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8

Before anything, though, I must say that no, king Joash would not know that he must strike the ground five or six times. But, he really should have did that. All verse emphasis mine. First of all, we would have to look at the reason why Elisha would be angry at an answer to a seemingly minuscule command, 2 Kings 13:14 (NKJV) 14 Elisha had become ...


7

Vanhoozer answers your question somewhat himself in Is There a Meaning in the Text? (at least from his perspective). He states (emphasis added and comments in brackets added by me): It is most important to distinguish literalistic from literal interpretation. The former [literalistic] generates an unlettered, ultimately illiterate reading—one ...


4

Astrology as in the belief that the heavenly bodies control our fate is condemned in the Bible. But there's also astronomy, which is the science used to create calendars. The Sun and the Moon are for times and seasons and a good calendar takes both into account. Months, even today, are based loosely on the lunar cycles. The lunar cycle takes about 29.5 ...


3

A Basic Definition Hermeneutics is both the science and the art of interpreting any written communication, but particularly the Bible. Hermes, the ancient Greek god was considered to be the herald and messenger of the other gods. (The Roman counterpart was Mercury, the wing-ed messenger.) Historically, then, hermeneutics concerns the interpretation of ...


2

Actually, Vernon Robbins introduced socio-rhetorical interpretation into New Testament studies back in 1984, and Ben Witherington's more recent attempts to co-opt the term for what he does are much different. Robbins wrote a basic introduction to socio-rhetorical criticism back in 1996 (Exploring the Texture of Texts), but he has updated the approach in ...


2

The Book of Ecclesiates, known in Tanach as Kohellet and attributed to King Solomon, was controversial even before it was canonized by the rabbis. Many verses troubled them because they contradicted fundamental concepts in the Torah. In the end, the rabbis decided that the every less-than-holy statement in Kohellet was ultimately undone by Kohellets ...


2

There is indubitably a verbal resemblance between the Greek (LXX) version of Joel 3:2: καὶ συνάξω πάντα τὰ ἔθνη “and I shall gather together all the nations” and Mt 25:32: καὶ συναχθήσονται ἔμπροσθεν αὐτοῦ πάντα τὰ ἔθνη “and before him will be gathered together all the nations”. συνάξω and συναχθήσονται are two forms (future active and future passive ...


2

Short Answer: It depends on which hermeneutic you follow. To my knowledge there are three major hermeneutical approaches to this question: Approach #1: The literal hermeneutic In this approach, the text means precisely what it says; Bethel refers to Bethel, Judah to Judah, Ephraim to Ephraim. If we read a prophecy anticipating the downfall of Gilgal it ...


2

It is sometimes hard to discern material from the Elohist source apart from that by the Yahwist source, but in this instance, Norman C. Habel says that the main narrative is usually attributed to the Elohist and that the appendix in verses 22:15-18 appears to belong to the Yahwist (Literary Criticism of the Old Testament, page 56). As the Elohist and the ...


2

Earlier Derivation I have found the phrase "hermeneutics of the letter" in a quote within John Catalano's Francis Lieber: Hermeneutics and Practical Reason (2000) on page 26. On page 24, we find out the quote is an English translation from the German of G. A. Friedrich Ast (1778-1841) in his book Grundlinien der Grammatik, Hermeneutik und Kritik (1808), ...


2

One Way At present I only have time to outline how I particularly would fit this text with my dispensational view about two categories of resurrection separated by time periods. There are actually two possible ways the verse can fit (or even combining both ideas): The "hour" is not necessarily definite, for it lacks the article (ἔρχεται ὥρα), so "an hour ...


1

Christopher D. Stanley says in As it is Written, pages 30-31, the term 'allusion' is used for a figure of speech that makes indirect extra-textual references but has been and remains notoriously difficult to define in specific terms. He cites C. Hugh Holman in A Handbook to Literature, one of the standard handbooks of literary study, as defining allusion ...


1

Whether or not there was a formal Matthean Community, I think it is reasonable to speak of a "Matthean Community" because the Gospel seems to have been unknown to the authors of Luke and John, suggesting a community isolated from broader Christianity. If it can be shown that the author of Luke did know of Matthew's Gospel, as Dennis R. MacDonald has sought ...


1

Wikipedia defines eisegesis as the process of interpreting a text or portion of text in such a way that the process introduces one's own presuppositions, agendas, or biases into and onto the text. This is commonly referred to as reading into the text. Randall Price puts it a little differently in The Secrets of the Dead Sea Scrolls, page 83, where he ...


1

I'll answer this question without discussing variants Johanine prologue. Historically there are four distinctive readings of the prologue, Sabellius who distinguish the three divine persons functionally. Samosata who distinguish the impersonal Logos from the personal Son. Arius who distinguish the unbegotten God from the begotten God. St. Athanasius who ...


1

I propose that before considering location and its meaning, we must consider time. In this respect, Amos is considered to have been written before the fall of Samaria in 722 BCE. When Amos is talking about locations in Israel, he really is talking about the northern kingdom in contemporary or near-contemporary terms. Amos was a prophet of Yahweh and possibly ...


1

John says in his first letter, in verses 7 and 8, "For there are three that testify: the Spirit and the water and the blood; and the three are in agreement." It is obvious that we are saved by the blood of Jesus Christ, in that our sins are fully payed for by the act of His death, and there no longer stands any accusation or record of wrong against us ...


1

NOT WATER BAPTISM THAT SAVES YOU: It becomes immediately apparent, when reading this verse, that the ritual of water baptism, though symbolising a spiritual change that has taken place, is not the principal subject here. Peter informs us that he is NOT referring to "the physical removal of dirt from the flesh" (i.e. water baptism) but a spiritual reality of ...


1

Some good questions to answer before exegeting the passage you've quoted include the following: What is the time frame indicated? Is it now or at some time in the future when this reigning will take place? Who are the "we" in the passage? Is the "reigning" in this passage related to Jesus' announcement of the "Kingdom of God" (or the "Kingdom of ...


1

Thank you Jack and Tau. I will now attempt to qualify my position and will start by acknowledging the definition of the word chronology as a listing of events that occur in order with respect to time. An event may be recorded first followed by the time-period or vice versa. Both methods of recording the chronology is employed in the text. I do not think any ...


1

1. “Light and heavy” (קל וחומר) - "kal vachomer", i.e. a minori ad majus and vice versa. The first of Hillel’s rules was known as the rule of “light and heavy” and was simply an application of the usual argument of “from the lesser to the greater.” (cf. Gen. 44:8; Ex. 6:12; Num. 12:14 – not explicit but see BK 25a; Deut. 31:27; I Sam. 23:3; Jer. 12:5; ...


1

As a hebrew speaker, I can tell you that most people are not capable of understanding biblical hebrew. It sounds different, and the words are different. Yet, a lot of people study bible (the old testament) during school. I also need to say that the modern hebrew letters are quite different than the ancient (there are many types of ancient hebrew). I will use ...


1

I think it is clear that the final redactor(s) thought of Elohim as one, and therefore as the sole-one who created mankind (human beings). The phrase 'Let us make...' is a borrowed-motif from other Ancient Near East cultures, and alludes to the concept of a Divine Council (Assembly) - something that the final redactor(s) believed based on the following ...


1

This is a good question, and one that is often misunderstood as the two categories are often confused. In his book, 'Preaching Christ from the Old testament' Greidanus uses Typology in a narrow sense. He points out that the school of Alexandria did not employ typology, but allegory. In fact the opposing school of Antioch employed typology in direct ...



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