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The phrase “because no” (על לא) does not appear to have any particular vowel pointing nuance or exceptions of spelling in Hebrew Scripture, however the Masoretic scholars noted that the phrase “because no” occurs three times in the Masoretic Text. (Please see the middle column on Masoretic note on Page 486 of the Codex Leningradis online.) Notwithstanding ...


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The Hebrew phrase לֹא חָמָס עָשָׂה (loʾ chāmās ʿāsāh) could possibly suggest that the individual did not commit a crime (i.e., act of violence) that warranted being imprisoned and sentenced to death (e.g., committing murder),1 without necessarily suggesting that he was a righteous or innocent man. However, the prophet Isaiah also describes this individual as ...


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St Justin's Dialogue with Trypho was written about 100 years after our Lord's Resurrection and he clearly states and gives examples of the Jews altering the Old Testament and repeatedly asserts that this has happened to Isaiah 7:14. Codex Vaticanus and Codex Siniaticus are dated about 400 a.d. and both use the greek for Virgin. The Jews stopped using the ...


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Whether or not the two passages are directly referring to one another or not is unknown, but their style is almost identical. The pattern here is to first see, and then hear, then understand (or not) and then be healed (or destroyed). The verses 8-10 need not necessarily be a direct parallel of Deuteronomy, since they're already a direct parallel of Isaiah'...


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As you stated yourself the twice written part was used to emphasise the words. It would be quite clear that the father of the prodigal son did not simply say "my son, my son" two times, but rather yelled it so loudly that when written down it was written two times to emphasise how loud it was said. There are plenty of examples such as this from the bible ...



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