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No, traditional English translations render שֵׁם־יְהוָה correctly as a phrase: e.g. “Look! The name of Yahweh comes from afar ...” (LEB). Though name and YHWH are linked in the Masoretic text by a maqqef or 'Hebrew hyphen', this indicates to speakers that the second word is accented, not the first. It’s a function of pronunciation, not meaning. The ...


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The very short answer is: "no". For the Greek Septuagint see NETS; for the Aramaic Targumim see the Aramaic Bible series; for the Hebrew Masoretic Text, any reliable public translation will do. These textual traditions are sufficiently distinct that it would not make sense to have an amalgamated edition (which is what I take it is meant by "all combined ...


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The Idea in Brief The Masoretic Text and Babylonian Talmud provide compelling insights. First, the Masoretic Text provides structure through the cantillation marks and accents to help understand how the words related one to another. In this respect, the cantillation and accent marks provide no direct relationship between the word אָדָם (Adam) and the word ...


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The Septuagint has (Hosea 6:7): αὐτοὶ δέ εἰσιν ὡς ἄνθρωπος παραβαίνων διαθήκην· ἐκεῖ κατεφρόνησέ μου Translating the passage in question from the Septuagint gives: they are like a man that transgresses a covenant; (...) That is, the reading for "כאדם" is "ὡς ἄνθρωπος" which means "like a man". The Septuagint was made with much older Hebrew ...


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OP has already done a fine job in identifying the problem, and setting out solutions. The majority of modern commentators take ...ʾādām here as a reference to a place name, "Adam" (as in Joshua 3:16, as noted by OP). The notion that the following šām "there" requires a place-name as antecedent, and that the only viable candidate is ...ʾādām, is widely found ...


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The Babylonian Talmud (Baba Batra, Folio 15A) indicates that Hezekiah had redacted Qohelet as well as several other texts of Hebrew Scriptures. Please click on the image below to view the entire passage from Talmud. The Talmud seems to indicate that editors under the authority of Hezekiah compiled several texts of Scripture. For example, many scholars ...


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What is the new covenant made with Jews/Israel in Jeremiah 31:31 Jeremiah 31:31 Behold, the days come, saith the LORD, that I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel, and with the house of Judah: Jesus came preaching that the Kingdom was at hand. Jesus said that his death was to establish the new covenant (testament). Luke 22:20 ...


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Perhaps the best way to describe the "Elohim/elohiym" is the "One God" has many "sons"; the result of God's creation of those who bear His image and likeness. Jesus illustrates this in John 10:34, Jesus answered them, Is it not written in your law, I said, Ye are gods? 35 If he called them gods, unto whom the word of God came, and the scripture ...


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The question is to two words. This answer addresses only (et). As noted in the first answer that (et) is the untranslatable mark of the accusative case. Strong’s Concordance says it is apparently a contraction of (#226) in the demonstrative sense of entity; properly self (but generally used to point out more definitely the object of a verb or preposition, ...


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R. N. Whybray says in 'The social world of the wisdom writers', published in The World of Ancient Israel (edited by R. E. Clements), page 242, that Ecclesiastes is one of the latest, if nor the latest, of the books of the Old Testament, as indicated above all by the language in which it is written, which, though unique in various ways, has close affinities ...


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If the focus is on a blessing which comes from the LORD, what is done in creation should serve as a starting point on which to build understanding: And G-d blessed them, saying: 'Be fruitful, and multiply, and fill the waters in the seas, and let fowl multiply in the earth'. (Genesis 1:22 JPS) It is possible G-d was kneeling but the ones receiving the ...


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Dan 12,12: לְיָמִ֕ים אֶ֕לֶף שְׁלֹ֥שׁ מֵאֹ֖ות שְׁלֹשִׁ֥ים וַחֲמִשָּֽׁה׃ Literally: to days thousand three hundreds thirty and five The KJV has “five and thirty” instead of “thirty and five” because this was the more common way to express compound numbers in 17th-century English. None of this has anything to do with lunar or solar calendars.


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A general principle for interpretation of Scripture is that Scripture interprets Scripture. If this initial word is tracked throughout it is seen to mean firstfruits, first, or chief. So a translation that renders this "In the beginning period..." however grammatically correct fails to convey the essential meaning of the word as it implies what is described ...


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We have to lay out the root of the passage, as well as the basis of the meaning of the words [אין] and [בלי], as consistently used throughout the Hebrew of the Masoret. [אין] is quite different from [לא]. Whereas [לא] = no, do not [אין] = is not, not-being [בלי] = not-having, translated as "without". The root of the passage is Jewish enumeration ...


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Many passages of scripture use it in a non-eternal sense. Deuteronomy 23:3 "An Ammonite or a Moabite shall not enter the assembly of Yahweh ; even to the tenth generation none of his descendants shall enter the assembly of Yahweh olam." Joshua 4:7 Jeremiah 18:15-16 Joshua 24:2 Deut. 32:7 1 Samuel 1:20


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The Tanakh Translation from JPS (2004) reads: There is no utterance, there are not words, whose sound goes unheard. (19:4) The study notes state: "The cosmos praises God; the creation testifies to God's greatness. It is unclear if the sound is metaphorical, or if some Israelites believed in the music of the spheres, an idea later associated with ...


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OP's source that describes these particles as "unknown word(s)" is highly misleading. אֶת־ = ʾet is a Hebrew particle used to mark the definite direct object of a transitive verb; וְאֵ֥ת = wəʾet is the conjunction waw "and" (a.k.a. vav) followed by אֶת. Their usage in Genesis 1:1 is typical of the thousands of ocurrences found in the Hebrew Bible. ...


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It keeps me annoyed why Bible translators are too motivated to provide their interpretation rather than giving a faithful translation. שש הנה These six שנא יי the LORD hates ושבא תועבות and seven abominations תועבת נפשו His breath/soul abhors עינים רמות lofty eyes לשון שקר tongue of falsehood וידים שפכות דם נקי and hands draining innocent blood ...


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The Masoretic Text provides clues as to how to read and understand this verse. First, the Masoretes provided a system of cantillation and accent marks, which had signaled to the listener (and reader) the Hebrew hierarchy of thought for every single verse of the Hebrew Bible. For example, the following parse provides the schematic understanding of how the ...


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Disclaimer: I am not a guru on Hebrew Poetry. Parsing Psa 19:3(4) Psa 19:3(4) אֵֽין־אֹ֭מֶר וְאֵ֣ין דְּבָרִ֑ים בְּ֝לִ֗י נִשְׁמָ֥ע קוֹלָֽם׃ Psa. 19:4 אין־ Particle adverb nothing, is not אמר Noun common masculine singular speech ו Particle conjunction and אין Particle adverb ...



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