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13

No, John 14:16 cannot be used to "cancel" the Trinity and posit a Quaternity (or whatever), and specifically not "Spirits" of past and present. In the understanding of later Christian tradition, the Christian Bible depicts God as outside time in any case: see, e.g. Psalm 90:2 or 1 Timothy 1:17. That is why the "past" and "present" Spirits are nonsensical. ...


12

Short Answer: There is strong evidence from Scripture that they actually received the Spirit at Pentecost, and that what we see in John 20:22 was Jesus giving them a visual illustration and command in preparation for that event. The Controversy For reference, here is the statement in question: He breathed on them and said to them, “Receive the Holy ...


9

In ancient times a seal or signet was an instrument, often metal or stone, with an engraved pattern or design on it. It would be pressed into a softer material, usually wax or clay leaving an imprint like a stamp. A seal affixed to a document (usually on a scroll) would have to be broken in order to unroll the document and read it. This meant it was in one ...


8

Genesis reference The W. Hall Harris commentary on the issues says this: The use of the verb ejnefuvshsen to describe the action of Jesus here recalls Gen 2:7 in the LXX, where “the LORD God formed man out of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living being.” This time, however, it is Jesus who is ...


6

Jesus' statement about the unforgivable sin comes in the context of an attack from the Pharisees: 22 The experts in the law who came down from Jerusalem said, “He is possessed by Beelzebul,” and, “By the ruler of demons he casts out demons.” They recognize that Jesus is doing the work of casting out demons, a good work, but instead of accepting this ...


6

This seem like a simple answer but this section is talking about extra ordinary gifts. It is an unusual gift of faith to some believers only, not general faith in Christ. What these gifts were exactly and if they are still given today is a controversy within Christianity. Primarily the split is between charismatics and tradition cessation movements. For ...


5

From one Christian perspective: The Holy Ghost is capable of doing his job without any knowledge you have of hermeneutics. However he does not often do it if you do not have knowledge of his Word. Knowing this first, that no prophecy of the scripture is of any private interpretation. For the prophecy came not in old time by the will of man: but holy ...


4

I think Paul is talking about the future resurrection, but with a very real sense of that future resurrection being something inevitable - giving us certainty, purpose, and hope in the present time. A few verses later we read about having been adopted as sons: 15 For you did not receive the spirit of slavery to fall back into fear, but you have received ...


4

As I explained here, there are two phases to the interpretation of Scripture: 1) Knowing the text This is where you learn the literal interpretation via a study of the language, cultural references, etc. In this phase, you pretty much just need a working brain, good education in history and languages, diligence in your studies, and no weird spiritual ...


4

There are four instances of the Present Imperative (Second Person Plural) in the Epistle to the Ephesians where there is ambiguity between the middle and passive voice, because the literal grammatical verb form is identical. (Please click here for more examples in the New Testament.) In the Epistle to the Ephesians, every single one of these four verbs is in ...


4

The word "forgive*"(aphiemi-to send forth*) implies a legal action: it holds one 'harmless' from a legal debt. To be declared "aphiemi", means one's debt has been satisfied; in the case of Matt. 12:30-32, one's penalty of 'sin and blasphemy' shall be "aphiemi" them-following, of course, the prescription of 1 John 1:9,"If we confess our sins; He is faithful ...


3

I think I understand your question to be more basically asking: Why is there the singular "name" in this verse, and yet it is referring to 3 persons? In Matt. 28:19b "βαπτίζοντες αὐτοὺς εἰς τὸ ὄνομα τοῦ Πατρὸς καὶ τοῦ Υἱοῦ καὶ τοῦ Ἁγίου Πνεύματος", τὸ ὄνομα "the name" is an articular neuter accusative singular noun. It has to be so because the article τὸ ...


3

As far as I have understood, this is a parallell to the Genesis creation narrative, where God gives Adam life by breathing into his nostrils the breath of life (Gen 2,7). I guess this should be read in the light of the promise in e.g. Ezekiel 11,19 and a response to the prayer in Ps. 51,12. I don't think this verse should be seen separate from the next, ...


