Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

The Hebrew text of Job 6:14 runs as follows: לַמָּ֣ס מֵרֵעֵ֣הוּ חָ֑סֶד וְיִרְאַ֖ת שַׁדַּ֣י יַעֲזֽוֹב׃ lammās mērēʿēhû ḥāsed, wəyirʾat šadday yaʿăzôb Ambiguity has long been recognized as one of the "features" of the Hebrew of the book of Job.1 That enters into the picture here, although there are other issues, too. Context The book of Job has a ...


6

Job lived 140 years (Job 42:16), a long life, similar to the patriarchs. For that reason it is said that he lived during the period of the patriarchs. During the patriarchal age, the head of the family also covered the function of offering sacrifices. In other words, he was the priest of his family. (1) So Job, conceived by the writer as living in ...


5

No Certain Answer to Give Disclaimer and Explanation of Citations and Notations: The evidence here is largely gleaned from Protestant source material (my tradition), and is presented in a way that argues toward Job being an ancient composition (my view); but the evidence also mentions there are numerous other views on this. A bibliography of all ...


4

The Idea in Brief There are three words in the verse which provide ambiguous meaning, however, the Masorah Parva of the Masoretic Text helps to shed light to the verse. In spite of these difficulties, the MT can be seen to yield good sense. Discussion The first and most significant problem in the verse is the word for "friend." If the Hebrew word is רֵעַ, ...


3

The Idea in Brief The margin notes of the Masoretic Text (Masorah Parva) as annotated in the Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia provide amplified understanding of the text. That is, the Masoretic editors had understood that Job would see God both within his body (verse 26), and without his body (verse 27). Discussion The Masoretic Text has margin notes, which ...


2

The meaning of Job 4:21 becomes apparent when looked at in context. Eliphaz is dreaming (4:13) and hears a voice saying, "Shall mortal man be more just than God? Shall a man be more pure than his maker?" The voice then argues that such an idea is absurd. (4:13-21*): In thoughts from the visions of the night, when deep sleep falleth on men, Fear came ...


2

Short Answer No, the Bible does not teach that the earth is flat. Authorial Intent If we want to understand what the Bible teaches, we have to start by asking what the authors were trying to communicate to their original intended audiences. We can not start with our own questions and try to "see what the Bible says about it". This is something you learn ...


2

The Hebrew word that's translated as ring/earring is נֶזֶם (Nezem). It can mean either ring, earring, nose ring, or generic ornament. I believe that the last translations translations are more correct, since there are places like Exodus 35:22 where נֶזֶם and טַבַּעַת (ring worn on a finger) are used in a single verse. It seems that these nose/ear rings are ...


1

Since Satan, the accuser, does not want to believe in Job's blamelessness, he seeks to depreciate or impugn Job's character by saying in effect, "Job's so-called blamelessness is attributable to a bargain he made with you, God. It's an even exchange: He'll be blameless if you give him the lifestyle to which he's become accustomed." In other words, ...


1

Job is a very difficult text to accept without exercising one's total faith in GOD. Certain points of the text seem to defy logic as the outcome of Jobs' testing would certainly not prove anything to Satan that would cause him to repent, or avow his error--at least not from Scripture (and we know Satan's eventual ending). Other questions arise as to how ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible