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They fly across the expanse of the heavens. The word פָּנִים pānîm (lit. "faces") is used in "frozen union" with certain prepositions to form constructions that function syntactically as prepositions, linking a verbal idea to a noun.1 That is, they allow a noun to specify something about the nature of the verb. This is no different from other prepositional ...


5

This answer is intended as a follow-up to fdb’s answer, with which I basically agree. OP: Is it a Greek-ism? Yes. Atticism might be another appropriate word. As mentioned, the phrase of interest is ἄνδρες ἀδελφοί (andres adelphoi; men, brothers). This appears to be modeled on the typical Athenian oratorical introductory formula, andres Athenaioi ("...


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The reason that the translations are all over the map is: Some Hebrew manuscripts connect the first word of the following verse with the last word of Psalm 42:5, yielding the phrase "My ever-present help, my God" The meaning of the Hebrew of Psalm 42:11 is uncertain. The above is pointed out in the apparatus of the JPS Tanakh in the Oxford Jewish Study ...


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The NET translates this passage thusly But Moses replied to the Lord, “If the Israelites did not listen to me, then how will Pharaoh listen to me, since I speak with difficulty?” Their justification for this is helpful and can be found in the notes provided along with the translation The “lips” represent his speech (metonymy of cause). The term “...


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ἀδελφός in the singular means “brother”, but the plural ἀδελφοί is used also for “brother(s) and sister(s)”. This usage is classical, for example in Euripides and Herodotus. By contrast, ἀνήρ, plural ἄνδρες means “man, male, husband”. The inclusive term for “men and women” is ἄνθρωποι. So when the Apostle addresses his audience as “ἄνδρες, ἀδελφοί” the ...



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