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8

Identification of genre is both simple and profoundly difficult.1 "Genre", by way of definition, is the technical name given to a "literary category". (Note that "genre can be used of other creative productions, but we're interested in texts in BH.SE.) This answer has three main sections: first, on locating a given text within some genre second, on ...


6

This will be a partial answer, intended primarily as a supplement to this answer, since she mentioned that she is an expert in Jewish approaches but not in Christian approaches. (I can't add anything to her answer on Jewish approaches, so I won't bother trying to cover that material!) There are a variety of Christian approaches to the TaNaKh (i.e. the ...


6

Is it possible to "bracket" your bias during interpretation, enabling you to essentially approach the text in an "unbiased" manner, despite the bias that is technically present? It is possible to "bracket" a subset of your bias but not all of it. As an analogy, if you do not like the look of a certain food you can agree to take a blind taste test to ...


5

Warning. Giant wall of text from my master's thesis upcoming. tl;dr; It is likely that the discount applied by the steward had no impact on his employer because of the practice of adding excessive commission to sales. The discount can be seen as the steward discounting his own commission in order to gain favor with the debtors. The Parable of The Steward ...


5

Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch dedicated many essays to this subject. They may be found in English translation in his Collected Writings, Volume III; ISBN:0-87306-786-X. The primary tools Rabbi Hirsch uses in his analysis are the following ground rules, which he develops in the introductory chapter (slightly abridged for convenience): The symbolic ...


5

Here are a few things that might help point the interpreter in the right direction. (NOTE: This answer is from a Christian perspective) The referential nature of language Language is referential. If I say "I own a house," any English-speaker will recognize that I am referring to a place of residence. However, if I said "I own a lamaroutous" that would be ...


5

PROGRESSIVE RECAPITULATORY PARALLELISM "Parallelism" refers to the identification of seven parallel sections of Revelation: -ch1-3 -ch4-7 -ch8-11 -ch12-14 -ch15-16 -ch17-19 -ch20-22 "Recapitulatory" refers to how each of these sections is seen as being somewhat overlapping, with one section recapitulating what another has said, but in a different way. ...


5

Is it possible to be unbiased? No; everybody has biases about all sorts of things. Is it possible to bracket one's biases for the sake of open inquiry? Yes, it is. In fact, some say that bracketing is essential to study talmud (which is based in text). More broadly, there are scientific and unscientific ways of enquiring into the meaning of biblical ...


4

Good question. There are many fascinating aspects of Paul's hermeneutic that come to the fore here, and we need to do some digging to recognize the source of the connections which he makes. How is Hagar connected to Sinai? First, the connection is there simply in terms of Paul's own controlling metaphor. Throughout Gal 3:22 and onward, Paul has been ...


4

Genesis 4 brings us a very simple narrative of Abel bringing an offering. The text doesn't even tell us directly that the offering was sacrificed, although it is generally considered a true assumption that it was. Genesis 4:3-4a (ESV) 3  In the course of time Cain brought to the Lord an offering of the fruit of the ground, 4  and Abel also ...


4

I would say yes. Earlier in verses 11-14, John records this exchange: “Sir,” the woman said, “you have nothing to draw with and the well is deep. Where can you get this living water? Are you greater than our father Jacob, who gave us the well and drank from it himself, as did also his sons and his livestock?” Jesus answered, “Everyone who drinks ...


4

A Dispensationalist Perspective This question seriously needs input from a dispensationalist point of view, so I thought to oblige. The huge ignorance of dispensationalism displayed by Mike Bull's answer at the least requires a response. An Agreement First, let me state that I (generally) agree with what has been posted thus far that: Theology affects ...


4

What is 'hermeneutics'? Hermeneutics is the field of study concerned with the philosophy and science of interpretation -- especially the interpretation of communication. "Biblical hermeneutics" is specifically concerned with the philosophy and science of interpreting the Biblical text. So Biblical hermeneutics would cover all of the following sorts of ...


4

That's an interesting question. Jabez isn't mentioned anywhere else, he just appears, prays, and disappears again. I think that given the tone of this interjection, the chronicler's point was theological in nature. This fits with the overall theme of 1-2 Chronicles, which was written after the Jew's return from exile to remind them of God's covenant ...


