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From the IVP Bible Background Commentary: Old Testament: 8:17. "branch to the nose." There is an Akkadian expression (laban appi) that refers to a gesture of humility used to come contritely before deity with a petition. When this act is portrayed in art, the worshiper has his hand positioned in front of his nose and mouth, and is sometimes shown with a ...


10

It's odd to me that this isn't literal. The early portion of Genesis (1-11) is usually very literal. In my studies, Numbers is more literal than Gen 1-11 (so literal that I called it "Greek vocabulary on top of Hebrew syntax"). Uses in the Greek The Greek word appears in the NT three times, all in Hebrews. (All scripture references are from the ...


9

It appears to refer to a hug in which the hugger buries his face in the neck of the huggee. Another use of this is in Gen 33:4: וַיָּרָץ עֵשָׂו לִקְרָאתוֹ וַיְחַבְּקֵהוּ, וַיִּפֹּל עַל-צַוָּארָו וַיִּשָּׁקֵהוּ; וַיִּבְכּוּ. And Esau ran to meet him, and embraced him, and fell on his neck, and kissed him; and they wept. A rabbinic midrash from ...


8

"Brothers" in Greek The Greek word for "brothers" here is adelphoi (Strongs G80). This means literally "brothers". However, it can also mean "countryman" or "followers". The NET Bible (which uses the most current translation, taking advantage of the latest in linguistic scholarship) translates this as "brothers and sisters". The footnote for this says ...


7

This one line "Where there is a dead body, there the vultures will gather." is an idiom. This would be the equivalent of saying, "Where there's smoke, there's fire." Long answer: Luke 17:31-37 31 On that day no one who is on the housetop, with possessions inside, should go down to get them. Likewise, no one in the field should go back for ...


7

I guess I prefer the "on earth" reading because the "life without God" reading requires a bit more pressing. I also wonder if the sun plays such an important role in Ecclesiastes because they may represent a common set of wisdom that was not specific to just Qoheleth. There are apparently some interesting parallels between Eccl. and Egyptian literature and ...


6

The complete list from the OT: Gen 33:4 Gen 45:14 Gen 46:29 The expression is not found in Hebrew outside the OT (and indeed only in Gen.) and is not used in modern Hebrew except when intent is mock Biblical.


5

As I've looked into it further, I think we have something along the lines of connotation verses denotation. The denotative meaning of the phrase "under the sun" in Ecclesiastes is "on earth," and this is neutral in meaning. Something being "under the sun" just means it is on the earth. Indeed, "within the realm of God's dominion" would fit there. ...


3

In exegesis: Matthew writes to a Jewish mindset and answers unwritten questions in regard to the widely anticipated coming kingdom of God. Many Jews understood Daniel 2, 7 and 9 correctly in view of the timing of God's plan to restore the Davidic kingdom in the Messiah. The angel Gabriel tells Mary this in Luke 1:30-33 "He will receive the throne of His ...


2

This is only a small addition to previous answers, which have dealt well with the main issue. Act 20:37 And they all wept sore, and fell on Paul's neck, and kissed him The idiom is not restricted to Hebrew: Here a Gentile author is writing about a group of predominantly Gentiles saying goodbye to the apostle to the Gentiles. It is possible that Luke ...


2

The surrounding context makes clear that the reference to taking up a cross is to be understood as a reference to death. 24Then Jesus told his disciples, “If anyone would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow me. 25For whoever would save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for my sake will find it.[1] This ...


2

Perhaps commenter Jas3.1, above, is on the right track. The gospel writers do not say it, but Jesus' "cross talk" was but one instance of perhaps many "difficult sayings" which they and the other disciples did not truly understand until Jesus had died, rose again, and been glorified (e.g., John 6:60 ff., where Jesus explained this difficult saying to His ...


2

As already noted, the LXX is the best place to start, since the Greek word ὀρθοτομέω only occurs once in the Greek New Testament (hapax legomenon). The below verses compare the Greek LXX with the Hebrew MT, which will point us to the Hebrew words. In turn, we will look at the Hebrew words. Proverbs 3:6 (MT) בְּכָל־דְּרָכֶיךָ דָעֵהוּ וְהוּא יְיַשֵּׁר ...


2

My dad told me that according to the (partial) preterists (those who emphasize that the first or primary fulfillment of many of the New Testament prophecies occurred in or before the destruction of Jerusalem, A.D. 70.), eagle is a reference to the Romans, who had the eagle as their banner. If you compare the parallel passage in Matthew 24:28, you will see ...


2

From The Message: Matthew 24:23-28: The Arrival of the Son of Man 23-25"If anyone tries to flag you down, calling out, 'Here's the Messiah!' or points, 'There he is!' don't fall for it. Fake Messiahs and lying preachers are going to pop up everywhere. Their impressive credentials and dazzling performances will pull the wool over the eyes of even ...


2

Putting a branch to God's nose would likely be related to the kindling of God's nostrils. This expression is only used against a whole people when the crime is idolatry, with the exception of the crime of oppressing widows. James Jordan comments on this: “This is jealousy language. Potiphar’s nostrils were kindled when he suspected Joseph of attempting ...


2

Under the sun—how beautiful is the poetry of the Old Testament! The swasheck and Frank Luke's answers, as well as the question itself, all contain some helpful thoughts. However, I think they have still failed to capture the full sense of the phrase. I would argue that its meaning is somewhere between in the physical world and life without God: more ...


1

Rashi says: Your deed. In the midst of the years: 'Your original deed, that You would wreak vengeance for us upon our enemies in the midst of the years of trouble in which we are found.' revive it: 'Awaken it and restore it.' in the midst of the years: 'And in the midst of these years let it be known.' I can't imagine there to be a hidden ...


1

I heartily disagree with your conclusions on this passage of scripture. The former person's comment that Jesus did not consider those that are 'sick, poor or in prison', etc., as being the least of these is completely logical in light of the "beatitudes". This passage of scripture clearly speaks of Jesus separating the nations on His right and his left. He ...


1

Synonyms permit remez linking. "Little" and "least" couple these verses: Mt 18:6 But whoso shall offend one of these little ones which believe in me, it were better for him that a millstone were hanged about his neck, and [that] he were drowned in the depth of the sea. Mt 25:40 And the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto ...



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