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The Greek name Abel (Ἅβελ) is one of the indeclinable proper names in the NT. So it can have a nominative, genitive, dative, or accusative idea with the same form. Other NT mentions of Abel in context of his blood have it in a genitive relationship, but clearly as part of a construction using the genitive article and in one case a genitive apposition: Mat ...


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One of the 3 steps of the Yom Kippur ritual involved the Aaronic chief priest making atonement for his sins before approaching into the holy place. Because the priest never was made "perfect" they had to repeat this each year: YLT Heb 9:7 and into the second, once in the year, only the chief priest, not apart from blood, which he doth offer for ...


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Twice elsewhere the author of the epistle to the Hebrews uses a genitive without preceding the construct noun (in this case, the proper name) by a definite article: Heb. 9:4: ἡ ῥάβδος Ἀαρὼν ("the rod of Aaron") Heb. 11:30: τὰ τείχη Ἰεριχὼ ("the walls of Jericho") Likewise, in Heb. 12:24, τὸν Ἅβελ could stand for τὸν αἷμα Ἅβελ, where Ἅβελ is an ...


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I think that the idea of an implied "was" makes more sense contextually than "is" does because the "offering" being discussed is Jesus' death functioning as the "death introduced" to ratify the new covenant with the Jews, which would have occurred prior to the writing of the essay. In my view, though, even if an implied "is" linguistically preferred it still ...


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As you mentioned, two significant textual variants exist: ἐπ᾽ ἐσχάτων τῶν ἡμερῶν ἐσχάτων is declined in the genitive case, plural number ἐπ’ ἐσχάτου τῶν ἡμερῶν ἐσχάτου is declined in the genitive case, singular number Old Testament The English phrase "in the last days" is commonly used to translate the Hebrew phrase בְּאַחֲרִית הַיָּמִים ...


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I'm of the opinion that "To the Hebrews" would benefit from a warning/disclaimer in the preface that says something to the effect of: NOTICE: In order to understand this essay it is necessary to have a firm grasp of the rituals of Yom Kippur found in Leviticus 16. This is, I think subtly suggested in the title (which is found since the oldest ...


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He refers to the purification of sins later discussed in Hebrews chapters 9 and 10, which is the purification of all believers' sins. Textual Issue As to whose sins is being cleansed, that is only a grammatical issue in this verse if one rejects the majority text reading. That reading makes it clear that the sins being purged are those of others than ...


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I don't think the immediate context alone tells us enough to be totally sure, and unfortunately this is the only use of καθαρισμὸν in Hebrews. I'd draw on Hebrews 2:14-18 to help us out, which instead talks about the ἱλάσκεσθαι of sins: "Since therefore the children share in flesh and blood, he himself likewise partook of the same things, that through ...


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Hebrews 1:8 is continued in verse 9 which references a second god and one god is the God of the other who rewards the good service of the other with a blessing: Heb 1:9 You have loved righteousness and hated wickedness; therefore God, your God, has anointed you with the oil of gladness beyond your companions." In these two ways it is made clear that ...


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Physical Purity, of the Flesh On the Day of Atonement, the priest would make an atonement for the people of Israel to cleanse them, so that they would be clean from all their sins before Yahveh.1 30 For on this day, the priest shall make an atonement for you, to cleanse you, so that you may be clean from all your sins before Yahveh. ל כִּי בַיּוֹם ...


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Roots As has been observed, the roots of υποστασεως are ὑπο + ἵστημι. ὑπο is a preposition which sits between the English equivalents of 'by' and 'under', and so can cover a range of meanings, e.g: Matthew 3:13 - Jesus came from Galilee to the Jordan to John, to be baptized ὑπ’ him. Matthew 4:1 - Jesus was led up by the Spirit into the wilderness ...


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I contend the word is a reference to the "deep things" of God. The things that make Him immutable and immovable, and thus eminently trustworthy. ὑποστάσεως = ὑπο + ἵστημι, i.e. "underpinning stability" -- the Rock (Deuteronomy 32:4, 2 Samuel 22:47, Psalm 31:62, Psalm 62:7, Matthew 7:24-27, etc). Such deep things are only made understandable through the ...


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There are four assertions made in Hebrews 1:3 that explain how God speaking through a son is different from speaking through the prophets: Heb 1:3 He is the reflection of God's radiance, a picture of his [God's] nature and the carrier of all by his [God's] powerful sayings. After making purification for sins, he sat down at the right hand of the ...


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It came from two Greek words ἀπό (off) and αὐγή (day-light). Hence, the Greek word απαυγασμα literally means "a light shining forth from" (i.e. radiation). This radiation can either be active or passive depending on the context. ACTIVE To emit light (effulgence). PASSIVE To mirror light (reflection). The Greek word απαυγασμα carries the active sense ...


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@Revelation Lad: Philo of Alexandria or Philo Judaeus, was a Hellenistic Jewish philosopher! Philo used philosophical allegory to attempt to fuse and harmonize Greek philosophy with Jewish philosophy. His method followed the practices of both Jewish exegesis and Stoic philosophy. His allegorical exegesis was important for several Christian Church Fathers, ...


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υποστασεως (hupostaseos) means essence (Septuagint NT Greek Interlinear) or substance (Strong's concordance). "who being the radiance of the glory, and impression of his essence..." (Heb.1:3 part, Septuagint NT Greek Interlinear). ὑπόστασις (hupostasis) is that which underlies the apparent and which therefore is the reality, the essence or the substance. ...


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Definition The Greek word χαρακτηρ denotes "an engraving" (source). Translation The modern day translation "imprint" of ESV perfectly corresponds to this meaning. The translation "exact likeness" is actually not a literal translation but a dynamic equivalence. Exegesis The Lord Jesus is a copy of God's being. It means that Jesus is not the original ...


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I would render Hebrews 1:3 as: Who, not only while being a distinctive brightness of his glory and a perfect expression of the depth of his steadfastness, but also while upholding everything there is by the word of his power, having made a purification of sin, sat down at right hand of the Majesty on high. -- Hebrews 1:3 (EPV) The reasoning for this ...


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For it is impossible for the blood of bulls and goats to take away sins. Hebrews 10:4, ESV Hebrews 10:4 means something more than atonement by the phrase 'take away sins'. This verse is in the central section of Hebrews concerning the superiority of the priesthood of Jesus (chapters 8-10). Jeremiah 31 is quoted at length twice in this section which is ...


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There is one final usage in Hebrews that helps explain how the author is using the term: 18Pray for us, for we are sure that we have a clear conscience, desiring to act honorably in all things. Hebrews 13:18, ESV From this verse it is clear that the word is being used to describe a concrete difference in the heart of members of the new covenant versus ...



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