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The Greek name Abel (Ἅβελ) is one of the indeclinable proper names in the NT. So it can have a nominative, genitive, dative, or accusative idea with the same form. Other NT mentions of Abel in context of his blood have it in a genitive relationship, but clearly as part of a construction using the genitive article and in one case a genitive apposition: Mat ...


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Twice elsewhere the author of the epistle to the Hebrews uses a genitive construct wherein he does not precede the proper name by a definite article: Heb. 9:4: ἡ ῥάβδος Ἀαρὼν ("the rod of Aaron") Heb. 11:30: τὰ τείχη Ἰεριχὼ ("the walls of Jericho") Likewise, in Heb. 12:24, τὸν Ἅβελ could stand for τὸν αἷμα Ἅβελ, where Ἅβελ is an indeclinable proper name ...


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You are right in saying both Hebrew and Greek words just mean "messenger". The English word "angel" is transliterated from αγγελος. All passages containing "messenger" make most sense when looking see what the actual "message" is that is being brought by the "messenger". The message is more important that the one who brings it. Related Strongs Numbers ...



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