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17

I think you have it right there in the difference between what you quoted - the Lord's Prayer doesn't say "do not tempt us" (and James agrees as to why) and James does not say "God does not allow people to be dragged away and enticed" (which would make the world a very different place). A prominent example of God explicitly allowing someone to be tempted is ...


14

I wrote a paper on James 2:14-26 a few years back. Here's a link. TRANSLATION 14: What (is) the benefit, my brothers and sisters, if someone claims to have faith but does not have works? That faith is not able to save them (is it)? 15: Suppose a brother or a sister is naked and lacking of daily bread, 16: and someone from you (pl.) says to them, “Go ...


8

"Justified" has the same meaning in each verse. You have to look at those verses in the larger context to understand what the authors are referring to by "works" and how that relates to justification. James 2:14-26 makes the point that true faith always leads to works. The clearest statements are in verses 17 and 26: 17 Even so faith, if it has no ...


6

James 1:1 In James 1:1 we read: James, a bondservant of God and of the Lord Jesus Christ, To the twelve tribes which are scattered abroad: Greetings. (Jam 1:1 NKJ) This introductory greeting informs the readers that the writer is called 'James' and he considers himself to be a slave of both God and the Lord Jesus Christ. In itself, this greeting ...


6

The question as posed by OP -- concerning aspects of the "πολύσπλαγχνος + οἰκτίρμων" pair in James 5:11 -- has all the seeds of its own answer. First, the relevant bit of text: NA28 ... πολύσπλαγχνός ἐστιν ὁ κύριος καὶ οἰκτίρμων. NRSV ... the Lord is compassionate and merciful. I'll take the interrelated sub-questions in a slightly different order. ...


5

It sounds to me like the phrase χόρτου ἄνθος ("blossom/flower of the grass/meadow") is drawing on the Hebrew expression צִיץ הַשָׂדֶה, "blossom of the meadow", which is used several places in the TaNaKh as an expression of the passing of time and the ineluctability of our mortality. See Psalms 103:15-16, or Isaiah 40:6-8. I don't think it's referring ...


4

The principal meaning of the Greek word κύριος is "master," and this meaning, I believe, is the one most frequently associated with the word by all NT authors alike. Certainly there are some instances where κύριος is being used as the equivalent to the Tetragrammaton יהוה, but these are the minority. Paulos certainly does not always (nor even mostly) use ...


4

It has been noted that the epistle of James has several small, but substantial, overlaps in thought and language with the 'sermon on the mount' (the Matthew version, not so much the Lukan 'sermon on the plain'). In the case of James 5.12, we see significant degree of overlap with this Jesus logia: Again, you heard that it was said to the ancients, ...


4

I believe that "brother" in this sense represents fellow believers - specifically he was writing to some Jewish believers. I understand this from "James, a bond-servant of God and of the Lord Jesus Christ, To the twelve tribes who are dispersed abroad: Greetings. " (Jas 1:1) The Church as a whole can apply this epistle to itself and it's members because we ...


4

It's a good question. Unfortunately the answer appears to be that it's just really unclear. We know what James is arguing, but exactly how is a little more problematic. Leading people to look at different ways of handling the "quote" James gives. Moo gives a nice little section in "James: An Introduction and Commentary" in Tyndale. But I think his ...


4

The Greek phrase is μὴ ὀνειδίζοντος, which is the negative particle μὴ followed by the present tense, active voice, participle ὀνειδίζοντος declined in the singular number, genitive case. ὀνειδίζοντος is conjugated from the verb ὀνειδίζω. This verb occurs 10 times in the Textus Receptus (Estienne, 1551). BDAG defines the verb ὀνειδίζω as, ① to find fault ...


3

The short answer to OP's question regarding the teaching in James 2:10: Is it in the torah? is: "No". A much longer answer discusses James's teaching as derived from Jesus (depending on Douglas Moo), and the essentials are given there. It is important to note, however, that this understanding of the law (i.e., breaking one bit is like breaking the ...


3

Short Answer: It is a new thought, not a summary statement. The Source of the Command in 5:12 The book of James was written "To the twelve tribes who are dispersed abroad" (1:1) and insists upon such things as looking "intently at the perfect law . . . not having become a forgetful hearer but an effectual doer" of that law. He insists that "whoever keeps ...


