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23

Professor Bart D. Ehrman's Curriculum Vitae reveals an academic with impeccable credentials. Perhaps the most important line is: Ph.D. Princeton Theological Seminary (magna cum laude), 1985 His doctoral adviser was none other than Bruce Metzger, who wrote the book on textual criticism of the New Testament. Ehrman doesn't simply ride on the coattails ...


22

“If their approach was the same I assume they would come to the same theological conclusions” Texts that aren't dense legalese, e.g. books like the Bible which contain stories, parables, philosophies and statues, are necessarily rich with ambiguity and mystery. There is no way that a book like the Bible could unambiguously inform any ...


15

After a chat discussion, this is my understanding: Hermeneutics is the theories and methods for studying text. Exegesis is the interpretation of text. The difference is in theory verses practice. For example, hermeneutics has techniques available, such as contextual analysis, or lexical-syntatical analysis. Hermeneutics is the theory behind translating ...


14

Midrash is part of the rabbinic tradition and expounds on the torah text. It comes from the word dalet-reish-shin (d'rash), to "seek" or "enquire" (per 501 Hebrew Verbs). There are two types of midrash, aggadah and halachic midrash. Aggadot are stories. Sometimes this type of midrash fills in gaps in the narrative, for example filling in dialogue between ...


13

Hermeneutics the study of the principles and methods of textual analysis and interpretation Exegesis the critical explanation and interpretation of a text In common use you would employ hermeneutics to study the text before expounding on it through exegesis. Wikipedia - Hermeneutics Wikipedia - Exegesis


13

No answer would be complete without this quote from Raymond Brown: The sensus plenior is that that additional, deeper meaning, intended by God but not clearly intended by the human author, which is seen to exist in the words of a biblical text (or group of texts, or even a whole book) when they are studied in the light of further revelation or ...


13

From a vocabulary perspective, reading Biblical Hebrew (BH) from a Modern Israeli Hebrew (MIH) perspective is probably somewhat akin to reading Shakespeare (but see cautions below about meanings). However, there are grammatical constructs and language nuances that make it tricky, leading a Hebrew professor I studied with to characterize reading BH without ...


12

I completely agree with Richard's great answer, but would boil it down to this: Exegesis: interpretation (the process) Hermeneutics: rules of interpretation (the principles which should guide the process)


11

The basic difference is Jesus Christ. That may sound trite or rude, but it needn't be. A Christian hermeneutic that is faithful to itself will base its reading of the Old Testament on the way Jesus and the Apostles used the Old Testament. This hermeneutic was rather shocking even to Jesus' disciples (i.e. Christians) even at that time (and I assume Jewish ...


11

First of all, the historical-grammatical approach requires certain assumptions, definitions and foundations. Some of the other frameworks will probably have very similar foundations. As the original texts were written (primarily) in Hebrew and Greek, some level of meaning can be best derived from studying the text in those languages. As a corollary, many ...


10

From the Wikipedia article linked, the Pesharim approach posits that besides the surface meaning of an inspired text, there is a hidden or secret meaning that can only be exposed by individuals who have the requisite knowledge to uncover that meaning. Often the technique repurposes prophesy to apply not to the historical setting in which it was written, but ...


10

This hermeneutic was developed in the early church, and primarily related to understanding the Hebrew Scriptures. Each passage in Scripture is understood to have four meanings: Literal: What the passage says about past events Allegorical: What the passage can tell us about Christ Moral: What the passage can teach us about how to live Anagogical: What the ...


10

Always remember that to effectively use the Quadriga, you must start with the literal (i.e. grammatical-historical methodology) first. If one cannot apply a literal method then you are automatically forced to use a spiritual (allegorical) methodology. The allegorical method is then further divided into topological and anagogical where a text not only gives a ...


10

It simply means that the scriptures must harmonize. The orthodox Christian view of the Bible is that it is not in error and does not contradict itself. Therefore when trying to examine one passage we must approach it with an eye to what the whole Bible says about that topic. For example, let's take divorce. Jesus said, “Everyone who divorces his wife ...


10

You are correct that according to Judaism God is indisputably one, not several beings in one (nor a member of a pantheon of gods). So what does the use of first-person plural mean? The predominant explanation is that God is addressing other (non-godly) beings, though some say God is speaking with himself (like one does when considering both sides of a ...


