New answers tagged

-1

This verse is actually prophetic, that is, it has an original significance and a future significance. It could be called a parable. See Matthew chapter 13 on Jesus teaching and explaining parables. Much of the stories and events of the Old Testament have a futuristic overture and are repeated. The making of man in the image of God was not the physical ...


0

2 Kings 13:14-19 reintroduce King Joash after his own death, so at this stage the narrative is thematic rather than chronological. Rachelle Gilmour (Juxtaposition and the Elisha Cycle, pages 199-201) cites DeVries, who believes that 2 Kings 13:14-19 to be a later addition to this narrative. Gilmour says this episode was probably juxtaposed with 2 Kings 8:7-...


3

The ancient Egyptian equivalent of the Hebrew תּוֹעֵבָה (tôʿēbâ) is bawut: Although bwt is sometimes still translated ‘abomination’, the consensus of contemporary Egyptologists suggests a meaning more at ‘taboo’. Specified foods (e.g. pork, fish, honey), behaviors (e.g. sexual activity, walking ‘upside-down’) and people (e.g. menstruating women, ...


1

These appear to be Jewish assumptions, rather than historical details about Egyptian culture. The Targum Onkelos says in explanation of Genesis 43:32: Ch 41-44: And Joseph made haste, for his compassions were moved upon his brother, and he sought to weep, and he went into the chamber [JERUSALEM. Into the chamber] the house of sleep, and wept there. And ...


0

I did not get much information regarding the historical interpretations that I was seeking, so I chose to do some research myself. Itemization of Historical Interpretations NOTE: I have not discovered anything that directly warrants a support for my conjectures about "Canaanitish woman" being a reference to acting like a prostitute.1 What I have found is ...



Top 50 recent answers are included