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14

Joseph's sons were Ephraim and Manasseh, Gen. 41:51 Joseph called the name of the firstborn Manasseh: “For God has made me forget all my toil and all my father’s house.” Gen. 41:52 And the name of the second he called Ephraim: “For God has caused me to be fruitful in the land of my affliction.” These became, in a sense, Jacob's sons: Gen. ...


11

When the Tanakh uses different names for the same individual, it sometimes reflects different aspects of the subject. Consider the different names of God, which reflect aspects like judgment or mercy or nurturing. Yaakov (Jacob), too, has two names, so it's worth looking at how they're used. This explanation, which in turn cites this one, offers the ...


11

This is just by way of postscript and supplement to a (good!) answer already provided. The lists of tribes given in the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament typically are as @Niobius describes: Joseph's sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, replace both Joseph and Levi, most obviously in the tribal settlements during the "conquests" of Joshua/Judges. This is also how they ...


11

When scripture refers to Yehuda ("Judah") and Yisra'el ("Israel") in the same verse, it is often because it is not referring to individual tribes (of which Yehuda was one), but rather, the two kingdoms into which the people of Yisra'el were split during the reign of King Rechav'am ("Rehoboam"), the son of King Shlomo ("Solomon"). This fracture was a ...


7

Gen 22:17 That in blessing I will bless thee, and in multiplying I will multiply thy seed as the stars of the heaven, and as the sand which is upon the sea shore; God promised Abraham that his descendants would be as the sand of the sea, and as the stars of heaven. These two metaphors are in direct apposition to each other, and explain each other. The ...


7

...I am the Lord, and I will bring you out from under the burdens of the Egyptians, and I will deliver you from their bondage, and I will redeem you with an outstretched arm, and with great judgments; and I will take you to Me for a people, and I will be to you a God; and ye shall know that I am the Lord your God, who brought you out from under ...


6

Addressing the question in the title: The Hebrew phrase b'nei Yisrael refers to Jews (the sons of Jacob and all their descendants -- plus converts even though they technically aren't sons of Jacob). You usually see it in this form -- Israel, not Jacob. The only Tanakh uses of b'nei Yaakov (Jacob) I can think of are either referring to his sons ...


6

Here is the list of 12 tribes of Israel from Genesis, Numbers and Revelation: Genesis 29-30 Numbers 1 Revelation 7 Reuben Reuben Reuben Simeon Simeon Simeon Levi Levi Judah Judah Judah Dan Dan Naphtali Naphtali Naphtali Gad Gad ...


6

By way of supplementing and extending the answers already provided for this question: As noted elsewhere in this Q&A, the kingdom that was united under the thrones of Saul, David, and Solomon, split in the aftermath of Solomon's reign into distinct "nations": one in the north, and one in the south (narrated in 1 Kings 12). When the two designations ...


5

Rashi says that the angel didn't change his name, only said that a name change would be coming. In trying to understand why he says that, I found an interesting, subtle difference in the text in the two passages. Rashi's commentary Rashi on 32:29 says (emphasis mine): no… Jacob: It shall no longer be said that the blessings came to you through ...


5

Meaning of κόκκῳ σινάπεως This is more or less just some additional information, Mike's answer is good. According to the IVP NT Commentary series: Scholars still dispute what plant is meant by the “mustard seed.” Nevertheless, by no conjecture is it the smallest of all seeds that Jesus’ listeners could have known (the orchid seed is smaller); the ...


5

It may likely grow into the Sinapis Nigra (Black Mustard). It can grow to eight feet tall, so it could actually be literally used by small birds to nest on its branches. However parables are not to be taken so literally and the image may be a slight exaggeration as part in parcel with the point of the passage. In the OT mustard is not mentioned. Yet ...


4

The phenomenon described in II Kings 3:20-23 is well known in the area. Rain can fall in the higher areas such as Edom (now Jordan) or in the Judean hills while down in the Jordan valley on either side of the river, the sky is clear and sunny. When this happens, the wadis (gulleys) that drain the uplands erupt suddenly in flash floods that endanger ...


3

Although Niobius' answer is good, it misses a bit of the point. G-d gives a childless Avram two metaphors to understand (a) that he would have a lot of progeny, and (b) that they had both tremendous potential to achieve great heights and also to suffer great lows. First, let me give you a fascinating look into how the Jewish Midrashic tales from the Torah ...


3

In Gen 15:5 God promises Avram that his seed shall be as numerous as the stars. It doesn't say "his seed living at any one time"; the straightforward reading is that it means all of them. The 603,550 men counted in the desert census (Num 1:46) are from but one generation. Since descendants of Avraham continue to be born to this day, we have not yet ...