3

Exegeting the passage τῇ δεξιᾷ οὖν τοῦ Θεοῦ ὑψωθεὶς τήν τε ἐπαγγελίαν τοῦ Πνεύματος τοῦ Ἁγίου λαβὼν παρὰ τοῦ Πατρὸς ἐξέχεεν τοῦτο ὃ ὑμεῖς καὶ βλέπετε καὶ ἀκούετε So then, exalted to the right hand of God, and having received the promise of the Holy Spirit from the Father, he has poured out what you both see and hear. (Acts 2:33 NET) Beginning with ...


2

Hermeneutics can certainly provide context toward understanding a particular passage, but only in an objective way. Some of the context required for understanding the truth is not accessible without obedience, a transformation of the subject (the disciple).


2

"And Jesus ... was led by the Spirit in the wilderness for forty days, being tempted by the devil." There is no indication in the Greek text of Luke 4:1-14 that the Spirit left Jesus to fend for himself, even briefly, when he was πειραζόμενος ὑπὸ τοῦ διαβόλου ("tempted of the devil" in KJV). Ergo, the same motivation that moved him to go INTO the ...


2

Answer to a part of your question. It could well be that John had access to what is now known as the Community Rule of the Dead Sea Scrolls as it was old enough, dating from the 2nd century BCE. In the third part it says: "He shall be cleansed from all his sins by the spirit of holiness uniting him to His truth . . . And when his flesh is sprinkled with ...


2

While this topic is usually called the "Unforgivable Sin" I believe that is a bad translation and it should really be called the "Unignorable Sin". Verse 32 is: Anyone who speaks a word against the Son of Man will be forgiven, but anyone who speaks against the Holy Spirit will not be forgiven, either in this age or in the age to come. (NIV) The Greek ...


2

Jad, I think I am one of those who appeal to John 20 but not primarily for Pentecostal leanings, but rather to show that the disciples were already saved believers before the Day of Pentecost. A link between Matt. 18 & John 20 may exist, but only to the extent that Jesus was reiterating a principle established on at least two other occasions, namely ...


2

I'd like to add something to @curiousdanni answer (and his comments) but from Aramaic perspective. In Aramaic Peshitta the word forgiven in Matthew 12:30-32 is ܢܶܫܬ݁ܒ݂ܶܩ which can also have meanings of left, ignored, omitted, dismissed (see William Jennings' Lexicon to the Syriac New Testament) and it is used in other verses in such meaning. For example: ...


2

The Hebrew Words for the Spirit Coming on People In both Testaments, the Holy Spirit comes upon people to empower them for acts they could not do themselves or at the very least could not do as well themselves as when empowered. While many of the references are to God's Spirit empowering to prophesy (and most people seem to default to this example), the ...


2

Tertullian, in Against Marcion, Book 2, Ch. 10 writes, This description, it is manifest, properly belongs to the transgression of the angel, and not to the prince's: for none among human beings was either born in the paradise of God, not even Adam himself, who was rather translated there; nor placed with a cherub upon God's holy mountain, that ...


2

There are (at least) four issues that must be dealt with in order to sufficiently answer this question, and much ink has been spilled on all of these issues. Issue 1: Context (and identification) of the scripture being cited If the author of James is citing another text, then understanding the original context of the quoted passage may shed some light on ...


1

1) Since the verb "πληρόω" is transitive, there won't be any wordform distinction between present middle and passive, and only the context can guide you. So of course there are two interpretations: the passive is favored by those who believe God fills people with (the) Spirit and the middle is favored by those who believe people fill themselves with spirit. ...


1

With two exceptions, the Greek words seen in Acts 2:4-11; 1 Cor. 14:2-20, and translated into English as "tongue" or "tongues," are forms of the Greek verb ΓΛΩΣΣΑ (γλῶσσα, glossa). The implication is that glossa refers to a regional dialect or language spoken by someone has not naturally learned it. Glossa does not refer to the ecstatic (enraptured) praise ...


1

Are their two different types of “tongues” spoke about in the NT? I believe it would be a misnomer to say that there are two different “types” of tongues. However, there are two separate and distinct “operations” of tongues. The Operation of Tongues The gift of speaking in tongues is seen to operate in two distinct ways: personal and corporate. Though ...



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