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The Hebrew text of Job 6:14 runs as follows: לַמָּ֣ס מֵרֵעֵ֣הוּ חָ֑סֶד וְיִרְאַ֖ת שַׁדַּ֣י יַעֲזֽוֹב׃ lammās mērēʿēhû ḥāsed, wəyirʾat šadday yaʿăzôb Ambiguity has long been recognized as one of the "features" of the Hebrew of the book of Job.1 That enters into the picture here, although there are other issues, too. Context The book of Job has a ...


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Job lived 140 years (Job 42:16), a long life, similar to the patriarchs. For that reason it is said that he lived during the period of the patriarchs. During the patriarchal age, the head of the family also covered the function of offering sacrifices. In other words, he was the priest of his family. (1) So Job, conceived by the writer as living in ...


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The Idea in Brief There are three words in the verse which provide ambiguous meaning, however, the Masorah Parva of the Masoretic Text helps to shed light to the verse. In spite of these difficulties, the MT can be seen to yield good sense. Discussion The first and most significant problem in the verse is the word for "friend." If the Hebrew word is רֵעַ, ...


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I think this is basically a question about English usage. The Hebrew original has בָּאָרֶץ which you could translate in modern English either as “on the earth” or as “in the land”. It depends really on how you want to understand the word אָרֶץ . In pre-modern English the preposition “in” is not rarely used where in modern English you would have to say “on”. ...


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The Idea in Brief The margin notes of the Masoretic Text (Masorah Parva) as annotated in the Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia provide amplified understanding of the text. That is, the Masoretic editors had understood that Job would see God both within his body (verse 26), and without his body (verse 27). Discussion The Masoretic Text has margin notes, which ...


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Contributor sbunny is on the right track, I believe. The "sons of God" are angelic beings. Satan himself was an angel who was cast out of heaven when he rebelled against God. Whether the sons of God are fallen or unfallen angels, I will not speculate. Notice in the account of God's meeting with the sons of God and Satan we find the words "present ...


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Short Answer No, the Bible does not teach that the earth is flat. Authorial Intent If we want to understand what the Bible teaches, we have to start by asking what the authors were trying to communicate to their original intended audiences. We can not start with our own questions and try to "see what the Bible says about it". This is something you learn ...


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The Hebrew word that's translated as ring/earring is נֶזֶם (Nezem). It can mean either ring, earring, nose ring, or generic ornament. I believe that the last translations translations are more correct, since there are places like Exodus 35:22 where נֶזֶם and טַבַּעַת (ring worn on a finger) are used in a single verse. It seems that these nose/ear rings are ...


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The meaning of Job 4:21 becomes apparent when looked at in context. Eliphaz is dreaming (4:13) and hears a voice saying, "Shall mortal man be more just than God? Shall a man be more pure than his maker?" The voice then argues that such an idea is absurd. (4:13-21*): In thoughts from the visions of the night, when deep sleep falleth on men, Fear came ...


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The general consensus, according to my research, is that the sons of God are angels in Job 1:6. John Gill's exposition explains this better than I could. Now there was a day when the sons of God came to present themselves before the Lord,.... This is generally understood of the angels, as in Job 38:7 who may be thought to be so called, because of their ...


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My persuasion is that the Masoret (with mitigated revision due from Dead Sea Scrolls) is the only biblically authoritative text for the books Genesis to Malakhi. It is a mistake and even pointless to think about English/Latin grammatical concepts in order to accurately resolve the actual intention of the Hebrew text. To map Hebrew grammatical elements to ...


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If you would have quotes the specific Bible version then it would have helped. For instance I always prefer NKJV, Job 2:2 NKJV reads as 'And the Lord said to Satan, “From where do you come?" Satan answered the Lord and said, "From going to and fro on the earth, and from walking back and forth on it."' Other few common versions may read Satan's reply as: ...


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Since Satan, the accuser, does not want to believe in Job's blamelessness, he seeks to depreciate or impugn Job's character by saying in effect, "Job's so-called blamelessness is attributable to a bargain he made with you, God. It's an even exchange: He'll be blameless if you give him the lifestyle to which he's become accustomed." In other words, ...


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Job is a very difficult text to accept without exercising one's total faith in GOD. Certain points of the text seem to defy logic as the outcome of Jobs' testing would certainly not prove anything to Satan that would cause him to repent, or avow his error--at least not from Scripture (and we know Satan's eventual ending). Other questions arise as to how ...



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