Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

This is a question that exercised the minds of many Christians in the post-apostolic era. Richard Valantasis says in The Beliefnet Guide to Gnosticism and Other Vanished Christianities,page 64, that when Marcion of Sinope (c 85-160 CE) read the scriptures of the Old and New Testaments, he could not understand how the vengeful, judgemental and angry God of ...


1

Your question, though good, is not a new one. Antagonists to both Judaism and Christianity have asked the same question--with minor variations--for years. Even adherents from both religious traditions are in no small measure at a loss to explain the apparent discrepancy between the “God of the Old Testament” and the “God of the New Testament” (viz., Jesus of ...


0

Easy. The word translated as "hate" simply means "to love less than" or "to have lesser priority than". It does NOT mean what our modern word "hate" means. In fact Jesus in Matthew 15:4 reiterated the command to "love" father and mother.


0

Jesus' command to hate your father and mother in Luke 14:26 I agree with Jed that the context is in response to the guy who declared; Luke 14:15 And when one of them that sat at meat with him heard these things, he said unto him, Blessed is he that shall eat bread in the kingdom of God. This guy was making what he probably thought was a pious, ...


7

Granville Sharp's first rule (p. 3) does not apply to John 20:28 because of the presence of the definite article before the second substantive (noun). καὶ ἀπεκρίθη Ὁ Θωμᾶς καὶ εἶπεν αὐτῷ ὁ κύριός μου καὶ ὁ θεός μου Now, in regards to the sixth rule, Granville Sharp wrote (pp. 14-16): In response to the Socinian claim, he wrote, Except ...


1

In Luke 6, are we to take Jesus' words about our enemies literally? Are we to stand and get beaten for his name's sake? Are we to truly give when we are stolen from? I say yes. To walk as Christ walked is very difficult and only done by His Spirit which leads and guides and empowers us. Have you ever seen a person reach out in forgiveness to someone that ...


1

Did Jesus give in to political pressure by paying the temple tax as recorded in Matthew 17? Jesus gave an explanation in his answer; Matthew 17:27a Notwithstanding, lest we should offend them... This principle we can see also given by Paul; Romans 12:18 If it be possible, as much as lieth in you, live peaceably with all men. The instruction ...


1

In one way, yes they are, but literally they are not the same. Looking at four different accounts, in context, we can see so many similarities that they must surely be versions of the same account, yet there are important differences: Mark 14:3-5,7 (KJV): "And being in Bethany in the house of Simon the leper, as he sat at meat, there came a woman ...


0

Did Jesus have the legal authority to cleanse the temple? Luke 19:46 Saying unto them, It is written, My house is the house of prayer: but ye have made it a den of thieves. Jesus had the legal right of ownership. However, no one in power would recognize this. People obeyed Roman law because they knew if they didn't they would be killed. In the ...


1

Mt 26:39-40: He went a little farther and fell on His face, and prayed, saying, “O My Father, if it is possible, let this cup pass from Me; nevertheless, not as I will, but as You will.” Then He came to the disciples and found them sleeping. A few options occur to me: (1) the disciples heard the beginning of the prayer and understood its gist, but were ...


4

In Mark 11:27-12:44, Jesus is in the temple, where the Pharisees, scribes and Sadducees try to trick him into error, with one question after another. The question of the Sadducees is divided into three parts: 12:19 is a quotation from Deuteronomy; 12:20-22 is the narrative of a case; and 12:23 is the trick question by which they hope to catch him. The ...


2

Tertullian, in Against Marcion, Book 2, Ch. 10 writes, This description, it is manifest, properly belongs to the transgression of the angel, and not to the prince's: for none among human beings was either born in the paradise of God, not even Adam himself, who was rather translated there; nor placed with a cherub upon God's holy mountain, that ...


1

There are two questions here. One is on the 'literalism' of the text. The other is contingent on the first but stands alone as something like, "Jesus wasn't God, was he?" First question, yes. Jesus' teachings in the "Sermon on the Mount" section (5:1-7:23) are not parable nor are they allegorical. The trouble is in the definitions. So, if I may, I think it ...


5

I think we can make an educated, intelligent guess as to where Jesus was when the word came to him from Bethany that Lazarus was ill. First, we know that when Jesus received the word from Bethany that his friend Lazarus was ill, Jesus and his disciples were somewhere in Perea, engaging in what scholars call--fittingly enough--his Perean Ministry. They ...


2

In John 11:2, Jesus receives word that Lazarus is sick; John 11:6 still only refers to Lazarus as sick, although Lazarus could have died soon after the messengers left Mary and Martha. From this, the story implies that Jesus was at least one full day's walk away from Lazarus. John 10:40 places Jesus on the eastern side of the Jordan River, a location ...



Top 50 recent answers are included