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Context Hosea 3:4 is part of a brief "reprise" of the "prophet-as-symbol" in his relationship with an unfaithful woman/spouse. (The terms of their relationship and the connection between Hosea 1 and 3 are matters of discussion, even dispute, among interpreters.) Here it appears to be part of a redemption scene, as the woman is taken into the prophet's ...


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I found this in Rashi's Commentary; nor pillar: The pillar of Baal in Samaria of the kings of Israel מַצֵּבָה (matstsebah) is translated "pillar", and the word is used in 32 occurrences. Since Hosea probably prophesied during the time of the Assyrian Dispersion; see here, he would have seen the 'pillar' of Baal which is described in 2 Kings 10:27, ...


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Possibly a Distinction of Land vs. People Davïd's answer pointed out some useful cross references with מלך (MLK) in relation to the prepositions. An observation of those indicated to me the possibility the author is distinguishing with the prepositions a difference between land area controlled versus people ruled over (geographic versus personal). The ...


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In the Book of Hosea, Hosea expresses intense anger because of Israel's worship of other gods. In verse 1:2, Hosea likens the unfaithfulness of Israel to his own wife, Gomer’s later unfaithfulness to him. The following verses are full of this symbolism. Verses 3:1-3 refer to Hosea’s personal relationship, but its meaning is also debated among scholars. ...


4

There are two, possibly inter-related, issues here. One is the preposition expected with the root mlk in the hifil; the other is the relationship between the prepositions ʾel and ʿal. 1. MLK + ?? Typically the verb mlk takes the preposition ʿal, "rule over", and in the Hifil it appears so on at least six occasions (1 Sam. 12:1; 2 Ki. 8:20; 1 Chr. 28:4; 2 ...


1

I would assign three speakers in this verse as follows: וְנִלְווּ גוֹיִם רַבִּים אֶל יהוה בַּיּוֹם הַהוּא (the prophet Zechariah) וְהָיוּ לִי לְעָם וְשָׁכַנְתִּי בְתוֹכֵךְ (G-d) וְיָדַעַתְּ כִּי יהוה צְבָאוֹת שְׁלָחַנִי אֵלָיִךְ (the Messiah) The first sentence is typical language we would expect to see in any of the Prophetic writings. The second ...


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The preposition אֶל generally means "to" or "towards" while עַל is usually translated as "over" or "upon." The explanation for the author's use of אֶל versus עַל is the former was used for cities which were far from Jerusalem while the latter was used for places which are near. If we assume that Ish-Bosheth's throne was in Jerusalem, then the tribes of ...


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There are numerous passages in scripture that refer to the idea of God 'concealing' stuff; e.g. mystery and parable and understanding, wisdom and folly, light and darkness... Luke 8:9 'His disciples asked him what this parable meant. 10 He said, “The knowledge of the secrets of the kingdom of God has been given to you, but to others I speak in parables, so ...


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The Idea in Brief The following explanation provides one tentative view based on Jewish oral tradition. That is, the Babylonian Talmud provides one possible explanation as to why there are two paragogic nuns in this verse. Discussion First, the editors of the Masoretic Text finalized their written work during the Ninth and Tenth Centuries of the current ...


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It's safe to say the statement in question, which occurs three times in 2 Samuel chapter 1, is a declarative sentence, complete with an exclamation point in English. As my link points out, ancient Hebrew gives us clues to the emotional freight of a sentence by providing us with a key word, as opposed to a punctuation mark in English. One such word is ...


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Given the context that's being addressed, the Cannanite priests did dress as women during their religious rituals. So the "Lie, the lying of the women", would be an accurate reference of that cultic reference point in history. The [as with] is added in English to construct a homosexual narrative based on the presumption that homosexuality is being ...


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The great medieval rabbi and scholar now known as Rashi wrote commentaries on the Hebrew Bible. He is acclaimed for his ability to present the basic meaning of the text in a concise and lucid fashion, and his works remain a centrepiece of contemporary Jewish study. Rashi's commentary on Proverbs chapter 25 (including 25:2) is as follows: The honor of ...


1

Genesis 1:1-2, in fact, can be equally translated in two ways; by taking the Hebrew word 'b-reishit' either as a 'construct' or in the 'absolute'. This fact, in itself, renders the possibility of translating the first two verses (Gensis 1:1-2) into two strikingly different but equally valid translations. These two equally valid translations in turn give us ...


2

I'm going to make this simple because a lot of folks want to over-complicate things. The translation you use -- "Thou shalt not revile the gods, nor curse the ruler of thy people," simply doesn't make any sense when Deuteronomy 12:2-3 teaches that one must destroy idols and things associated with idol worship -- which strikes me as a good way to revile the ...


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Although I have my qualms about the particular way that OP has formulated the question, it is an interesting one and could be sharply focused on two texts -- or textual clusters -- in the Hebrew Bible. Terms must be distinguished; I would do it this way: polytheism is the belief that there are many gods who require devotion; henotheism is the belief that ...


2

The Shema (שמע) in Deu. 6:4 is the classic expression of Israel's monotheistic faith. English Translation: Listen, Israel! Yahveh is our God, Yahveh is the only one! or Listen, Israel! Yahveh is our God, Yahveh alone! English Transliteration: Shema Yisra’el! Yahveh eloheinu, Yahveh echad! Hebrew Text: שְׁמַע יִשְׂרָאֵל יַהְוֶה ...


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From: B. Waltke and M. O'Connor, An Introduction to Biblical Hebrew Syntax (Eisenbrauns, 1990), § 21.2.3e, p. 361: +-------------+------+------------+------+ | Occurrences | Roots used* | | # % | # % | +----------+-------------+------+------------+------+ | Qal | 49180 | ...


4

The words apply to the idols. In reading this in English translation, the KJV is obscure, although with some effort you can read it as having this meaning; the NIV is much better: "Like a scarecrow in a cucumber field, their idols cannot speak; they must be carried because they cannot walk ..." The NAB is clear and gives us the picture Jeremiah had in mind. ...


2

The Idea in Brief When viewed through the lens of Jewish tradition, the suggested literal translation of the verse would appear as follows: Gen 2:12 And gold of the land is good: there [one finds] the yellow and the red stone. The second clause (after the colon) would modify and expand upon the first clause. In this regard, the Babylonian Talmud ...


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Superscripts were added to many of the Old Testament books and psalms by scribes, mostly during the Exilic or post-Exilic period. The superscript to Song of Solomon, "The Song of Songs, which is Solomon’s," only says that it is the best song ("song of songs") that belongs to Solomon. This reference to Solomon could mean that Solomon wrote it or that it was ...


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The staff was a symbol of authority. Moses lifted his up and the river parted, Moses hit the rock with it and water gushed out. The prophet's staff was a symbol of the authority of God that was with him and working through him. Elisha sending his staff, was like Elisha sending himself to be there. (similar to Paul sending cloths from his body to others)



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