4

Your distinction between "meaning" and "application" seems more to be a distinction between "translation" and "meaning" - two scholars agree about the translation of a text, but disagree on what it means. They may agree that a certain English word best corresponds with a certain Hebrew word, but they may still disagree on the nuances of the term in its ...


4

A parable, I have been taught since childhood, is a "heavenly story with an earthly meaning," which is good as far as it goes. The word parable, however, carries with it the idea of placing alongside. What is placed alongside what? you may ask. The answer is: Our lives are placed alongside the story, and the point of the story is meant to stir ...


4

Hanegraaff's eschatological approach is described in great detail in his book The Apocalypse Code (not to be confused with Apocalypse Code by Hal Lindsey). It is also very clear that his hermeneutic is not even remotely original to him. He hits almost all of the same notes that have been used by preterists for the last few decades, including: Argument for ...


4

This is an excellent question and you are right to tag it philosophy. If I may rephrase it slightly: Is Hermeneutics a branch of Epistemology or Ontology? Hermeneutics is the theory (and art) of understanding a text. Epistemology is the philosophical examination of how people obtain knowledge. So if hermeneutics is merely an epistemological endeavour, ...


4

I may not fully understand your question, and it's difficult to parse what you're seeking, but the evidence would indicate that this story was actually a "stock trope" that Jesus leveraged to teach his audience about how to value people above possessions. In the below answer I attempt to address (Luke's) "authorial intent" in the way that he organized the ...


3

Before I venture a guess to your question (which sounds to me like a trick question!), I suggest you change the word "stone" to "substance," since I don't think gold qualifies as a stone; it's a precious metal. Now if the gold is ensconced within a stone or there is an obvious vein of gold throughout the stone, then no change would be needed. That being ...


3

One Dispensationalist's Perspective You ask a number of subsidiary questions in your comments to Mike's answer. I will likely attempt to answer some of those in this answer as well, since some relate. Also, in general, this will not agree with Mike's perspective on why dispensationalists interpret as they do. Finally, my dispensational articulation here ...


3

There are definitely limits as to how the approach should be used, and it is not an exegetical approach. Instead it is an approach which says that it is important that we see an overarching metanarrative through the whole Bible and that its focus is on Jesus. Graeme Goldsworthy says: The immediate appeal of biblical theology to preachers, teachers and ...


3

Here are a few proposals. I'll update this post as I learn more, or delete it if a better answer is posted that addresses these points. 1. Chiasmus is a way of structuring a literary unit... if it is not a literary unit, then it is not a chiasm. Given the purpose of chiasmus -- to organize a literary unit, to make the literary unit more memorable, and ...


3

Years ago I read with interest Berger and Luckmann's classic The Social Construction of Reality. As near as I could tell, Berger was a sociologist who may have been (and still is?) a Christian. He taught at a variety of schools, including Evangelische Akademie in Germany, the University of North Carolina, Hartford Theological Seminary, the New School for ...


3

**1bi·as noun \ˈbī-əs\ : a tendency to believe that some people, ideas, etc., are better than others that usually results in treating some people unfairly** (Merriam Webster Dictionary). Yes, it is possible to lay aside bias when approaching Scripture to interpret it. It is essential to humble oneself before Scriptural and the Spirit of ...


2

At the seminary I graduated from, we were taught the rules in Dr. Hernanado's Hermeneutics class as part of the history of interpretation. In Dr. Nunnally's Jewish backgrounds to the NT class, we were drilled in them again. They both showed us places in the New Testament where the writers used the rules in their own interpretation. However, we were not ...


2

I will present the "no" perspective. Short Answer: John expected his readers to see the water jar as an actual, literal, physical water jar. With that said, John had a reason for mentioning the water jar, and it was probably to show the woman's sudden change in priorities. Symbols in Scripture It is true that throughout Scripture there are times when an ...


2

If an author intends to communicate through symbols he must either rely upon a community's preexisting symbolic language or make an effort to define the meaning of the image within the text itself. Ruben Zimmermann in his book Imagery in the Gospel of John thus offers two criteria for weighing a symbols plausibility: (1) conventional plausibility and (2) ...


2

As is the nature of historical fields, such as the anthropological and linguistic fields which serve as our surest means of understanding such colloquial forms of language, at least some uncertainty or ambiguity will always haunt our attempts at determining the meaning of symbols, or most any other metaphor for that matter. Rationally speaking, it is a ...



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