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tl;dr The Hebrew is also ambiguous. In the Hebrew: ‏ (16) וְֽהוֹשִׁיעָ֞ם יְהוָ֧ה אֱלֹהֵיהֶ֛ם בַּיּ֥וֹם הַה֖וּא כְּצֹ֣אן עַמּ֑וֹ כִּ֚י אַבְנֵי־נֵ֔זֶר מִֽתְנוֹסְס֖וֹת עַל־אַדְמָתֽוֹ׃ (17) כִּ֥י מַה־טּוּב֖וֹ וּמַה־יָפְי֑וֹ דָּגָן֙ בַּֽחוּרִ֔ים וְתִיר֖וֹשׁ יְנוֹבֵ֥ב בְּתֻלֽוֹת׃ ‎ (Westminster Leningrad Codex) The words translated "How wonderful ...


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The verse begins by referring to "אֶפְרֹחִים אֹו בֵיצִים" ("chicks or eggs"). It then refers to "בָּנִים", which, while translated as "young", literally means "sons", and here means "children". Since both the chicks and the eggs are the children of the mother, the terms "אֶפְרֹחִים אֹו בֵיצִים" and "בָּנִים" are equivalent, and one may eat both the chicks ...


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tl;dr There is no basis for "bride" in the original Hebrew. The Hebrew text of Exodus 11:1b is: כְּשַׁ֨לְּח֔וֹ כָּלָ֕ה גָּרֵ֛שׁ יְגָרֵ֥שׁ אֶתְכֶ֖ם מִזֶּֽה׃ (Westminster Leningrad Codex) The word which is translated by REB as "bride" is the word "כָּלָה". The word "כָּלָה" (vocalized here with a qamatz below the kaph and no dagesh in the lamedh) means ...


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Your answer began at Isaiah 53:8.' Who shall declare his generation ? that of the suffering servant and verse 11 which speaks of the travail of his soul which allude to Hannah in her barrenness. The desolate is the nations of gentiles, the married wife is the Jews. Read Paul treatise to the Romans especially Romans 2:28,29. 54:6,7 refer to the gentiles who ...


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I don't think you can distinguish too much between the two; since the Jewish calendar is a lunar calendar, all "sacred seasons" are based on the lunar cycle. That being said, in the context of this psalm. it would seem to be merely speaking of how things are ordered in the sense of time keeping. The section from verses 19 through 30 seems to be related and ...


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The Hebrew word for man is אָדָם (adam) or אּישׁ (ish). The "out of man" (מֵאִ֖ישׁ meish, also transliterated me’iysh) in this passage derives from the latter form. Like in Gen 2:23, ish often carries a definite connection with males (as opposed to "mankind"), but has a variety of uses. You can explore the usage of all forms of ish here and meish here. ...


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Interestingly, despite there being several good answers here, no one has yet raised the possibility that the word ראם (re'em) refers to an animal known as the aurochs or urus (Bos primigenius). (Edit: Bruce James' answer does say "the ראם is a type of cow", which would be consistent with the aurochs conclusion.) Around the turn of the twentieth century ...


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The word ראם (re'em) likely refers to a specific animal known as the aurochs or urus (Bos primigenius) which is now extinct. The Akkadian cognate rimu, which is known to refer to this animal based on archaeological finds, supports this theory. The aurochs is a "grand wild ox", so translators using "wild ox" are following this theory, using a relatable ...


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"Ruah" literally means "wind," but can be used to mean "spirit" in some contexts. The phrasing: "hinnabe el..." is used throughout the book of Ezekiel to mean "prophesy about..." or "prophesy to...." Unlike any other prophet, Ezekiel likes to prophesy about inanimate and physical things. Here are the instances: 6:1 - prophesy about the mountains of Israel ...


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"Prophesy" [בא] BA = come. [נבא] NBA = Ni-VA = (nif-al) simple-passive of come = that which is coming, impending. [נבא] then becomes a nifal passive derivative "root word" - an example where some soresh types are actually derivatives of more fundamental soresh types. [באי] B_i = imperative/cohortative towards 2nd person feminine = instruct you-girl to ...


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ותצחק שרה and laughing Sarah בקרבה within herself לאמר to say אחרי בלתי after I am without/lack היתה לי her-exist/become of me עדנה her-make-pleasure ואדני זקן and my lord-husband is bearded/old You should simply read the passage at its face value. Sarah laughing within herself to say, after I lack/lose my liveliness, have pleasure and my ...



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