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1

A great resource to use for these kinds of endeavors is BlueLetterBible.org. Here is the entry for Beit Aven (H1007) Beth-aven = "house of vanity" and the entry for אָוֶן aven (205): From an unused root perhaps meaning properly, to pant (hence, to exert oneself, usually in vain. Outline of Biblical Usage trouble, wickedness, sorrow ...


0

Unfortunately, the confusion arises only as a result of the pre-existing theological position in the source material. The article you linked to is trying to prove that the archangel Michael is Jesus, which is why it introduces this translation error, for it to then be able to appeal to it as an argument to support its claim. As many have already pointed ...


-1

I'm not sure the answer is that complicated. Haven't we all seen the irreverent insult in which one places the tip of their thumb on their nose, extending and waving their fingers like a branch blowing in the wind? The passage serves to futher describe the mockery that has provoked God to anger. The NLT version is the better translation for this passage. ...


0

Beth El and Beth Even are place names. They may or may not have plausible etymologies, but they do not have any "meaning" other than the fact that they designate specific places. It is not correct to say that they are here used in contrast to each other. You are reading too much into the text.


2

A similar phrase occurs in Amos 4:11 where Yahveh says that Israel was "like a brand plucked from the burning" (כְּאוּד מֻצָּל מִשְּׂרֵפָה). "Burning" (שְׂרֵפָה) is evidently related to "fire" (אֵשׁ), since the former is produced by the latter (cp. Isa. 64:11). Gesenius (p. 20) wrote that the noun אוּד referred to "a wooden poker, so called from the fire ...


4

I agree in large part with both Niobius's answer and Joseph's answer, but have a particular disagreement with Joseph's that I feel must be noted, and a particular missed opportunity from Niobius's answer to help explain Gen 2:17. My Two Agreements Both answers acknowledge that in not all instances does that phrase refer to actually dying on the same day ...


1

The pun, if one is intended, is that of Gid'on (his name), and the verb gimmel-dalet-ayin, which means "breaking up". The barley loaf, as mentioned above in Eli Rosencruft's comment, ("The barley cake does not have the gluten content of wheat, so it does not stick together like wheat bread.") could break up, both itself, and break up the unity the ...


2

As to #1 - Different Quantity of Objects No reconciliation needed across the gospels, because if it is true that Christ said four things, he also said three things. There is no untruth in noting the lesser amount, just a shift in emphasis. Now as far as reconciling four things in the Greek with the three things of the Hebrew text, the Hebrew word לֵבָב ...


4

Prelims. Just for comparison, the three synoptic texts from UBS4: Mt 22:37 ὁ δὲ ἔφη αὐτῷ, Ἀγαπήσεις κύριον τὸν θεόν σου ἐν ὅλῃ τῇ καρδίᾳ σου καὶ ἐν ὅλῃ τῇ ψυχῇ σου καὶ ἐν ὅλῃ τῇ διανοίᾳ σου· Mk 12:30 καὶ ἀγαπήσεις κύριον τὸν θεόν σου ἐξ ὅλης τῆς καρδίας σου καὶ ἐξ ὅλης τῆς ψυχῆς σου καὶ ἐξ ὅλης τῆς διανοίας σου καὶ ἐξ ὅλης τῆς ἰσχύος σου. Lk 10:27 ... ...


3

The scanned manuscript itself is online at the Vatican Digital Library (Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana).


3

The כִי- (-kî) 2nd fem sg suffix (which appears also in vv. 3 and 5) is explained as simply a rare (or possibly Aramaizing) form of the suffix: see Gesenius Kautzsch Cowley, §58g (for the verb) and §91e for the noun. Basically the same explanation is given in Joüon-Muraoka, at §61i (verb), and §94i (noun). See also p. 269 of Geoffrey Khan's discussion of ...


2

The way the date is given is perfectly in keeping with how dates are cited in Biblical Hebrew: first the year (described in relation to a significant figure), then the month and day. So for example, Haggai 1:1, "In the second year of Darius the king, in the sixth month, on the first day of the month." It is clearly not the sixth month/first day of Darius' ...


1

As I am sure you know, the Hebrew word אֱלֹהִים is a plural noun and literally means “gods”, but in the Old Testament it is also the name of the God of Israel. In passages like this both meanings are (from a grammatical point of view) equally possible. In the Jewish and Christian Bible translations there is definitely a tendency to play down any potentially ...


-1

Friedrich Weinrebb also tells chamushim must literally be translated as 'with five' or 'one fifth (1/5th). he suggest that Jewish oral traditions speaks of only 1/5 of all Israel exits Egypt en 4/5 of them staying there. he suggests that 80% thaught egypt was better than the desert and a unknown future. this 1/5th is also the ratio which Joseph applies to ...


2

בִּשְׁנַת שֵׁשׁ־מֵאֹות שָׁנָה לְחַיֵּי־נֹחַ בַּחֹדֶשׁ הַשֵּׁנִי בְּשִׁבְעָה־עָשָׂר יֹום לַחֹדֶשׁ Literally: In year 600 of the years (belonging) to the life of Noah, in month two, in (the) 17(th) day (belonging) to the month. "Year 600 of the years (belonging) to the life of Noah", means the year ending with his 600th birthday, i.e., the year when he was ...



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