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The Greek name Abel (Ἅβελ) is one of the indeclinable proper names in the NT. So it can have a nominative, genitive, dative, or accusative idea with the same form. Other NT mentions of Abel in context of his blood have it in a genitive relationship, but clearly as part of a construction using the genitive article and in one case a genitive apposition: Mat ...


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Twice elsewhere the author of the epistle to the Hebrews uses a genitive without preceding the construct noun (in this case, the proper name) by a definite article: Heb. 9:4: ἡ ῥάβδος Ἀαρὼν ("the rod of Aaron") Heb. 11:30: τὰ τείχη Ἰεριχὼ ("the walls of Jericho") Likewise, in Heb. 12:24, τὸν Ἅβελ could stand for τὸν αἷμα Ἅβελ, where Ἅβελ is an ...


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I would say that the word here to entreat means to entice to call the person out of their situation and to become steadfast with the one calling them to come out of their situation. Which would put it inline with Jesus' atoning works on the cross as well as in being obedient to God's Commandment for His people to come out from amongst them and to keep thy ...


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Some have claimed the plural pronouns of Genesis 1.26 refer to the trinity. But this is not an proper exegesis of the Hebrew text. The plural pronoun "us" and "our" are simply required from the Hebrew noun elohim which is plural. It is simply Hebrew grammar and cannot be used to prove the doctrine of the Trinity. Read When Critics Ask by Norman Geisler and ...


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History The Hebrew and Greek terms for 'messenger' do have this natural overlap, and can cause contention in translation. The Latin Vulgate was the first translation which tried to separate the word into divine and human, by transliterating the Greek term αγγελος to create the Latin angelus for divine messengers, and 'translating' it properly for human ...


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If Jesus wanted everyone to know what he was talking about, he would have spoken plainly. He spoke in parables to separate those who were spiritual minded from those who were more literal minded. He also spoke in parables so he could speak about sensitive issues in a way that would allow him to speak openly without getting shut down (though they still tried ...


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GRK: δυσφημούμενοι παρακαλοῦμεν ὡς περικαθάρματα NAS: when we are slandered, we try to conciliate; we have become KJV: Being defamed, we intreat: we are made INT: slandered we entreat as [the] refuse Although the Greek word is used elsewhere in this form, traditionally meaning to exhort or urge, conciliation seems to make th most sense here. After a ...



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