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"Without beginning of days or end of life." This same statement could be said of Abraham, or Sarah, or Israel, or Peter, or Paul. We know the lineage of Abram. We know his father was Terah, but Abraham had no beginning and end. Due to the lack of understanding of name changes in the Bible, we tend to miss the deep spiritual meaning. In Is. 43:1, the ...


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Hebrews 7:1-3: For this Melchisedec, king of Salem, priest of the most high God, who met Abraham returning from the slaughter of the kings, and blessed him; To whom also Abraham gave a tenth part of all; first being by interpretation King of righteousness, and after that also King of Salem, which is, King of peace; Without father, without mother, without ...


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The first instance, being in the perfect tense, indicates a completed past action with present results. The second instance, being in the imperfect, indicates a progressive or continuous past action. If the author of Hebrews was writing a translation of the KJV, then he should have used the same tense, possibly the aorist, but that's not the situation. ...


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The first reference is in Hebrews 3:11 where it's referring to Psalm 95:11, which is אֶל־מְנוּחָתִי (into my resting place). There are two things that this concept is being used to allude to: 1) Psalm 95 and Hebrews 3 are using it (and its Greek equivalent) to refer to the promised land. 2) Heb 4:9 uses it to allude to the Sabbath. This motif of "entering ...


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The context is pretty normative here. Heb 4:4 relates "rest" to the Sabbath: as one text says, referring to the seventh day: And God rested on the seventh day after all the work he had been doing. (NJB) Hebrews 4:5 relates it to the (final) resting "place" as well: And, again, the passage above says: They will never reach my place of rest. ...



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