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Leviticus 19:28 (Tyndale Version): Ye shall not rent youre flesh for any soules sake, nor printe any markes apon you: I am the Lorde. In Biblical terminology and definition, the word "soul," it is pertaining to living person, Genesis 2:7 in other words soul is not dead but it is animated body or an alive person...


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The entire Codex Siniaticus, over 1,600 years old and the oldest complete text of the New Testament, can be viewed in photographic detail at http://www.codexsinaiticus.org/en/ . A transliteration of the often hard-to-read letters is also available inline. This will let you see how the ancient Greek scribes originally wrote their manuscripts. It's pure text ...


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Actually and according to the Hebrew translation Rahab = Pride, so when you read the passage as it was intended, "and by His understanding He shatters pride"... this would make more sense in terms of Job talking as he is referring to himself.


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In Mt 6:13 the Syriac translation of the Bible (Pšīttā) has bīšā (ܒܝܫܐ), which is masculine gender, determinate state, singular of the adjective “bad, evil”, so the most literal translation would be “the evil one”. The abstract noun “evil, badness” is bīšūṯā (ܒܝܫܘܬܐ), or you can use the feminine determinate singular of the adjective, namely bīštā (ܒܝܫܬܐ) ...


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The Idea in Brief From the perspective of the Hebrew Bible, there are three apparent reasons why there is a “gap” of indefinite time between Gen 1:1 and Gen 1:2. Discussion First, the Hebrew Scriptures indicate that the Lord did not create the earth formless and void. The word for “create” (בָּרָא) in the following verse is the same word for “create” ...


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Note: Since some gap theory arguments rely on phrasing in the King James, I will be quoting from the KJV unless otherwise noted. All verses will be examined in the KJV, other versions will be listed if they correct or add to the discussion. The Gap Theory, sometimes called the Ruin and Reconstruction Theory of creation, postulates that an unspecified amount ...


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רָצַח and φονεύω are best defined as murder, but רָצַח can also apply to accidental death as well. One does not intentionally perform accidents, but accidents that lead to death should be avoided as well. With their overlap being on murder, it is most likely that the command means not to intentionally and maliciously kill someone. Primarily this was ...


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Taken from Keil and Delitzsch's Commentary: The Kethib התעתים has been incorrectly written for התעיים, the Hiphil from תּעה, to err; here, as in Proverbs 10:17, it means to make a mistake. בּנפשׁותיכם, not, "you mislead your own selves," decepistis animas vestras (Vulg.), nor "in your souls," - meaning, in your thoughts and intentions ...


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This answer complements (and, to an extent, challenges) the existing answer (although the commentary offered on the passages is certainly insightful). The distribution of the two patterns shows a marked preference for the negation being "attached" to the finite form:1 30× (in 28 vss) - Exod. 5:23; 8:24; 34:7; Lev. 7:24; 19:20; Num. 14:18; 23:25; Deut. ...


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The Idea in Brief A survey of the uses of the infinitive absolute in tandem with the negative adverb לֹא in the Hebrew Bible provides new perspective. In this regard, there are six passages where the adverb לֹא negates the infinitive absolute and/or negates the main verb depending on context. These examples therefore help to understand the correct meaning ...


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While I partially agree with Davïd's analysis, I think it misses the point and context. Let's start with some fundamentals. First, lets consider the Jewish theory that while in the Garden of Eden, Adam and Eve could not die. Second, let's also consider that while in the Garden of Eden, Adam and Eve did not have complete free will in the sense that they ...


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Even if this "surely" in Genesis 2:16 were meant to imply predestination (which does not seem likely), it does not refer to eating from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, but to eating from all the other allowed trees. 16 And the Lord God commanded the man, saying, “You may surely eat of every tree of the garden, So this verse is not about ...


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I do not pretend to know the minds of the ESV revisers. But there is some justification for their rendering of Genesis 2:16, although exploring the (possible) reasoning cannot be done briefly. Here we go... Genesis 2:16-17 We need the text, and in this case it is imperative to work from the Hebrew, with the immediate context also in view (I'll stick with ...


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New to this thread, but just a thought-looking at some commentary in a study Bible I purchased, and it translates it as, "in the world of human experience." The Biblical scholar (Dr. Scott Hahn) that provides the commentary and notes understands original Biblical languages, and has untangled many an odd verse for me.


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Is there any potential reference to the seed and the sower here? That is the first passage I thought of, which is a bit different than the other two mentioned. Meaning, Samuel did not any of the Lord's words fall to the ground, that is to say they all were in the good soil of Samuel's heart, and not fallen by the wayside as the seed that falls along the ...



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