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5

I agree with the general consensus here that there probably isn't a great deal of meaningful semantic distinction between Χριστὸς Ἰησοῦς and Ἰησοῦς Χριστὸς. However, there's an incidental morphologic irregularity that explains at least some of the variation. In NT Greek, the dative form of Ἰησοῦς is Ἰησοῦ, identical in form with the genitive.1 This leads ...


2

As defined by Wikipedia, Atonement (in the Christian sense) refers to the forgiving or pardoning of sin in general and original sin in particular through the death and resurrection of Jesus, enabling the reconciliation between God and his creation. This concept of atonement is at the heart of modern Christian theology. Both GThomas and the hypothetical 'Q' ...


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In 1st Corinthians 14:21, Paul quotes Isaiah 28:11 and refers to it as 'The law' This widens the concept of just what the law is. I think that the same thing happens in Romans 3:19. One thing that we can know is this; Jesus did not make a mistake when He referred to the Psalms as the law...this tells me that we are safe to expand our concept of the term....


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Traditionally, all of the Tanak can be referred to as Torah. The word "Torah" is a tricky one, because it can mean different things in different contexts. In its most limited sense, "Torah" refers to the Five Books of Moses: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy. But the word "torah" can also be used to refer to the entire Hebrew Bible (...


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To assume that it is a fabrication, is an option, however, it is not the only or best option, given the contemporary witnesses to substantiate these claims, given the acceptance of Luke's gospel by those apostles who were there at that time, given the values and ethics of the followers of Jesus. Instead, let's look at some others much more plausible reasons: ...


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Έπιστάτης appears in the NT only in Luke (5:5; 8:24, 45; 9:33, 49; 17:13). In case except the last, the word appears on the lips of a disciple. Marshall, in this NIGTC calls the make of the last reference a near disciple (203). Marshall agrees with Oepke’s TDNT article (II, 622f.) that the word is a translation of the Palestinian Aramaic, רַבִּי. Marshall ...


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If I understand what you've said correctly, then I think we both have a similar interpretation. Yeshua had just finished telling the disciples not to judge. When somebody lives an immoral life or does things contrary to "my" morality, it's hard not to judge them. I think the problem comes from this idea that Christianity is "the most obvious religion", ...


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When I.H. Marshall comments on the Mary/Martha story in Luke he indicates that a female student would be rare. I have a recollection of a lecture by Amy Jill-Levine who indicated that there is some evidence for female students of Rabbis, but I've not actually come across many citations in my studies since then. Even if it were to be demonstrated true, its ...



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