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Jesus is quoting a version of Psalm 8 that corresponds to the Septuagint (Greek translation), which does contain significant variations from the Masoretic (Hebrew version). The Masoretic is used for most versions of the Christian Old Testament in English. The Septuagint was completed roughly two centuries before Jesus did his teaching. Psalm 8.31 εκ ...


7

The Bible Answers this as "No" Quoting you (all quotations are from prior to editing the "tone" of the question): Is the Urantia Book ("White Stone") foretold in The Book of Revelation 2:17 ? There is no textual evidence to link the "white stone" symbol to the Urantia Book. Such a connection is an arbitrary assertion. Of course, because we are ...


6

Restricting oneself to the most literal of meanings is often wrong in any language. We cannot simply say "what does this word mean at its root?" We must go on to ask "how was this word used in this verse?" That the preferred form for a Roman cross was indeed a vertical stake with a crosspiece is well established in history. Stauros could mean "cross" more ...


6

The similar command in Matthew 10:37 shows that the ancient world understood this saying of Jesus to be not complete hatred (37 "Anyone who loves their father or mother more than me is not worthy of me; anyone who loves their son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me"). There is no reason to assume an Aramaic source for the Gospels based on this ...


6

A supplement to Mark Edward's answer: Though "strength" and "praise" are two very different words, the "strength" in Ps 8 in the Hebrew text comes from "mouths", and the psalm is about praising God. It is not a stretch to think that the psalm talks about praise from the infants' mouths. Moreover, the New Testament seldom quotes the Old Testament word for ...


6

When comparing John 20:30-31 to other early Christian texts, it appears 'Christ' and 'son of God' (and 'Lord') were understood as synonyms when used for Jesus. The two terms appear in conjunction somewhat regularly1, a few you have already noted in a comment above. The reason for why the two phrases are so often used in relation to each other probably ...


6

I am an amateur at this, but I think that 2 Samuel 23 gives us a big clue as to how to interpret Jesus' remarks. Jesus's language appears to be the same language used by David who refused to drink of the water that the soldiers brought him because they had risked their lives to bring it to him, and what they brought to David was not worth them losing their ...


5

Short Answer: Many have come up with various numerological interpretations of the number 153 in John. I believe this to be reading into the text things not intended by the author. As the two previous answers to this questions illustrate well, this numerological method allows for several different interpretations of the same passage. Each of the words in ...


5

There are two key points to pick up on in 1 Peter 3.19-20, bold here: ἐν ᾧ καὶ τοῖς ἐν φυλακῇ πνεύμασιν πορευθεὶς ἐκήρυξεν ἀπειθήσασίν ποτε, ὅτε ἀπεξεδέχετο ἡ τοῦ θεοῦ μακροθυμία ἐν ἡμέραις Νῶε κατασκευαζομένης κιβωτοῦ εἰς ἣν ὀλίγοι, τοῦτ’ ἔστιν ὀκτὼ ψυχαί, διεσώθησαν δι’ ὕδατος (NA28) The author is talking about: spirits (πνεύμασιν) who disobeyed ...


5

Jesus is being compared to John the Baptist by the Pharisees in that John ate sparingly and only things such as locust and honey and drank no wine. Jesus ate pretty much whatever he wanted to and drank wine, and was accused of gluttony and being a winebibber or drunken, because of this. They thought John the Baptist diet strange and too controlled, but when ...


4

Jesus had the legal authority to cleanse the temple not because he was a rabbi but because he claimed to be like Solomon, the "Son of David" and thus the builder of God's house (2 Samuel 7). This is evident from a careful reading of the gospels through the lens of the Hebrew Bible. In the synoptics the temple cleansing is immediately preceded by Jesus' ...


4

Jesus' statement in Luke 23:43 is not so much about the afterlife or what's required of us to get into heaven. It's primary purpose is to depict Jesus' death as undoing the curse of Adam. Luke presents Jesus as a new Adam. This is beyond a doubt the purpose in Luke's placement and arrangement of Jesus’ genealogy. Unlike Matthew who places his genealogy ...


4

Jesus was born under the law to fulfill the law (Gal. 4:4-5)… He was bound to it in His life and to rebel against it would be to sin. Also note that the point of these versus when read in context was not to promote tithing, but to promote matters of the heart and show hypocrisy on the parts of the Pharisees. When read aloud and in context no-one will point ...


4

[Summarized from Brad Young's Jesus, the Jewish Theologian, pp. 114-116.] Divorce and remarriage are permitted under Jewish law, and Jesus did not prohibit the two acts. However, many Christians have made divorce and remarriage for any reason the same as adultery. There are even Christian denominations which do not allow their ministers to be remarried (the ...


