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Historically there is a clear distinction between the king and the high priest. The first was always from the tribe of Judah and the second from the tribe of Levi. Even if there are examples of kings that also were priests, that was never an accepted order. Still Jesus is claimed to be the Messiah (King): Jesus and his disciples went on to the villages ...


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Background Hebrews 1:1-4 sets out a thesis that the rest of the book will unpack by way of encouraging its Christian audience to remain faithful. The author's constant appeal to the Hebrew Scriptures accounts for the traditional title, "The Letter to the Hebrews", although the book doesn't look much like a letter, and it never identifies its audience as ...


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The short answer to the question that forms this thread's title is: "no". Unpacking that, the key words in the second half of the verse, Ἀσπάζονται ὑμᾶς οἱ ἀπὸ τῆς Ἰταλίας, simply refer to native Italians in whatever place the writer was currently located. This is a long-held view: see for example Marcus Dods' explanation in The Expositor's Greek Testament ...


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In Heb 6:4-6, what have those once enlightened “fallen away” from? Here we see a most solemn declaration being set forth by the author of Hebrews; the antithesis of the progress he desired his readers to make. The basic premise is if you are not moving forward, you are dropping back. But such a superficial will not serve our purpose here. What they have ...


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An important piece of evidence that provides a partial answer for this question comes from the Dead Sea Scrolls (DSS). 11Q13 A large number of fragments were found in Cave 11, among them a text known as 11Q13 or 11QMelchizedek. In brief (and quoting the "About" text from the DeadSeaScrolls.org.il site),1 it is a short text which focuses on ...


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The author of Hebrews is not identifying Melchizedek as a pre-incarnate appearance of Jesus or what have you, but as a type or pattern for Jesus' priesthood. Argument From Chronology The first thing to note is that this passage is a reflection on the Melchizedek narrative in Genesis through the lens of Psalm 110, which was introduced back in 5:6 ...


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I will answer the first part of the question by referring to John Owen's condensed (Crossway Christian Classics) explanation: First, Melchizedek was a mere man and no more than a man. For “every high priest is selected from among men” (5:1). So the Son of God himself could not have been a priest if he had not assumed our nature. If Melchizedek was more ...


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Good question! The Greek ending -σμοσ makes a noun out of a verb. The verb "σαββατιζο", as used by Plutarch and Justin Martyr about keeping the sabbath, therefore becomes "the result of keeping the sabbath". In a similar way, "inflate", the act of increasing the size of something, becomes "inflation", the result of increasing the size of something. It ...


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The Greek text of Heb. 9:4 is, χρυσοῦν ἔχουσα θυμιατήριον καὶ τὴν κιβωτὸν τῆς διαθήκης περικεκαλυμμένην πάντοθεν χρυσίῳ ἐν ᾗ στάμνος χρυσῆ ἔχουσα τὸ μάννα καὶ ἡ ῥάβδος Ἀαρὼν ἡ βλαστήσασα καὶ αἱ πλάκες τῆς διαθήκης The phrase in question is χρυσοῦν θυμιατήριον (chrysoun thymiatērion). Both the accusative and nominative declension are spelled ...


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In the Greek New Testament, there seems to be the distinction between the Tabernacle and the Temple, which "houses" the Tabernacle. For the example, both the Greek word for "temple" (ναός) and "tabernacle" (σκηνή) occur together in the following verse. Revelation 15:5 Καὶ μετὰ ταῦτα εἶδον, καὶ ἠνοίγη ὁ ναὸς τῆς σκηνῆς τοῦ μαρτυρίου ἐν τῷ οὐρανῷ... ...


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To be in God's "Resting Place" is to be in His tabernacle (mshknuth). This is the place of rest; this is also the place where the brazen altar, the altar of incense, lampstand, and the Holy of Holies are found. Until Solomon's Temple (approx. 1000 BC), the tabernacle was where God dwelt, all the laws concerning worship, sacrifices, rituals were prescribed ...


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Short Answer It is a condition that can not actually exist, an absurdity. It is the consequence of an argument presented in the form reductio ad adsurdum, a "reduction to absurdity." In one of its forms, this type of argument takes a set of premises to its logical conclusion and shows the results lead to an absurdity, thus demonstrating the invalidity of ...


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The question is, “What does the word αἰῶνας refer to?” The Greek word αἰῶνας is the accusative plural declension of the root word αἰών. The Greek word αἰών is a third-declension, masculine-gender, nasal-stem noun. BDAG defines it as “(1) a long period of time, without reference to beginning or end; (2) a segment of time as a particular unit of history, age; ...


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Hermeneutics is not only about the deductive approach to interpreting Scripture (for example, grammar and syntax) but also the inductive approach, which is to infer the generalization from several pieces of information -- sort of connecting the dots. In other words, hermeneutics is both an art (subjective) and science (objective). The concept of the Sabbath ...


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There is nothing in the Hebrew Bible that says that Abraham was "to inherit the world," but that is exactly what the Christian New Testament states (Romans 4:13). Thus since the world will be blessed through Abraham, he is therefore by implication greater than those blessed, and therefore he (Abraham) will inherit the world. In like manner, Melchizedek ...


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This statement is without source in the Hebrew Bible or in Jewish traditions. In the Midrash, using a “closed-canon”¹ approach, Melchizedek is identified as Shem son of Noah. The author of Hebrews seems to be using the same sort of closed-canon approach, but attaching Melchizedek to Jesus. ¹ By “closed-canon” I mean the identification of one person, whose ...


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The Devil is considered a prince of a kingdom. To be a prince he must have some kind of power that he wields over his subjects. If we said a king has the power of wealth, we mean he has a lot of money and that he exerts a lot of influence by it. In the same way the 'power of sin' or 'power of death' is something one can have and exert influence with. The ...


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Short Answer: Yes, the "fear of death" refers to being afraid of physically dying, as shown by the context in which it is used. The point is that Christ's solidarity with His people gave His people hope, thereby freeing them up to live the life He was calling them to without concern for what it might cost them. The passage is not about unbelievers and ...


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To an unbeliever, there are two deaths. First the physical death, then the eternal death. An unbeliever will not acknowledge the second and therefore can only fear the physical. "But the fearful, and unbelieving, and the abominable, and murderers, and whoremongers, and sorcerers, and idolaters, and all liars, shall have their part in the lake which burneth ...


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I seek only to supplement the answers already proposed with a comparison of my own: If I marry, I hope to learn to be a good husband. This does not mean that I am a bad husband now - I'm simply not a husband. But in order to learn to be a good husband, I must marry and understand what the role of a husband truly entails. Similarly, if I have kids, I hope ...


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It only means that Jesus gained experiential knowledge about obeying the Father on earth not that he is disobedient. Before his incarnation, the Son of God doesn't have an experience to obey God in the flesh with suffering for the obvious reason that he wasn't yet incarnated but once incarnated he now can learn obedience through suffering as Hebrews 5:8 ...



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