10

Hillel's seven were later expanded by Rabbi Yishmael ben Elisha into thirteen, dropping one. I'll be drawing this list from the list on Wikipedia. I'll be drawing some examples from this answer on Mi Yodeya about R. Yishmael's list that in turn quotes from the Artscroll prayer book.1 Kal v'chomer: if a lenient case has a stringency, then surely a ...


9

Hermeneutic Circle Part of the problem that this question has suffered is known as the hermeneutic circle. The idea is that we use the text of the Bible to determine our doctrine. However, in order to interpret the text of the Bible, we have to come from a doctrinal predisposition. When we approach hermeneutics seeking to understand a particular ...


9

If you look at the articles on Wikipedia for Biblical hermeneutics, dispensationalism, and covenant theology you will see that they both are referred to as interpretive frameworks as well as theologies. The hermeneutic circle entails that dispensationalism is both a theological framework and a hermeneutical approach. One's theology will affect the reading ...


9

Close reading in context will uncover it at least some of the time. Instead of reading at face value you have to ask yourself questions like: Would that person, in that time and place, say that sincerely? What actions did the speaker or listeners take in response? For instance, did anybody follow a command? What do we know about the historical norms ...


9

From this Hebrew article from the Haaretz newspaper dated September 5, 2008, titled "The Bible in translation to Modern Hebrew", with subtitle "87 year-old teacher publishes 14 pamphlets with a translation of the Bible [OT] to modern Hebrew raises controversy in the education system", you can see that Biblical Hebrew is not easy for Israeli kids to read. ...


9

I don't think it's as simple as knowing when to take a verse literally or symbolically. I will attempt to propose a hermeneutical approach to the translation of the book of Revelation. I am going to approach the text from a Christian perspective (as this was the intended audience). I would not call these 'rules,' but rather 'principles' of interpretation ...


9

Identification of genre is both simple and profoundly difficult.1 "Genre", by way of definition, is the technical name given to a "literary category". (Note that "genre can be used of other creative productions, but we're interested in texts in BH.SE.) This answer has three main sections: first, on locating a given text within some genre second, on ...


8

Ultimately, it would all be purposeless if we weren't trying to find God's meaning in the text. We have to study the various contexts and viewpoints of the author, since God used that particular author for a reason, but in the end we're trying to find out how God thinks.


8

[Conversation] is a process of two people understanding each other. Thus it is a characteristic of every true conversation that each opens himself to the other person, truly accepts his point of view as worthy of consideration and gets inside the other to such an extent that he understands not a particular individual, but what he says. The thing that has ...


8

Most of the answers so far are getting all hung up over very specific examples of morphological analysis. It is by far better to start with the basic notion of "morphological analysis", then look at how each of these instances already mentioned meet the goals of morphological analysis. Morphological analysis means exactly what the etymology suggests: it is ...


8

He is not respected by most conservatives when he slips into theology. Textual criticism, he is very good and knows what he is doing. However, I find him sloppy in his work if it pushes his agenda. What's worse is that he knows how to do the work, but since his faith lapsed, he misapplies and misquotes the rules of determining historicity. For example, ...


8

Is it possible to be unbiased? No; everybody has biases about all sorts of things. Is it possible to bracket one's biases for the sake of open inquiry? Yes, it is. In fact, some say that bracketing is essential to study talmud (which is based in text). More broadly, there are scientific and unscientific ways of enquiring into the meaning of biblical ...


7

What is 'hermeneutics'? Hermeneutics is the field of study concerned with the philosophy and science of interpretation -- especially the interpretation of communication. "Biblical hermeneutics" is specifically concerned with the philosophy and science of interpreting the Biblical text. So Biblical hermeneutics would cover all of the following sorts of ...


7

Jews and Christians both consider the Tanakh to be important scripture (usually seen as of divine origin, though individual denominations/movements may vary). They differ in how they derive meaning from that text, however. In this answer I'm going to describe some approaches used by each group, but it's important to note that there isn't much that's ...


7

Lexical-syntactical analysis is the study of the meaning of individual words (lexicology) and the way those words are combined (syntax) in order to determine more accurately the author’s intended meaning. Virkler & Ayayo, Hermeneutics: Principles and processes of Biblical interpretation, p. 98 (2nd ed. 2007). Essentially, it's looking at the ...



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