Tag Info

New answers tagged

3

Context virtually demands the future Obviously if Isa 7:14 is taken primarily as a prophetic statement referring to Jesus Christ's birth (so Mt 1:23, being a prophetic message to "the house of David," v.13, not Ahaz himself, who did not want a sign, v.12), it would be future.1 However, even if taken as referring to the only other possible referent in the ...


3

The translation of almah as virgin makes no sense in context. First, the word almah is a vague term that means a young woman. Betulah is a more specific term for a virgin, especially one whose signs of virginity are still in tact. See Bably. Talmud Yevamot 60b ("והא אמר רבי שמעון 'בתולה' בתולה שלימה משמע" -"and Rabbi Shimon says that the word "betulah" ...


4

A note about the flavor of the two major extant text traditions: The LXX was very Messianic in interpretation, in keeping with Jewish tendencies at the time. In contrast, after the events of the first century, Judaism became very anti-Christian to the point of altering interpretations (and even the text at times) where Christians had claimed Scriptural ...


4

Dinah is called a parthenos in Genesis 34:3 after being raped in Genesis 34:2. Not sure what the LXX translators were thinking there either. They could have easily used the feminine adjective for "young" as a substantive, as in Titus 2:4 where "young wives/women" is translated from tas neas. Other possible Greek words are korasion and "korē" (e.g. "The ...


5

Isaiah 7:11 makes it clear that this boy's birth will be a sign to King Ahaz. The boy would be named Immanuel, meaning "God with us," so Ahaz would know God had not abandoned his people, and would deliver them from the armies that were poised to attack. According to verse 14, the boy's mother was already pregnant when Isaiah and Ahaz had this conversation, ...



Top 50 recent answers are included