3

Good question. One possibility is that you are complaining that the law has not properly judged and punished this brother. Think of how the elder brother begrudged his father's forgiveness of the prodigal when he returned. But I suspect we are missing something about Jewish legal interpretation here. The Law (Torah) is holy, the word of God, and by ...


3

Is he a brother? Yes However, he's not a brother in the sense of a "fellow believer", but merely in the sense of a "fellow man". Let me explain in full: Word choice There does seem to be some confusion with the wording here: James 1:9-10 (ESV)Emphasis added Let the lowly brother boast in his exaltation, and the rich in his humiliation, because ...


2

When dealing with James, my amateur opinion is that much can be made of reading the entire context of James. First, we can refer immediately to the preceding verse, 1:10. James is writing about the rich person, singular: ploucioc / G4145.+ As Noam Sienna answered, correctly, the reference of the fading flower is to mortality. Because 1:10 named a ...


2

Where does the diatribe with the imaginary interlocutor that begins in v. 18 end? An imaginary “someone” (τις) addresses James in v. 18. In doing this James has introduced a dialog with a straw man (an interlocutor) as his chosen form of diatribe. We can assume that at some point James responds to this interlocutor with a rebuttal otherwise it would be a ...


2

James is a practical Epistle. Sometimes under the guise of general principles and theology a person can evade the forcefulness of the scripture and James in some ways avoids general principles (as dangerous as that could be at times) to pin down the hypocrite, who does not live according to them though may be very conversant about them. As such is the case, ...


2

The phrase "νόμου ἐλευθερίας μέλλοντες κρίνεσθαι" reads as "(the) law of freedom being about to be judged". Where this "law of liberty" comes into being is from John 13:34, A new commandment I give unto you, That ye love one another; as I have loved you, that ye also love one another. Whereas the Law could be summed up in commandments,(Matt. ...


2

You might be interested in Zane Hodges' interpretation of this verse, as presented in his books The Gospel Under Siege, The Epistle of James: Proven Character Through Testing, and in The Grace New Testament Commentary. Basically, Hodges says that the objector's response goes from vv 18-19, and it is meant to be a reductio ad absurdum. Here is how he ...


2

Joachim Jeremias in New Testament theology p.202 says that it means 'do not let me fall victim, not to everyday temptations, but to the last great trial'. He says that Jesus expected his mission to lead to a time of terrible widespread suffering before God's reign starts, and therefore the disciples are to pray to be protected from apostasy.


2

James explains the reasoning employed in verse 10 in the immediately following verses: For he who said, "Do not commit adultery," also said, "Do not murder." Now if you do not commit adultery but do commit murder, you have become a violator of the law. (Jas 2:11-12 ESV) James is expressing the Jewish view (shared by Romans) that the law was ...


2

The best explanation is that the text is saying exactly what it appears to be saying. Vine's entry, for example, on the root αἰτέω says to ask," is to be distinguished from No. 2. Aiteo more frequently suggests the attitude of a suppliant, the petition of one who is lesser in position than he to whom the petition is made; e.g., in the case of men in ...


2

This is a snippet from the Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary: A double minded man,.... A man of two souls, or of a double heart, that speaks and asks with an heart, and an heart, as in Psalm 12:2 who halts between two opinions, and is at an uncertainty what to do or say, and is undetermined what to ask for; or who is not sincere and upright in ...


2

A full "list" of specific "actions" cannot be made. Life is too complicated for that. However, the context you quote itself mentions two things that point to what is meant generally. Note the bolded parts from the quote: What good is it, dear brothers and sisters, if you say you have faith but don't show it by your actions? Can that kind of faith save ...


2

There are (at least) four issues that must be dealt with in order to sufficiently answer this question, and much ink has been spilled on all of these issues. Issue 1: Context (and identification) of the scripture being cited If the author of James is citing another text, then understanding the original context of the quoted passage may shed some light on ...


1

The Idea in Brief The meaning is to know why. That is, in faith we are to ask why we are suffering, and in faith we will receive the answer. Discussion Viktor Frankl once quoted Friedrich Nietzsche as follows - “He who has a why to live for, can bear almost any how.” I can see in these words a motto which holds true for any psychotherapy. In the Nazi ...


1

This is Knox's translation from the Vulgate: 14 Of what use is it, my brethren, if a man claims to have faith, and has no deeds to shew for it? Can faith save him then? 15 Here is a brother, here is a sister, going naked, left without the means to secure their daily food; 16 if one of you says to them, Go in peace, warm yourselves and take your fill, ...



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