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6

Hebrews 7:1-3: For this Melchisedec, king of Salem, priest of the most high God, who met Abraham returning from the slaughter of the kings, and blessed him; To whom also Abraham gave a tenth part of all; first being by interpretation King of righteousness, and after that also King of Salem, which is, King of peace; Without father, without mother, without ...


6

Restatement: What is the difference between Faith and Hope, in New Testament texts? Evidently, the usage of the Greek words, "Faith" and "Hope", are clearly distinct from each other, even used in the same sentence, so it seems there must be a notable difference between the two. Answer: "Hope" bears with it an emotional sense of "Joyful Expectation" ...


4

The NWT translation rests on two quirks of Greek. Ὁ θρόνος σου ὁ θεὸς εἰς τὸν αἰῶνα τοῦ αἰῶνος, ...(SBLGNT) the throne of you the God into the age of the age, ...(my nearly word-for-word translation) First, the nominative case and the vocative case often share the same forms. So the original passage has two occurrences of the word form "ὁ" ("the") ...


4

The Idea in Brief The Hebrew verb to pierce (כָּרָה = H3738) in Psalm 40:6 is the same triliteral root for the Hebrew verb to prepare (כָּרָה = H3739). For example, this second verb (כָּרָה = H3739) appears translated in 2 Ki 6:23 as "prepared." In other words, both verbs have the exact same triliteral root, but have different meanings. The LXX translators ...


4

The writer of Hebrews demonstrates an extensive knowledge of the Old Testament and the LXX in particular. Sheepskin In Hebrews 11:37 we read ἐλιθάσθησαν, ἐπρίσθησαν, ἐν φόνῳ μαχαίρης ἀπέθανον, περιῆλθον ἐν μηλωταῖς (sheep skin), ἐν αἰγείοις δέρμασιν, ὑστερούμενοι, θλιβόμενοι, κακουχούμενοι. The LXX has five references to the same same word all in ...


4

Walking through the first part of Hebrews 1:1 begins with "God spoke to our fathers by the prophets," 1:2 declares now God "has spoken to us by his Son, whom he appointed the heir of all things," 1:3-4 makes both a statement of Christ's nature and work that equates the Son with God, but also as the most exalted of creation as man (v.4) 1:5-14 then ...


3

I hope you realise that ancient Greek manuscripts did not usually have punctuation. The comma was added by modern translators to clarify what they took to be the correct interpretation. The original in Hebrews 10:12 reads: οὗτος δὲ μίαν ὑπὲρ ἁμαρτιῶν προσενέγκας θυσίαν εἰς τὸ διηνεκὲς ἐκάθισεν ἐν δεξιᾷ τοῦ θεοῦ. From a grammatical point of view εἰς τὸ ...


3

It is easy to show that Paul did not write the Epistle to the Hebrews, in fact that is the view of almost all modern scholars, who generally do not regard Hebrews as an epistle at all. Although attributed to Paul quite early, even many of the Church Fathers expressed doubts about Pauline authorship. When considering other possible authors, Luke was not among ...


2

I could be wrong but I believe you are assuming that the LXX is translated from the Masoretic and thus this would seem a poor translation of the MT, However, The 72 translators of the LXX did not use the MT to translate the LXX. There is not a surviving copy of the Hebrew that the LXX was translated from and thus your question as I understand it cannot be ...


2

Take note that Hebrew 1 shows that Jesus is different from the angels in that he is related ontologically with God the Father that is why it's really more probable that the author of Hebrews wanted to convey that Jesus is God (in the strictess sense of the word) who sits on an everlasting throne because the immediate context shows that Jesus is God's only ...


2

The promises referred to in Hebrews 11:13 are the promises God made to the patriarchs, but which find their fullest expression in the "better promises" of the New Covenant (8:6). All the promises of God ultimately find their fulfilment in Christ (2 Corinthians 1:20;). It is to these men and women of faith (Hebrews 11) that the writer of the letter to the ...


