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James 1:1 In James 1:1 we read: James, a bondservant of God and of the Lord Jesus Christ, To the twelve tribes which are scattered abroad: Greetings. (Jam 1:1 NKJ) This introductory greeting informs the readers that the writer is called 'James' and he considers himself to be a slave of both God and the Lord Jesus Christ. In itself, this greeting ...


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The short answer to OP's question regarding the teaching in James 2:10: Is it in the torah? is: "No". A much longer answer discusses James's teaching as derived from Jesus (depending on Douglas Moo), and the essentials are given there. It is important to note, however, that this understanding of the law (i.e., breaking one bit is like breaking the ...


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The best explanation is that the text is saying exactly what it appears to be saying. Vine's entry, for example, on the root αἰτέω says to ask," is to be distinguished from No. 2. Aiteo more frequently suggests the attitude of a suppliant, the petition of one who is lesser in position than he to whom the petition is made; e.g., in the case of men in ...


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James explains the reasoning employed in verse 10 in the immediately following verses: For he who said, "Do not commit adultery," also said, "Do not murder." Now if you do not commit adultery but do commit murder, you have become a violator of the law. (Jas 2:11-12 ESV) James is expressing the Jewish view (shared by Romans) that the law was ...


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A full "list" of specific "actions" cannot be made. Life is too complicated for that. However, the context you quote itself mentions two things that point to what is meant generally. Note the bolded parts from the quote: What good is it, dear brothers and sisters, if you say you have faith but don't show it by your actions? Can that kind of faith save ...


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This is a snippet from the Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary: A double minded man,.... A man of two souls, or of a double heart, that speaks and asks with an heart, and an heart, as in Psalm 12:2 who halts between two opinions, and is at an uncertainty what to do or say, and is undetermined what to ask for; or who is not sincere and upright in ...


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The original Greek is rightfully translated as 'one another' in this verse. 253 ἀλλήλων (allēlōn), dat. οις (ois), acc. ους (ous): prn. (reciprocal); ≡ Str 240—LN 92.26 each other, one another;a pronoun which marks reciprocation between two persons or groups (Jn. 13:34–35; Ro. 12:10, 16; 1Co. 12:25; Eph. 4:2, 32; Heb. 10:24; Jas. 4:11; 5:9, 16) (A ...


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The Idea in Brief The meaning is to know why. That is, in faith we are to ask why we are suffering, and in faith we will receive the answer. Discussion Viktor Frankl once quoted Friedrich Nietzsche as follows - “He who has a why to live for, can bear almost any how.” I can see in these words a motto which holds true for any psychotherapy. In the Nazi ...


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This is Knox's translation from the Vulgate: 14 Of what use is it, my brethren, if a man claims to have faith, and has no deeds to shew for it? Can faith save him then? 15 Here is a brother, here is a sister, going naked, left without the means to secure their daily food; 16 if one of you says to them, Go in peace, warm yourselves and take your fill, ...



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