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7

Yes, I think Jesus is the Logos mentioned in Hebrews 4:12, for a few reasons. To start with, the ESV translation: "For the word of God is living and active, sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing to the division of soul and of spirit, of joints and of marrow, and discerning the thoughts and intentions of the heart. And no creature is hidden from his ...


5

Answer: Although both Faith and Hope are functions of the "Psyche," Hope carries with it an emotional sense of "Joyful Expectation;" whereas Faith carries with it a rational sense of Certain Expectation. Luke 23:8, NASB - Now when Herod saw Jesus, he was exceedingly glad; for he had desired for a long time to see Him, because he had heard many ...


5

Background Hebrews 1:1-4 sets out a thesis that the rest of the book will unpack by way of encouraging its Christian audience to remain faithful. The author's constant appeal to the Hebrew Scriptures accounts for the traditional title, "The Letter to the Hebrews", although the book doesn't look much like a letter, and it never identifies its audience as ...


5

The short answer to the question that forms this thread's title is: "no". Unpacking that, the key words in the second half of the verse, Ἀσπάζονται ὑμᾶς οἱ ἀπὸ τῆς Ἰταλίας, simply refer to native Italians in whatever place the writer was currently located. This is a long-held view: see for example Marcus Dods' explanation in The Expositor's Greek Testament ...


4

In Heb 6:4-6, what have those once enlightened “fallen away” from? Here we see a most solemn declaration being set forth by the author of Hebrews; the antithesis of the progress he desired his readers to make. The basic premise is if you are not moving forward, you are dropping back. But such a superficial will not serve our purpose here. What they have ...


4

An important piece of evidence that provides a partial answer for this question comes from the Dead Sea Scrolls (DSS). 11Q13 A large number of fragments were found in Cave 11, among them a text known as 11Q13 or 11QMelchizedek. In brief (and quoting the "About" text from the DeadSeaScrolls.org.il site),1 it is a short text which focuses on ...


4

Good question! The Greek ending -σμοσ makes a noun out of a verb. The verb "σαββατιζο", as used by Plutarch and Justin Martyr about keeping the sabbath, therefore becomes "the result of keeping the sabbath". In a similar way, "inflate", the act of increasing the size of something, becomes "inflation", the result of increasing the size of something. It ...


4

Walking through the first part of Hebrews 1:1 begins with "God spoke to our fathers by the prophets," 1:2 declares now God "has spoken to us by his Son, whom he appointed the heir of all things," 1:3-4 makes both a statement of Christ's nature and work that equates the Son with God, but also as the most exalted of creation as man (v.4) 1:5-14 then ...


3

It is easy to show that Paul did not write the Epistle to the Hebrews, in fact that is the view of almost all modern scholars, who generally do not regard Hebrews as an epistle at all. Although attributed to Paul quite early, even many of the Church Fathers expressed doubts about Pauline authorship. When considering other possible authors, Luke was not among ...


3

I hope you realise that ancient Greek manuscripts did not usually have punctuation. The comma was added by modern translators to clarify what they took to be the correct interpretation. The original in Hebrews 10:12 reads: οὗτος δὲ μίαν ὑπὲρ ἁμαρτιῶν προσενέγκας θυσίαν εἰς τὸ διηνεκὲς ἐκάθισεν ἐν δεξιᾷ τοῦ θεοῦ. From a grammatical point of view εἰς τὸ ...


3

Hermeneutics is not only about the deductive approach to interpreting Scripture (for example, grammar and syntax) but also the inductive approach, which is to infer the generalization from several pieces of information -- sort of connecting the dots. In other words, hermeneutics is both an art (subjective) and science (objective). The concept of the Sabbath ...


3

The NWT translation rests on two quirks of Greek. Ὁ θρόνος σου ὁ θεὸς εἰς τὸν αἰῶνα τοῦ αἰῶνος, ...(SBLGNT) the throne of you the God into the age of the age, ...(my nearly word-for-word translation) First, the nominative case and the vocative case often share the same forms. So the original passage has two occurrences of the word form "ὁ" ("the") ...


3

This answer is largely adapted from Paul Ellingworth, The Epistle to the Hebrews: A Commentary on the Greek Text, 1993. For more see pages 237ff. The main point of this verse is to apply Psalm 95:7-11 and set the stage for the soon-to-be-quoted Genesis 2:2 in the next verse. It is helpful to consider the context: Let us fear therefore, lest perhaps ...


