...


1

It must be kept in mind that when Jesus uses the phrase "kingdom of God" or "kingdom of heaven," He is not referring generically to what moderns call "heaven." He is referring to the reign of God in His Messiah. This is why Jesus tells His hearers that the kingdom is "among" them in Luke 17:21. (Not "in"; the Greek is en and can mean either; here Jesus is ...


1

Lets take a deeper look at what is said through Malachi Remember the Law of Moses, My servant, Which I commanded him in Horeb for all Israel, With the statutes and judgments. (Malachi 4:4 NKJV) So he asks us to focus our attention to the time of the commandments Which is Exodus 20. When they said. Then they said to Moses, “You speak with us, and we ...


1

In this instance, the Levites are coming to see exactly what rabble John is rousing and if this affects their power. Should it threaten them, more than likely John would have seen a fate similar to that of Jesus at the hands of the Sanhedrin. Therefore John cannot claim to be Elijah or a prophet. Yet in the same breath, he does claim to be a prophet. Shortly ...


1

The text says nothing about confusion or doubt. John knew from his infancy that Jesus was the promised Messiah. He knew from Jesus' baptism that He was also the God's Son, the King. But kings, messiahs, never do miracles. As Frank says, many Jews interpreted the prophecies to mean that both a new David and a new Moses would come. But was Jesus also the new ...



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