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The question as posed by OP -- concerning aspects of the "πολύσπλαγχνος + οἰκτίρμων" pair in James 5:11 -- has all the seeds of its own answer. First, the relevant bit of text: NA28 ... πολύσπλαγχνός ἐστιν ὁ κύριος καὶ οἰκτίρμων. NRSV ... the Lord is compassionate and merciful. I'll take the interrelated sub-questions in a slightly different order. ...


4

The Greek phrase is μὴ ὀνειδίζοντος, which is the negative particle μὴ followed by the present tense, active voice, participle ὀνειδίζοντος declined in the singular number, genitive case. ὀνειδίζοντος is conjugated from the verb ὀνειδίζω. This verb occurs 10 times in the Textus Receptus (Estienne, 1551). BDAG defines the verb ὀνειδίζω as, ① to find fault ...


4

It has been noted that the epistle of James has several small, but substantial, overlaps in thought and language with the 'sermon on the mount' (the Matthew version, not so much the Lukan 'sermon on the plain'). In the case of James 5.12, we see significant degree of overlap with this Jesus logia: Again, you heard that it was said to the ancients, ...


4

It sounds to me like the phrase χόρτου ἄνθος ("blossom/flower of the grass/meadow") is drawing on the Hebrew expression צִיץ הַשָׂדֶה, "blossom of the meadow", which is used several places in the TaNaKh as an expression of the passing of time and the ineluctability of our mortality. See Psalms 103:15-16, or Isaiah 40:6-8. I don't think it's referring ...


3

The principal meaning of the Greek word κύριος is "master," and this meaning, I believe, is the one most frequently associated with the word by all NT authors alike. Certainly there are some instances where κύριος is being used as the equivalent to the Tetragrammaton יהוה, but these are the minority. Paulos certainly does not always (nor even mostly) use ...


3

It's both: a general statement and a practical action. In the context, James likens a Christian's friendship with the world (the cosmos, in which are the lust of the flesh, the lust of the eyes, and the pride of life--1 John 2:16) to spiritual adultery. For a Christian to have one foot in the church and one foot in the world is a contradiction in terms. ...


3

Good question. One possibility is that you are complaining that the law has not properly judged and punished this brother. Think of how the elder brother begrudged his father's forgiveness of the prodigal when he returned. But I suspect we are missing something about Jewish legal interpretation here. The Law (Torah) is holy, the word of God, and by ...


2

Where does the diatribe with the imaginary interlocutor that begins in v. 18 end? An imaginary “someone” (τις) addresses James in v. 18. In doing this James has introduced a dialog with a straw man (an interlocutor) as his chosen form of diatribe. We can assume that at some point James responds to this interlocutor with a rebuttal otherwise it would be a ...


2

James is a practical Epistle. Sometimes under the guise of general principles and theology a person can evade the forcefulness of the scripture and James in some ways avoids general principles (as dangerous as that could be at times) to pin down the hypocrite, who does not live according to them though may be very conversant about them. As such is the case, ...


2

When dealing with James, my amateur opinion is that much can be made of reading the entire context of James. First, we can refer immediately to the preceding verse, 1:10. James is writing about the rich person, singular: ploucioc / G4145.+ As Noam Sienna answered, correctly, the reference of the fading flower is to mortality. Because 1:10 named a ...


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You might be interested in Zane Hodges' interpretation of this verse, as presented in his books The Gospel Under Siege, The Epistle of James: Proven Character Through Testing, and in The Grace New Testament Commentary. Basically, Hodges says that the objector's response goes from vv 18-19, and it is meant to be a reductio ad absurdum. Here is how he ...


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These verses are all about cultural context and considering that the written book of James was intended to be read aloud; it is an address. I agree quite a bit with the answer of swasheck, but my translation would differ as follows: The τις of 2:18 could refer to a straw man, but that straw man would be a close facsimile to his living contemporary Rabbis ...


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I think your question is theological and belongs elsewhere. However, your question contains a nugget of Hermeneutics. Also, I believe the accepted answer is mistaken. James is clearly stating that the Prayer recorded at Jesus' Sermon on the Mount should be amended or clarified. In Greek, he uses a nearly matching phrasing which he states that no person ...



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