4

Wikipedia has an article with a section specifically about the historicity of the Abgar legend (emphasis mine): The Abgar legend has played an important part in the self-definition of several Eastern churches, but its historicity is extremely doubtful. Two recent histories of the Church of the East, Baum and Winkler's The Church of the East and David ...


4

From International Standard Bible Encyclopedia This is the favorite self-designation of Jesus in the Gospels. In Matthew it occurs over 30 times, in Mark 15 times, in Luke 25 times, and in John a dozen times. It is always in the mouth of Jesus Himself that it occurs, except once, when the bystanders ask what He means by the title (John 12:34). ...


4

The Hebrew Bible is a treasure trove of truth, and provides the lens through which to understand this passage regarding the Greeks seeking Jesus. First, the triumphal entry into Jerusalem resonated not with the Feast of Passover & Unleavened Bread (springtime), but the Feast of Tabernacles (autumn). That is, when the people took boughs and palm branches ...


4

I may not fully understand your question, and it's difficult to parse what you're seeking, but the evidence would indicate that this story was actually a "stock trope" that Jesus leveraged to teach his audience about how to value people above possessions. In the below answer I attempt to address (Luke's) "authorial intent" in the way that he organized the ...


3

I wrote a letter to a friend once that may better shed light on the subject: According to scripture Jesus makes use of the words tithe, or tithing, only 3 times (Mat. 23:23, Luk. 11:42, and Luk. 18:12). It is of interesting note that on all three occasions Jesus actually cursed the tithe payer. In fact in all three instances He downgrades the importance of ...


3

In Ps. 69:21 it says,"They gave Me also gall for My meat; and in My thirst they gave Me vinegar to drink." This is after the Psalmist says in vs 9,"For the zeal of thine house hath eaten Me up; and the reproaches of them that reproached thee are fallen on Me." Both scenes were witnessed in the life of Jesus: when He drove out the moneychangers out of the ...


3

Every instance of the word cross in the New Testament--save for a couple instances of the word in the phrase cross over--is stauros, which has been a Greek masculine given-name for quite awhile (analogous, I suppose, to the surname Taylor being derived from tailor, Smith from [black]smith, Cooper from cooper, etc. The cross to which our Lord was impaled by ...


3

The author of Hebrews is not identifying Melchizedek as a pre-incarnate appearance of Jesus or what have you, but as a type or pattern for Jesus' priesthood. Argument From Chronology The first thing to note is that this passage is a reflection on the Melchizedek narrative in Genesis through the lens of Psalm 110, which was introduced back in 5:6 ...


3

I will answer the first part of the question by referring to John Owen's condensed (Crossway Christian Classics) explanation: First, Melchizedek was a mere man and no more than a man. For “every high priest is selected from among men” (5:1). So the Son of God himself could not have been a priest if he had not assumed our nature. If Melchizedek was more ...


3

My understanding is that Jesus was really challenging the view of woman in the current society even having a serious conversation with a woman. And he, as you note, did have woman disciples: Some time afterward he went on through towns and villages, preaching and proclaiming the good news of the kingdom of God. The twelve were with him, and also some ...


3

There are some who assert that a change in speaker from Jesus to the author John occurs in John 3:13. The evidence that John is speaking from John 3:13 forward is the change from first-person to third-person. See related: To whom should we attribute John 3:16? Ultimately, it comes down to translator bias or assumption since the original manuscripts were ...


3

From the highly contested Aramaic Primacy wing, Christopher Lancaster, in his Concise Compendium offers the following insight on page 57, under subtitle number 7 "hate" or "put aside" The answer lies in the Aramaic word [transliterated] sone' sone' to put aside to hate to have an aversion to So with this in mind, the more correct ...


3

Mark is without doubt the most straightforward of the gospels. The book is short and engaging. It is more critical of the disciples than the other gospel, often in a humorous way. Often Mark includes details that Matthew and Luke choose to leave out, i.e. that the grass was green when the 5000 sat down to eat. Mark often chooses a few stories and tells ...


3

The word "world" (κοσμος) can have a number of meanings other than "every human being without exception," which is how it is often taken. A.W. Pink maintained that there are 7 uses for the word "world" and John Own offered (I believe) 16. In John's gospel there are a few meanings present, ranging from "every human being without exception" to "all nations of ...


3

This is a very good question because it illustrates the sharp contrast between the learning styles of then and now. And if thou see a man of understanding, go to him early in the morning, and let thy foot wear the steps of his doors. [37] Let thy thoughts be upon the precepts of God, and meditate continually on his commandments: and he will give ...


3

The time Jesus was on earth, specifically during +-3.5years of ministry he was sent to the lost sheep of the house of Israel (Matt 15:24). Not that he didn't minister to any gentiles at all, but the Israelites were his primary mission. When you read the passage, the Greeks came to Philip. Instead of simply bringing them to Him, Philip goes and gets Andrew, ...



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