Hot answers tagged

44

If it did refer to something that was merely difficult, the immediate reaction of the disciples would be incomprehensible: 26And they were exceedingly astonished, and said to him, "Then who can be saved?"   ESV As would Jesus' response: 27Jesus looked at them and said, "With man it is impossible, but not with God. For all things are ...


37

The idea of the "eye of the needle" being a gate apparently had its origins in the Middle Ages. From The Straight Dope: Next, the history and archaeology. The notion your Baptist friend has picked up apparently comes from a single ninth-century commentary which asserts that in first-century Jerusalem there was a gate called the Needle's Eye which a ...


30

Palestine at the time of Jesus was something of a crossroads for culture and language. It's entirely possible a young man growing up in the region would have been exposed to at least four different languages: Greek, Aramaic, Latin, and Hebrew. Aramaic Far and away the most common language that Jesus is quoted in is Greek. But that seems largely due to the ...


23

There's a condition known as Hematidrosis, which has reportedly occurred in people other than Jesus. It could be metaphorical, but the "easy reading" of that passage suggests it's not, and I don't know that there's any outside sources to suggest that we shouldn't take it to mean he literally sweat blood.


20

Jon gives a good answer as to why Jesus would have been able to speak Greek, Aramaic, and Hebrew. He also asked for more information regarding the existence of Hebrew in the Land at the time of Jesus. Mishnaic Hebrew was very well known in the first century and was distinguished from Aramaic in such works as the Letter of Aristeas and Josephus. See below for ...


19

Translation From the Apostolic Bible: Your first question is in regards to the translation. It seems that all three would be pretty valid translations. The original Greek for "the beginnings" here is arche: Strings G746 1. beginning, origin 2. the person or thing that commences, the first person or thing in a series, the leader 3. that by ...


19

No, I don't think we are dealing with a case of "Oh, this doesn't line up with everything else Jesus said, therefore..." However, I will say we need the entirety of Luke 14 to make sense of this gnarly truth that Jesus is making. To start off, don't overlook the fact that Luke 14:26 includes more than family members - it also includes ourselves - If ...


17

I think you have it right there in the difference between what you quoted - the Lord's Prayer doesn't say "do not tempt us" (and James agrees as to why) and James does not say "God does not allow people to be dragged away and enticed" (which would make the world a very different place). A prominent example of God explicitly allowing someone to be tempted is ...


17

Yes. This is a predicate nominative construction. That is, both θεὸς (God) and ὁ λόγος (the word) are in the nominative case, and they are joined by an equative verb (here, a form of "to be"). John 1:1 (NA28): Ἐν ἀρχῇ ἦν ὁ λόγος, καὶ ὁ λόγος ἦν πρὸς τὸν θεόν, καὶ θεὸς ἦν ὁ λόγος. In English, we generally distinguish the subject (S) from the predicate ...


16

The Pharisees were trying to trap Him. They thought they had an air tight dilemma. If Jesus says "pay the taxes," it will turn the common people (the people of the land) against Him. It would also turn the zealots against Him. If He said, "don't pay taxes," then the Herodians (agents of the king) have it from His mouth that He is fomenting rebellion. If ...


15

First, to recap, Jesus had just made some pretty huge claims, culminating in the one you quoted in v30. They Jews were incensed by this, and about to stone him for blasphemy, when he went with the "not guilty" plea, and used this quote from Psalm 82 as his defense. His argument is this: If God himself (speaking through the Psalmist) can refer to another as ...


14

No. The tetragrammaton was not used in Jesus' time. Faithful Jews would avoid saying it so as to not transgress the third commandment. The most common circumlocution was "Lord" (Andonai in Hebrew or Kurios in Greek), though he might also be referred to simply as "Heaven." In answer to Jesus using El from the cross. El is the common word for God from all ...


13

One thing to remember here is that Luke was a physician. He knew (should have known?) his symptoms. This does not preclude the metaphoric interpretation, but it does give the literal interpretation a lot more credence in this case. Even if it was not something he had seen before, it makes it far less likely that he would describe it this way in error.


12

Short Answer: There is strong evidence from Scripture that they actually received the Spirit at Pentecost, and that what we see in John 20:22 was Jesus giving them a visual illustration and command in preparation for that event. The Controversy For reference, here is the statement in question: He breathed on them and said to them, “Receive the Holy ...


12

The similar command in Matthew 10:37 shows that the ancient world understood this saying of Jesus to be not complete hatred (37 "Anyone who loves their father or mother more than me is not worthy of me; anyone who loves their son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me"). There is no reason to assume an Aramaic source for the Gospels based on this ...