3

About Another Possible Translation Your second question is: Is there any other translation possible from the Greek text beside that which the KJV translators produced? The clear answer to that has to be "yes," since many other translations do it: ESV: For surely it is not angels that he helps, but he helps the offspring of Abraham. NASB: ...


2

Short Answer: It's Significance Leads to some Ambiguity in Focus There are two pertinent syntactical factors here1 First, Daniel Wallace notes, nouns as objects of prepositions (ἐν here) are a case where regularly definiteness is inherent even though the article is lacking. Here is his statement, but then note what is in the midst of this about Heb 1:2... ...


2

In the Greek New Testament, there seems to be the distinction between the Tabernacle and the Temple, which "houses" the Tabernacle. For the example, both the Greek word for "temple" (ναός) and "tabernacle" (σκηνή) occur together in the following verse. Revelation 15:5 Καὶ μετὰ ταῦτα εἶδον, καὶ ἠνοίγη ὁ ναὸς τῆς σκηνῆς τοῦ μαρτυρίου ἐν τῷ οὐρανῷ... ...


2

To be in God's "Resting Place" is to be in His tabernacle (mshknuth). This is the place of rest; this is also the place where the brazen altar, the altar of incense, lampstand, and the Holy of Holies are found. Until Solomon's Temple (approx. 1000 BC), the tabernacle was where God dwelt, all the laws concerning worship, sacrifices, rituals were prescribed ...


2

Short Answer It is a condition that can not actually exist, an absurdity. It is the consequence of an argument presented in the form reductio ad adsurdum, a "reduction to absurdity." In one of its forms, this type of argument takes a set of premises to its logical conclusion and shows the results lead to an absurdity, thus demonstrating the invalidity of ...


2

The Apostle Paul makes the first logical connection of Jesus as the "Word" through references to the Book of Deuteronomy. Romans 10:5-9 (NASB) 5 For Moses writes that the man who practices the righteousness which is based on law shall live by that righteousness. 6 But the righteousness based on faith speaks as follows: “Do not say in your heart, ‘Who ...


2

The promises referred to in Hebrews 11:13 are the promises God made to the patriarchs, but which find their fullest expression in the "better promises" of the New Covenant (8:6). All the promises of God ultimately find their fulfilment in Christ (2 Corinthians 1:20;). It is to these men and women of faith (Hebrews 11) that the writer of the letter to the ...


2

While I admire all the theological, philosophical, philological and hermeneutical acumen displayed in the other answers and comments, I believe that an analogy drawn from human affairs is much more satisfactory. In fact it perfectly highlights the difference. [Faith] Suppose that you have built a relationship of trust with a person. Suppose this person ...


2

The Idea in Brief The relationship between faith, hope, and love appears in correspondence to the three crowns of rewards mentioned in the New Testament. If this correspondence, or alignment, is correct, then specific nuances appear that discriminate the meaning between faith and hope. Discussion There are three crowns of reward found in the New ...


1

The free-download Interlinear Scripture Analyzer allows users to search clauses in the Greek New Testament in various ways. For example, please click here. We see that there are nine instances in the Textus Receptus version of the Greek New Testament, where the Greek words occur together in the phrase with some [Prep] (Preposition) + some [t_Acc] (Article ...


1

I don't have time to respond to this question fully, but let me offer this outline of an answer: No, I don't believe Hebrews 4:12 should be understood to referring to Jesus directly. There is no reason to suggest that the author of Hebrews had John 1 in mind as he penned this verse (much less Rev 19). Before looking at other authors in Scripture, it is ...


1

The question is, “What does the word αἰῶνας refer to?” The Greek word αἰῶνας is the accusative plural declension of the root word αἰών. The Greek word αἰών is a third-declension, masculine-gender, nasal-stem noun. BDAG defines it as “(1) a long period of time, without reference to beginning or end; (2) a segment of time as a particular unit of history, age; ...


1

There is nothing in the Hebrew Bible that says that Abraham was "to inherit the world," but that is exactly what the Christian New Testament states (Romans 4:13). Thus since the world will be blessed through Abraham, he is therefore by implication greater than those blessed, and therefore he (Abraham) will inherit the world. In like manner, Melchizedek ...


1

This statement is without source in the Hebrew Bible or in Jewish traditions. In the Midrash, using a “closed-canon”¹ approach, Melchizedek is identified as Shem son of Noah. The author of Hebrews seems to be using the same sort of closed-canon approach, but attaching Melchizedek to Jesus. ¹ By “closed-canon” I mean the identification of one person, whose ...



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