3

Using the reference at hand: JPS Torah Commentary on Deut, page 273, note on the verse: Mekelburg and some modern commentators suggest reading ho-`oniyyot as "in mourning, in a lamentful condition." They understand `oniyyot as `anniyyot, an abstract plural of `anniyah, 'mourning, lamenting'. The footnote, in turn, reads: Meklenburg; NEB; Mayes: ...


3

Shlomo ("Solomon"), the son of David, continued to go whoring after gods other than YHVH (1 Kings 11:1-10). This was exacerbated by his numerous foreign wives of whom God warned Shlomo that they would cause him to go astray and commit idolatry. Consequently, YHVH told Shlomo that he would rend the kingdom from him, except that He would leave one tribe (the ...


3

The plain meaning of why the Torah suddenly calls Yaakov by his alternate name Yisrael again instead of writing "the time approached for Yaakov to die," (which would have been the natural sequence to the line: "Yaakov lived in the land of Egypt for seventeen years") is that ever since he had been given the additional name the Torah uses both names ...


3

The simple answer is yes to your question, they are the same. Nebuchadnezzar attacked Jerusalem 3 times and he took captives when he did so. God also promised to keep the captives safe and prosper them. This is Nebuchadnezzar the second who reigned from 605 BC – 562 BC, while Nebuchadnezzar the first reigned from 1126–1103 BC. So there isn't a son with the ...


3

They are certainly referring to the same individual. The name is the same Briefly addressing this point. The name for 'Nebuchadnezzar' is spelled a variety of ways in Hebrew, sometimes ending with 'rezzar', but even within the book of Jeremiah we find alternate spellings: -rezzar נבוכדראצור: Jeremiah (1) נבוכדראצר: Jeremiah (28), and Ezekiel (4) ...


2

First of all, Genesis 49:16 says that Dan will provide justice for Israel and be a serpent along the roadside, a viper that will bite at the horses heel. All this means is, that Dan will protect Israel from those who will attempt to do harm to Israel. It's funny, that when people see the word serpent they immediately refer to it as being something evil. ...


2

I think this parable means something totally different. A previous parable about the Parable of the Sower explains the 'birds' as the evil ones (Matt 13:19). Idioms in the Bible are consistent. Therefore, the mustard seeds starts in faith then something happens (false teaching - birds being evil ones, false preaching) and it becomes something that it was not ...


2

There are many ways to determine the quantity of occurrences of a particular phrase in the Bible. The way I often do it is: Go to www.blueletterbible.org. You will see a box under "Bible Dictionary/ Search." Within quotes, type in the word or phrase you would like to search for. For example: "God of Israel." This will yield results for that exact phrase. ...


2

The Hebrew word ישׂראל iysra’el; comes from two root words. The first is שׂרה sara,'to prevail' or have dominion. The second is אל ’el usually translated as God. The idea is that the name reflects the wrestling that Jacob had with God. The only question before us is the 'prevailing' and 'wrestling unto prevail' God's over Jacob or Jacob's over God? ...


2

This answer offers a subtle but significant adjustment to Joseph's helpful offering. OP's main question is: Why is the masculine pronoun "him" used to describe Israel in this passage? The central answer to this question is that "Israel" is always "masculine, singular" in biblical Hebrew. One of the basic studies of this phenomenon is by J.J. Schmitt, ...


2

Verse 10 starts a paragraph in the Hebrew, and the following verse (v. 11) mentions "Jacob" in parallel... That is, Israel = Jacob, which is a masculine name. So the context of verses 10-11 refers to the faithful remnant of Israelites in both the northern and southern kingdoms (="Jacob"), who will be reestablished through the New Covenant (Jer 31:31). In ...


2

Many, including myself, have been perplexed by the apparent omission of the tribe of Dan from the list of "all" the tribes of Israel in Revelation 7:5-8. This has led to much speculation in an attempt to explain this strange occurrence. A possible explanation alluded to in the Pulpit Commentary is that Dan was omitted due to a scribal error. Looking at the ...


2

We may look first to the first tribe mentioned in the list of Revelation, which is the Tribe of Judah. this is interesting because Reuben should have been first, but we will remember from Hebrew history that Reuben lost his position of first because of his gross immortality and thus it was given to Judah. Genesis 49:8-10: (8) Judah, thou art he whom ...


2

The Masoretic translation makes the verse easier to understand: 'None have beheld iniquity in Jacob, Neither hath one seen perverseness in Israel' 'perverseness' can alternatively be translated as 'calamity' - so Rabbi Hertz Then we read: Because there are no gross-injustice (iniquity) in Israel God remains on their side and visit no calamities on them. ...


2

Nebuchadnezzar was the king of Babylon, who attacked and defeated Jerusalem. He brought some of the Hebrews back to Babylon, including Daniel. This is the setting of the book of Daniel, told in Daniel 1:1-7. This alone may help to answer it seems odd that the king would simultaneously place an Israelite at the top of his >administration and attack his ...



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