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I think this is an excellent question. Community-Thanks for making this active again today. To me this brings in numerous perspectives and teachings; it can reference many parts of Scripture. Regarding the word “heart” this goes back to Genesis and reasons for the Flood, in Genesis 6:1-7. The men then “took wives” as they chose, but I’m not sure that ...


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Most commentary on this passage (and Mt 12:25) stumbles on the rather misleading translation of "ἐνθυμήσεις" into English as "thoughts". In ancient Greek philosophy, "thumos" was quite distinct from a person's intellect (nous, noeo, noema) or reason (logizomai). Thumos, according to Liddell and Scott, is "soul, spirit, as the principle of life, feeling and ...


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No, Jesus did not subject Himself to the law of the land by paying the temple tax. For one thing, the temple tax (see Exodus 30:12 ff.) was not a law of the land, but it was a law of Moses imposed on the "sons of Israel" both as a ransom for them and for the maintenance of the "tent of meeting" (i.e., the tabernacle). By paying the temple tax Jesus was ...


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The textual variants are ἰδὼν and εἰδώς. According to Tischendorf, ἰδών is the well attested variant. ἰδών is a participle declined in the aorist tense, active voice, nominative case, masculine gender, and singular number. It is derived from the aorist tense verb εἶδον. εἰδώς is a participle declined in the perfect tense, active voice, nominative case, ...


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Your question immediately brought to my mind a verse in John's Gospel which precedes what is perhaps the most famous chapter in the Bible, save perhaps for Psalm 23. Here is the verse in context: "Now while Jesus was in Jerusalem at the feast of the Passover, many people believed in his name because they saw the miraculous signs he was doing. But Jesus ...


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Short Answer: "Two swords will be sufficient" fits the semantics, but has significant contextual difficulties. "Enough!" fits the broader context better, but has other significant difficulties. The best explanation seems to be that Jesus was not thrilled with their interpretation of His instructions, but this wasn't clear to them until after the fact, and ...


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What is being “judged” in 2 Corinthians 5:10? 2 Corinthians 5:10 For we must all appear before the judgment seat of Christ; that every one may receive the things done in his body, according to that he hath done, whether it be good or bad. In the preceding verse Paul makes reference to his labors (ministry). To me the context is similar to what is ...


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This encounter was specifically sat up to restore Peter. He was initially called to follow Jesus after the Lord borrowed his boat. Sowing into Christ's ministry in this way yielded the remarkable catch of fish. After which Peter, James and John forsook their nets and followed Him. This encounter is the same: a calling to once again return to His work. But ...


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The context of the verse gives us clues as to who and what is being judged. Paul has just finished talking about his ambivalence about which is better: being here on earth in his earthly tent (i.e., our corruptible bodies) or being with Christ in heaven eternally, inhabiting a "house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens" (5:1). Paul is torn because ...


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There are several lines of speculation as to who the Nicolaitans were, but no real evidence. It does seem that they were an early Christian sect, of whom John of Patmos says the Lord disapproved. H. A. Ironside (http://www.a-voice.org/library/nicolait.htm) says a commonly held view is that they were followers of Nicolaos, mentioned along with Stephen as ...


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I'll speak briefly to the statement in John, as I have neither the time, energy, or site policy to also tackle the hotly contested apocalypse and theological synthesis. (And I'm pecking away on a smartphone here.) Jesus is not saying that Satan was now going to be geographically kicked out of "heaven" or the "earth". He was referring to the spiritual ...



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