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"To the Hebrews" spills a lot of ink to compare and contrast the death of Jesus to the rituals of Yom Kippur as spelled out in Leviticus 16. The purification he refers to consisted of two sacrifices; the bull which was offered to express the remorse of the priest for his sins and to appeal to God for forgiveness for himself and his household, and the first ...


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The Greek name Abel (Ἅβελ) is one of the indeclinable proper names in the NT. So it can have a nominative, genitive, dative, or accusative idea with the same form. Other NT mentions of Abel in context of his blood have it in a genitive relationship, but clearly as part of a construction using the genitive article and in one case a genitive apposition: Mat ...


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One of the 3 steps of the Yom Kippur ritual involved the Aaronic chief priest making atonement for his sins before approaching into the holy place. Because the priest never was made "perfect" they had to repeat this each year: YLT Heb 9:7 and into the second, once in the year, only the chief priest, not apart from blood, which he doth offer for ...


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Twice elsewhere the author of the epistle to the Hebrews uses a genitive construct wherein he does not precede the proper name by a definite article: Heb. 9:4: ἡ ῥάβδος Ἀαρὼν ("the rod of Aaron") Heb. 11:30: τὰ τείχη Ἰεριχὼ ("the walls of Jericho") Likewise, in Heb. 12:24, τὸν Ἅβελ could stand for τὸν αἷμα Ἅβελ, where Ἅβελ is an indeclinable proper name ...


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I think that the idea of an implied "was" makes more sense contextually than "is" does because the "offering" being discussed is Jesus' death functioning as the "death introduced" to ratify the new covenant with the Jews, which would have occurred prior to the writing of the essay. In my view, though, even if an implied "is" linguistically preferred it still ...


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As you mentioned, two significant textual variants exist: ἐπ᾽ ἐσχάτων τῶν ἡμερῶν ἐσχάτων is declined in the genitive case, plural number ἐπ’ ἐσχάτου τῶν ἡμερῶν ἐσχάτου is declined in the genitive case, singular number Old Testament The English phrase “in the last days” is commonly used to translate the Hebrew phrase בְּאַחֲרִית הַיָּמִים (...


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I'm of the opinion that "To the Hebrews" would benefit from a warning/disclaimer in the preface that says something to the effect of: NOTICE: In order to understand this essay it is necessary to have a firm grasp of the rituals of Yom Kippur found in Leviticus 16. This is, I think subtly suggested in the title (which is found since the oldest ...



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