2

While I admire all the theological, philosophical, philological and hermeneutical acumen displayed in the other answers and comments, I believe that an analogy drawn from human affairs is much more satisfactory. In fact it perfectly highlights the difference. [Faith] Suppose that you have built a relationship of trust with a person. Suppose this person ...


2

The Idea in Brief The relationship between faith, hope, and love appears in correspondence to the three crowns of rewards mentioned in the New Testament. If this correspondence, or alignment, is correct, then specific nuances appear that discriminate the meaning between faith and hope. Discussion There are three crowns of reward found in the New ...


2

Yes, the Aaronic priesthood was established many centuries after Abram met Melchizedek the priest, according to the timeline of the biblical story. But priesthood is not unique to the religion of YHWH. Many religions, then as now, have priests. The Hebrew Bible also mentions priests of Egypt (e.g. Gen.47:22) and Midian (e.g. Ex.2:16) prior to the ...


1

Jacob is correct that the audience is somewhat of a mystery (though we do know quite a bit about them), but incorrect that this leaves us unable to answer your question. The New Covenant believers addressed in Hebrews met in homes (as did every other New Covenant congregation prior to the 3rd century). They met over a meal, sometimes called the "love ...


1

Im going to go out on a limb and say no we don't know where the Christians in Hebrews 10:25 had their assemblies. There appears to be no internal or external evidence to suggest this passage implies a particular type or size of meeting. The reason for this answer is that reputable commentaries aren't even on agreement on the matter of who Hebrews was ...


1

A subject (A) in the nominative case plus οὐ δύναται plus infinitive (B) and ἀδύνατον plus a noun (A) in the accusative case plus an infinitive (B) are both correct classical Greek ways of saying "A cannot do B". There is no difference in meaning. See, for example, Smyth §2000 - §2002.


1

The grammatical structure found in Hebrews 6:6 appears to be the impersonal use of the predicate adjective in the neuter case (nominative singular form). That is, “it is impossible..." The subject is an infinitive, general thought (Smyth §1047), or statement of general truth (Smyth §1048). In other words, this grammatical structure is a blanket statement of ...


1

The first reference is in Hebrews 3:11 where it's referring to Psalm 95:11, which is אֶל־מְנוּחָתִי (into my resting place). There are two things that this concept is being used to allude to: 1) Psalm 95 and Hebrews 3 are using it (and its Greek equivalent) to refer to the promised land. 2) Heb 4:9 uses it to allude to the Sabbath. This motif of "entering ...


1

The context is pretty normative here. Heb 4:4 relates "rest" to the Sabbath: as one text says, referring to the seventh day: And God rested on the seventh day after all the work he had been doing. (NJB) Hebrews 4:5 relates it to the (final) resting "place" as well: And, again, the passage above says: They will never reach my place of rest. ...


1

The first instance, being in the perfect tense, indicates a completed past action with present results. The second instance, being in the imperfect, indicates a progressive or continuous past action. If the author of Hebrews was writing a translation of the KJV, then he should have used the same tense, possibly the aorist, but that's not the situation. ...


1

The free-download Interlinear Scripture Analyzer allows users to search clauses in the Greek New Testament in various ways. For example, please click here. We see that there are nine instances in the Textus Receptus version of the Greek New Testament, where the Greek words occur together in the phrase with some [Prep] (Preposition) + some [t_Acc] (Article ...


1

Faith has a variety of applications. For example it can be to believe something specific requiring discernment in each instance and it is used to denote the covenant of eternal inheritance in contrast to Sinai. When used with hope Paul is drawing on the deeply entrenched and traditional Rabbinic teaching of emunah and bitachon - faith and trust - a very ...


1

The Idea in Brief The soul is the very life that all living creatures appear to share. (Thus no cadaver, whether man or animal, possesses the "nephesh.") However, only human beings possess the spirit, which appears to be the "Image of God." Discussion The passage of Hebrews 4:12 appears to discriminate between the material and immaterial aspects of the ...



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