New answers tagged

5

The basic answer to your question: Why does the Septuagint omit Isaiah 2:22 when it's in the Dead Sea Scrolls and Leningrad Codex? is of course: because the Septuagint was not translated from the Dead Sea Scrolls or the Leningrad Codex. That said, the more satisfying answer will be harder to come by. As in most cases where we see a discrepancy ...


-3

"heaven" is just an old way of saying "sky". In the scriptural cosmology the "sky" is not "the universe" but rather a solid structure that is above the dry land. It supported part of the waters of the original abyss: Gen 1:6 Then God said, "Let there be a canopy [a solid structure] between bodies of water, separating bodies of water from bodies of ...


0

While the two passages have some superficial resemblance they are actually rather different: YLT: Isa 6:1 In the year of the death of king Uzziah--I see the Lord, sitting on a throne, high and lifted up, and His train is filling the temple. YLT: Isa 52:13 Lo, My servant doth act wisely, He is high, and hath been lifted up, And hath been very ...


0

Because the question asked the original author's intent it seemed that only the author himself could provide an authoritative answer so I took the liberty of writing to the author and asking him to respond. Here is his response: Writing on John 12.41 it seemed to me clear that the language about seeing his glory and speaking of him was a reference to ...


2

Since the similarity between them is, as you point out, more thematic than linguistic, it may be useful to examine if this theme exists before and outside of Amos and Isaiah. Earlier Examples of this Theme The Psalms and Proverbs offer several instances that seem to be the beginnings of these sentiments: Psalm 50:23 The one who offers thanksgiving as ...



Top 50 recent answers are included