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8

[JPS translation and verse numbering throughout, unless otherwise noted] Joel is a short book (just three or four chapters depending on how their broken up), rich with themes of eschatology, repentance, redemption and a very sardonic description of famine: Awake, ye drunkards, and weep, and wail, all ye drinkers of wine, because of the sweet wine, for ...


6

The bridge that connects Jesus the Nazarene as "Yahweh" is Isaiah 8:13-14, which both Paul (in Romans 9:33) and Peter (in 1 Peter 2:6-8) use to make the nexus between "calling on Jesus" and "calling on Yahweh" to be saved. First, in Psalm 118:22 we find an unqualified mention of a stone "which the builders rejected" that in turn "became the chief ...


5

The tanakh contains several references to God's "spirit" (ruach). This spirit sometimes "comes" (1 Sam 16:13) or "hovers" (Gen 1:2). Twice it is "poured", once in Joel (per the question) and once in Isaiah 44:3: כִּי אֶצָּק-מַיִם עַל-צָמֵא, וְנֹזְלִים עַל-יַבָּשָׁה; אֶצֹּק רוּחִי עַל-זַרְעֶךָ, וּבִרְכָתִי עַל-צֶאֱצָאֶיךָ. For I will pour water ...


4

Your question seems to be rhetorical. Most likely, of course, Jesus knew the prophecy of Joel. Did he quote it? Very likely, even if we can not pin it down. Not all is written down. The book Revelation quotes it often. (It is said to be inspired by him. Apk 1, 1) There is a difference between the two situations in which persons would call on the Name of ...


4

[JPS translation and verse numbering throughout, unless otherwise noted] Chapters 1 and 2 - Locust Chapters 1 and 2 describe a plague of locust: What the locust swarm has left the great locusts have eaten; what the great locusts have left the young locusts have eaten; what the young locusts have left other locusts have eaten (1:4). ...


4

It could simply be a physical description of what the moon looks like. Have you ever seen the moon during a lunar eclipse (when the moon moves into the shadow of the earth)? It becomes red (or brown or yellow) because some of the sunlight passes through the earth's atmosphere and bends around the earth to reach the moon. The actual colour of the moon ...


4

I agree with this answer that one primary referent would be water, but would not limit it to that. I suggest that in this outpouring and its description, there are allusions to the linked concepts of both anointing and baptism (e.g. levitical washings etc). The latter suggests water; the former suggests oil, which was poured upon the head of priests and ...


3

Excellent reasons have been given for a pre-exilic authorship of the book of Joel. I wanted to present some of the reasons for a post-exilic authorship. The temple is standing, and the priesthood is active. (1.9,13,16; 2.17) This could certainly apply to the pre-exilic period, but of course could also apply to the post-exilic. 'Israel' is mentioned by name ...


2

The heavens is often used to express powers of governments while the earth is the populations under them. For example, long after the heavens and earth were literally established, God uses the same phrase in establishing Israel: And I have put my words in your mouth and covered you in the shadow of my hand, establishing the heavens and laying the ...


2

The first two valleys use the word "emek". The names appear to be purely symbolic in context though the Jehosaphat valley might be associated with a historical event connected with the king of the same name, see Wikipedia. Most of the traditional commentators say that the valleys in 4:12 and 4:14 (Yehoshaphat and "Decision") are the same valley. The name in ...


2

I'm currently reading Edmund P. Clowney's Preaching Christ in All of Scripture. In it he quotes C. H. Dodd: Wherever the term Kyrios, Lord, is applied to Jehovah in the OT, Paul seems to hold that it points forward to the coming revelation of God in the Lord Jesus Christ.—The Epistle of Paul to the Romans, 169. Note that Kyrios is a Greek word, ...


2

In his epistle Peter mentions again the immanency of "the end times" (1 Pet 4:7), and of course the imagery of the Book of Revelation captures in vivid imagery the end of the world. In other words, the end of the world is part of the Day of the Lord, to which Peter alludes in Acts 2:16-21. As in the imagery of day in the Bible, the beginning of the day ...


2

The phrase "in the last days" is the sign that Peter sees his words as an end-times prophecy. This is an interpretive take on Joel 2:28 because both the original Hebrew and Greek Septuagint say "And it shall come to pass afterwards..." (As an aside, this means that Luke is not working from the Septuagint here to put words in Peter's mouth.) The paraphrase ...


1

The prophet Joel is drawing upon imagery and concepts from Ezekiel (who had in turn drawn from his predecessor Jeremiah), and the following paragraphs will help to tie the thoughts all together. First, the Day of Pentecost happened to be the same day when the Law of Moses was given on Sinai (Feast of Weeks). That is, the Book of Acts indicates that the New ...


1

When we seem to face contradiction, it sometimes comes from different meanings of words. (I also appreciated sarah's pointing out the grammar in the Y that came to precede the Hoshea which became in transliteration Iesous (Septuagint Greek for Joshua and Greek for Yehoshua, that is Jesus)). An important aspect to consider may be this one, in addition: ...



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