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The New Testament does not specifically give the details all of the wounds Jesus experienced1: When He had said this, He showed them His hands and His side. Then the disciples were glad when they saw the Lord. (John 20:20) Then He said to Thomas, “Reach your finger here, and look at My hands; and reach your hand here, and put it into My side. Do not ...


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Isaiah 52:14 doesn't seem to match the NT in the sense of Jesus being the mutilated servant: there is no indication in the NT at all that Jesus' appearance was marred in any way. In fact, a key element is that Jesus did look just like a man, not a form "beyond that of human semblance". Nor did He appear to any Kings (who could have been startled at His ...


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This is from Barnes' Notes and aspires to do just that: http://biblehub.com/commentaries/barnes/isaiah/52.htm


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Why oh why do we continue to share ignorance and ignore the scholarship of those teachers who have gone before us? Is it remarkable to suppose that someone in the 6,000 year history of mankind had the same question? That maybe some commentators who are experts in actual hermeneutics and Hebrew and Greek have already authoritatively answered this question? ...


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In the original Hebrew there is no definite article before the word "destroyer" or "craftsman." The Hebrew is בָּרָ֥אתִי מַשְׁחִ֖ית לְחַבֵּֽל not בָּרָ֥אתִי הַמַשְׁחִ֖ית לְחַבֵּֽל. This would indicate that it isn't referring to a specific known Destroyer, but destroyers generally. So to the reference to a smith (or craftsman) means smiths generally, not a ...


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The phrase “because no” (על לא) does not appear to have any particular vowel pointing nuance or exceptions of spelling in Hebrew Scripture, however the Masoretic scholars noted that the phrase “because no” occurs three times in the Masoretic Text. (Please see the middle column on Masoretic note on Page 486 of the Codex Leningradis online.) Notwithstanding ...


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The Hebrew phrase לֹא חָמָס עָשָׂה (loʾ chāmās ʿāsāh) could possibly suggest that the individual did not commit a crime (i.e., act of violence) that warranted being imprisoned and sentenced to death (e.g., committing murder),1 without necessarily suggesting that he was a righteous or innocent man. However, the prophet Isaiah also describes this individual as ...



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