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Most English translations use "our righteousness" as you pointed out. The NIV's rendering is a motivated translation. Since they see this verse as a prediction of Christ, they are trying to make that clear to the casual reader. In other words, "Savior" comes from their theology, not the text. Edit per response: The context does lend itself to a ...


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The kaf is the third radical (i.e., part of the root), not part of the suffix. The word of interest is אֽוֹלִיכֵם. This is a hifil imperfect first common singular* from הלך with a third masculine plural suffix, tsere-mem. (The he is not generally part of the 3mp suffix on imperfect forms.) The un-suffixed form ends in a kaf: אוֹלִיךְ. I will make them ...


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Scholarly consensus is that both the Jeremiah and Obadiah oracles you mention are drawn from an anonymous source earlier than either, rather than that either one is "plagiarizing" directly from the other. This scenario would be similar to the hypothesis of the Q source as the common origin for similar sayings by Jesus in Matthew and Luke. See, for example, ...


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Like you said, He gives Jeremiah a severe warning It is commonly said that God's people are "a God Fearing People", this means that they fear and respect God, He has power to destroy His enemies, So they should do what God commands them to do. In this specific passage, God is telling Jeremiah that his faith in God is what will save them. If God's ...


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The name of the prophet is יִרְמְיָה (Jer. 28:6), יִרְמְיָהוּ (Jer. 1:1), and יִרְמִיָה (Dan. 9:2). A relatively accurate transliteration of these names would be Yirmeyah, Yirmeyahu, and Yirmiyah, respectively.



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