12

The NET Bible includes this textual criticism note: Several important Greek mss (Ì75 א1 A B N T W 579 1071*) along with diverse and widespread versional witnesses lack 22:43-44. In addition, the verses are placed after Matt 26:39 by Ë13. Floating texts typically suggest both spuriousness and early scribal impulses to regard the verses as historically ...


12

This is a big question and I think it will help to refactor it into some related questions: What did Jesus see as his mission? From the passages you cited and the fact that Jesus spent most of his time teaching Jews, it's not a stretch to say that Jesus saw his mission as limited to Israel. Now Jesus did go into the region of the Decapolis, which began as ...


12

While some have argued for some kind of symbolism in the number shown here, there is no direct support from the text. The notes from the Net Bible indicate the following direct implications: This may have been a larger-than-average catch (especially in context of the following phrase - the net didn't tear under the load) This may be indicative of blessing ...


12

Short Answer: Many have come up with various numerological interpretations of the number 153 in John. I believe this to be reading into the text things not intended by the author. As the two previous answers to this questions illustrate well, this numerological method allows for several different interpretations of the same passage. Each of the words in ...


11

---- Answer just looking at Luke 14:26 ---- According to Thayler's lexicon, (as I understand (in the below scan) .. people in the culture were really much like modern Italians and Greeks, and it was common to both love and hate something at the same time, so the greek word used could be interpreted 'love less than': Also from Vine's Expository Dictionary ...


11

I found out that "camel" in Aramaic can mean "thick rope made out of camel-hair". This seems like a natural interpretation to me, because the rich man is like a coarse rope, and the entrance to the kingdom of heaven is like a small needle, and the coarse rope will not pass. It makes the parallel more explicit, and it is more eloquent (although less ...


11

Who are the morning stars? From the text, I would say the morning stars are the sons of God that are mentioned. This passage seemed to follow a common parallel format found in the surrounding text. Look at the repetitious nature of the surrounding passages for my reasoning: 5 Who determined its measurements—surely you know! Or who stretched the line ...


11

There have been several proposed reconciliations of the Matthew and Luke genealogies. Among the popular ones are: Matthew's genealogy traces legal heirs; Luke's traces biological ancestors. Matthew's genealogy traces the ancestry of Joseph; Luke's traces the ancestry of Mary. This view takes the phrase "as was supposed of Joseph" in 3:23 as a parenthetical ...


10

My reading of the Gospels—especially Mark—is that Jesus operated in grey territory from the perspective of human authority. For instance, right at the beginning of his ministry, the people were amazed at his authority: And they were astonished at his teaching, for he taught them as one who had authority, and not as the scribes. —Mark ...


10

Every commentary I could find has seemingly a different interpretation on this passage! I have however, managed to distil these down into two main interpretations: 1. Jesus was going to pass them by, but was diverted The phrase "meant to" in the ESV and RSV is also translated "would have" in the KJV. The Greek word used here is thelō which means to wish or ...


10

Jesus is quoting a version of Psalm 8 that corresponds to the Septuagint (Greek translation), which does contain significant variations from the Masoretic (Hebrew version). The Masoretic is used for most versions of the Christian Old Testament in English. The Septuagint was completed roughly two centuries before Jesus did his teaching. Psalm 8.31 εκ ...


10

The Bible Answers this as "No" Quoting you (all quotations are from prior to editing the "tone" of the question): Is the Urantia Book ("White Stone") foretold in The Book of Revelation 2:17 ? There is no textual evidence to link the "white stone" symbol to the Urantia Book. Such a connection is an arbitrary assertion. Of course, because we are ...


10

The Phrasing is Not a Direct Comment on Jesus being over 40 Years Old Irenaeus is in error with his logic here, partly because he is missing the context and particular significance of the statement. Background Rather than being a direct comment on Jesus' age (i.e. over 40 years old), the number 50 is stated because of its significance in Levitical ...


10

The translation of Ἀποκάλυψις Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ is certainly "the revelation of Jesus Christ." The real question is whether the genitive phrase should be understood as a subjective genitive or objective genitive. Subjective genitive: "the revelation of Jesus Christ" (ἀποκάλυψις Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ) is understood as "what Jesus Christ reveals" (ὃ ἀποκαλύπτει ὁ Ἰησοῦς ...


9

The letter gimel has the meaning of a 'rich man chasing after a poor man' (1) and camel is gamal, an obvious pun. The rich young ruler had just chased after Jesus (a poor man) and played a game of threading the needle. This is where the law is defined by the individual so that he finds himself narrowly avoiding a violation of the law in his own eyes. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible