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The Hebrew Phrase נִשְׁמַת חַיִּים In Gen. 2:7, it is written, And Yahveh God formed the man from the dust of the earth, and He blew into his nostrils the (נִשְׁמַת חַיִּים), and the man became a living soul. וַיִּיצֶר יַהְוֶה אֱלֹהִים אֶת הָאָדָם עָפָר מִן הָאֲדָמָה וַיִּפַּח בְּאַפָּיו נִשְׁמַת חַיִּים וַיְהִי הָאָדָם לְנֶפֶשׁ חַיָּה Whatever ...


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looking up waters in Hebrew I find the word was the 13th letter in Hebrew alphabet and the meaning has several related meanings waters / people /nations/languages and tongues. I believe it to be meant to be the people or angels of the first heaven that were being separated and the firmament was then called the new heaven. God faithful were to remain above ...


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"Doe of the Dawn" appears to be an accurate translation. אַיָּלָה (ʾayyālāh) means "doe". (Morphologically, it is the feminine of אַיָּל, meaning "deer.") The word in question, אַיֶּ֥לֶת (ʾayyelet), is the construct form: "doe of...". The following word שַׁ֫חַר (šaḥar) is a common word for "dawn." It is prefixed with the definite article making the whole ...


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Exodus 29:1 gives Yahweh's instructions for the consecration of priests as, one young bull and two rams without blemish. All of the versions have "AND". Knowing Yahweh's requirements, Abijah has his tongue firmly planted in his cheek when he says to Jeroboam (with the conjunction as it should be): ... so that whosoever cometh to consecrate himself with ...


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The conjunction waw can mean "or" in some cases. Here's Joüon-Muraoka (formatting mine): The idea represented by the Engl[ish] or is usually expressed by אוֹ... But instead of this precise word, a Waw often suffices, e.g. [2 Sam 2:19:] לא־נָטָה לָלֶ֫כֶת עַל־הַיָּמִין וְעַל־הַשְּׂמֹאל he did not turn aside right or (nor) left, ...


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The phrase is translated correct. Train up a child in the way he should go, And when he is old he will not depart from it. There is nothing in the text indicating a vocation by which a child is to be trained or dedicated except in the way "he should go." The Scriptures are consistent that "the way" is the way that is right before God (Psa. 119:133; ...


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No, there is very little literary evidence that the New Testament writers relied on the Hebrew texts. The New Testament was written entirely in Greek and it seems likely that few if any of the authors even knew the Hebrew texts. I will provide some examples of their consistent use of the Greek texts when citing the Hebrew scriptures. It is almost ...


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Your Title question doesn’t make clear which manuscripts you’re referring to – Masoretic texts, Septuagint ones, Koine Greek, original autographs, copies, translated ones, e.g. the Latin Vulgate? What do you mean when you say ‘written’? Do you mean what type of paper/parchment were they written on? Were they written in uncials or miniscules? Were they in ...


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but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil you shall not eat, for in the day (בְּי֛וֹם) that you eat of it you shall surely die.” (Genesis 2:17, NKJV) but you must not eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, for when you eat from it you will certainly die.” (Genesis 2:17, NIV) Which is the correct translation? Bible Gateway ...



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