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I would interpret this verse in a spiritual sense rather than a physical sense. One meaning of the word name is 'authority' another is 'character', and that is what I see as being meant here. Look at this quote: For this bible study this is an important consideration, because it reveals another fundamental aspect what Jesus was talking about when he ...


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Definitions The question is "interested in the terms 'primary' and 'secondary' in the technical sense they would be used by a professional historian." Wikipedia defines primary sources as original materials that have not been altered or distorted in any way. In the study of history as an academic discipline, a primary source (also called original source or ...


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To discern what constitutes a "primary" source requires asking some research question or other: a "primary source" is any evidence which bears on the question's answer or solution; a "secondary source" is any assessment (or interpretation) of that evidence. In the absence of such a question (and subsequent argument in attempting to answer it), nothing or ...


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Jesus is referring to when he multiplied the bread and fish in John 6:1-14. He is making commentary on the fact that people are seeking him in order to receive more food rather than observing the signs that confirm his being the Messiah, the latter being that which they ought to be doing. Let's take a look at the context of John 6:26. [25] When they ...


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The lexical form of the word of interest in προσποιέω. It is inflected here as a third person aorist verb in the middle voice. At the linked LSJ entry section II gives usages “mostly in [the middle voice]”. Subsection 2 gives the basic meaning: take to oneself what does not belong to one, pretend to, lay claim to This resonates with the components of ...


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The only definition offered for φάντασμα by the very comprehensive A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament (BDAG) is "apparition, especially ghost". As such, we should be cautious of any other interpretation. None-the-less, let's examine the evidence for (near) contemporary belief in ghosts: A common belief: evidence Meyer's Commentary suggests that ...


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I should think that the language in which you pray to your God and father in a dire situation at the end of your life would probably be your primary language, no? And since he was quoting a passage that he would have only been exposed to from Hebrew or Greek scriptures and yet spoke them in Aramaic it gives further evidence that his native tongue was ...


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What Language Did Jesus Speak Most Often? The scholarly consensus is clear on this issue: Jesus' native tongue was Aramaic, specifically a Galilean dialect of Aramaic. Why Were Jesus' Words Recorded In Greek? It is simple to understand why the Gospels were written in Greek. Most of the communities of early Christians were Greek-speaking; this was ...


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Moses' cosmology did not include what we refer to as "planets". There was the greater light (the sun) the lesser light (the moon) and the stars. What we know as the planets of our solar system they referred to as "wandering stars" (PLANHTHS ASTHR) because, well, they looked like stars but moved. Venus appears in the East in the morning and in the West in the ...


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In "On the City of God against the Pagans" (De Civitate Dei Contra Paganos), Book 21, Ch. 24, Augustine wrote, For some of the dead, indeed, the prayer of the Church or of pious individuals is heard; but it is for those who, having been regenerated in Christ, did not spend their life so wickedly that they can be judged unworthy of such compassion, nor so ...


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The symbolic language Jesus used in John 6:53 strongly points to Leviticus 17:10-11. Lev 17:10 “‘Any man of the house of Israel, or of the strangers who live as foreigners among them, who eats any kind of blood, I will set my face against that soul who eats blood, and will cut him off from among his people. Lev 17:11 For the life of the flesh is in the ...


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The Greek tenses apropos the Passover, are Present - here the idea of a repeated act act consonant with repeating weekly. The Greek tenses in Jhn.6 are aorist, consonant with one-off action. Also 'flesh' (Jhn.6: Gk. sarx) does not equal 'body' (Mt.26: Gk. sōma). Jhn.6 carries the idea of one-off conversion to messiah; the Passover passages (Synoptics + ...


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The answer to your question can be found in other passages Scripture: Jesus Christ was not above Scripture, thus he could not cross the bounds of what was preordained to occur, set forth, by His Father (God). More specifically, He came to fulfill certain prophecy. Everything that occured had a set time to happen and could not happen an instance before that ...


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In my eyes, Judas' kiss is a picture of their friendship. Hence, Jesus says "Do what you came for, friend." This idea of friendship and brotherhood placed side by side with the betrayal aspect amplifies the hurt and pain Jesus would feel and go on to feel later on. (Although, the ultimate pain was when God the Father turns His face away from Jesus, Jesus ...



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