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10

The verses say this: Genesis 31: 30 Now you have indeed gone away because you longed greatly for your father’s house; but why did you steal my gods?” 31 Then Jacob replied to Laban, “Because I was afraid, for I thought that you would take your daughters from me by force. 32 The one with whom you find your gods shall not live; in the presence of ...


9

My translation from the beginning of 13: 1When Ephraim speaks they tremble, For he's a prince in Israel, [reading nasi instead of nasa] But he's guilty of Baal worship, he's dead. 2And now they continue to sin, they made an image from silver, to fit their own idolatrous ideas, the whole thing is a work of craftsmen, of them it is said, ...


8

Idols were commonplace in David's time, perhaps his wife Michal went out and purchased one to help cover up his escape. Another possibility is that other residents in his household worshiped the idols and David never expressly forbade idols from his household, thus Michal may have borrowed or moved an idol from elsewhere in the house.


4

2. And now, they continue to sin, and they have made for themselves a molten image from their silver according to their pattern, deities, all of it the work of craftsmen; to them say, "Those who sacrifice man may kiss the calves." And now: Jehu’s dynasty, who saw all this, continue to sin. according to their pattern: Heb. ...


4

This is a good question. The information available is very complex, so I have gleaned the most relevent information to answer the question. To begin, @lasersauce made the correct observation that He [Tammuz] appears to have been a god of the spring, and the myth regarding him told of his early death and of the descent of Istar, his bride, into the ...


4

According to J. R. Dummelow, Tammuz was a deity worshipped both in Babylonia and in Phoenicia—the same as the Greek Adonis. He appears to have been a god of the spring, and the myth regarding him told of his early death and of the descent of Istar his bride into the underworld in search of him. The death of Tammuz symbolised the destruction of the ...


4

As far as the grammar goes, the phrase "which is idolatry" is linked only to covetousness. Of particular note is that πλεονεξίαν (covetousness) is introduced with a definite article, which Melick (NAC citing BDF, 258, 1), for instance, notes, "is found in situations where modifying clauses further define the noun." It is often noted that this echoes the ...


3

It is highly unlikely Hosea is using a literary device. First, there were two real golden calves in Israel the people worshipped. When the nation divided, Jeroboam, the first king of Israel made two golden calves: Therefore the king asked advice, made two calves of gold, and said to the people, “It is too much for you to go up to Jerusalem. Here are ...


3

The Cosmic Temple Among others, both John Walton (Genesis 1 as Ancient Cosmology) and G.K. Beale (The Temple and the Church's Mission) argue that the cosmos and Eden are constructed in Genesis 1-2 in terminology fitting of a temple. Beale in an article titled, "Eden, The Temple, And The Church's Mission In The New Creation", elaborates at least nine points ...


3

There were many situations where a first century Christian or Jew may have encountered meat sacrificed to idols. Meat was offered to idols before being served in temples’ dining halls (often as part of worship) or being used for communal meals; some of the meat served at the marketplace had been offered to idols. One who ate in a temple would know ...


2

Oft times in my studies, I find it beneficial to realize the truth that the nature of mankind has been relatively constant through the ages, especially when it comes to security, financial and otherwise. Perhaps a key motive for Rachel's theft was more mercenary than spiritual. Take note of the following First Testament passages, noting especially the ...


2

The Jewish Virtual Library says in reference to the Nuzi tablets: Rachel's theft of her father Laban's household gods (Genesis 31:19) may be explained by the idea that possession of household gods could be part of a legal title to the paternal estate. And in the case of a married daughter, it gave her husband the claim to her father's property (C.H. ...


2

Except for the comment of Novatian (d. 258), comments I've seen on 1 Cor. 12:3 by the Ante-Nicean Fathers appear off-topic. Novatian might have been the only such proto-Orthodox writer to have addressed this seeming curse, alluding that: Established in this Spirit [of God], "none ever calleth Jesus anathema" (A Treatise of Novatian Concerning the Trinity ...


2

There is a parallel to between the passage in question and Galatians 4:8, which talks about the unbeliever who is impelled to idolatry. Galatians 4:8 (NASB) 8 However at that time, when you did not know God, you were slaves to those which by nature are no gods. The parallel is that the unbeliever is "led astray" toward idolatry (1 Cor 12:2), and the ...


2

The Idea in Brief Unlike modern English, in Koine Greek the general relative pronoun (ὅστις, ἥτις, ὅ τι) may be attracted in case and number not to its antecedent, but to its predicate nominative. That is, in the passage of Col 3:5, the relative pronoun ἥτις ("which") is feminine singular not because πλεονεξία ("greed") is feminine singular, but because the ...


2

Teraphim: more than mere ‘idols’ The most that can be said with certainty is that teraphim were cultic objects, distinguished in Hebrew vocabulary from carved and molded idols, of significant value and meaning in Israelite religion and lore. They were probably made in human form to represent a household god or deceased ancestors. Like the more familiar ...


1

Based on opinions from several early Torah commentators, it appears that the issue with the earrings had less to do with their use as jewelry, and more to do with their possibly having been used in conjunction with idolatry. Observe that the patriarchal figures themselves wore rings in their body. For example, in Genesis 24:30 Abraham's servant observes ...


1

In 1 Kings 16:9, it is written, ט וַיִּקְשֹׁ֤ר עָלָיו֙ עַבְדֹּ֣ו זִמְרִ֔י שַׂ֖ר מַחֲצִ֣ית הָרָ֑כֶב וְה֤וּא בְתִרְצָה֙ שֹׁתֶ֣ה שִׁכֹּ֔ור בֵּ֣ית אַרְצָ֔א אֲשֶׁ֥ר עַל־הַבַּ֖יִת בְּתִרְצָֽה׃ (WLC) which is translated as, 9 And his servant Zimri, captain of half the chariots, conspired against him, and he was in Tirtzah drinking [himself] drunk [in] the ...


1

Executive Summary The Greek New Testament in addition to most English translations of the passage treat verses 18-21 as one unit, or one paragraph. John is admonishing his followers in this paragraph to protect themselves from the slavery of sin (idolatry), which otherwise exposes one to direct demonic influence. Discussion In the Hebrew Bible idols were ...


1

I see what you are getting at and think Paul is using extremes to show that falling under the leading and influence of the Holy Spirit is not a morally neutral experience separate from true doctrine. In other words if a person is claiming to encounter the Spirit, yet they deny Christ, such a person is not experiencing the Spirit. On the other hand if a ...


1

By making these seemingly simple statements a matter of speaking by the holy spirit or not, the Apostle is telling the Corinthian ekklesia that their emphasis on intellectuality misses the more important thing: to be filled by the Spirit of God. The joy of the Spirit is not the tickling of ears. It is the respect for what is holy and true that leads to a ...


1

Paul is making a subtle reference to the Ten Commandments. He refers to the command to make no idols, and then the command against taking the Lord's name in vain. Thus, it is "word-and-response." The spoken Word comes from God (idols are dumb) and His people "take His name" upon them through the Covenant oath, a legal, public profession. "Amen" seals the ...


1

From my point of view, these household gods really stands for the smaller gods and the worship of idols, but yet the Almighty God was with these family because of Jacob. Jacob did not know about these gods, but worshiped the God of his grandfather Abraham, and his father Isaac. Remember, God told Abraham to leave his people to a land that he will give ...



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