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The Idea in Brief The plural form (maḥămaddîm) is not literary, but is to be understood in the literal sense. That is, Jewish sages over the centuries did not understand the plural form here in any literary (or abstract) sense, but in the most literal way. In this regard, the plural suffix was in reference to sweet words (plural) that emanate from the ...


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The plural noun in classical Hebrew can do other "non-number" jobs than simply the plural of "majesty". One common one is the "plural of abstraction", and that is the way maḥămaddîm is typically understood here. Waltke-O'Connor para. 7.4.2(a) further refine this as refering to qualities: Cf. Joüon-Muraoka, who explain it precisely the same way: a "plural ...


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The suffix 'im' is very common in this passage and throughout Song of Songs, as there are a lot of plurals present throughout. 'His mouth is most sweet' is also conjugated in the plural here, as are many other words throughout this section of Song of Solomon. In each case, the plural isn't about majesty but rather intensity - it helps the text to flow ...


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We do not actually have the original Hebrew to judge the NLT by. What we have is essentially a transliteration into a later form of Hebrew that was compiled in the Middle Ages. I think others have addressed the question of whether the Masoretic Hebrew (not the original Hebrew) is correctly represented, and defer to the Masoretes to have transliterated ...


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The phrase “because no” (על לא) does not appear to have any particular vowel pointing nuance or exceptions of spelling in Hebrew Scripture, however the Masoretic scholars noted that the phrase “because no” occurs three times in the Masoretic Text. (Please see the middle column on Masoretic note on Page 486 of the Codex Leningradis online.) Notwithstanding ...


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The Hebrew phrase לֹא חָמָס עָשָׂה (loʾ chāmās ʿāsāh) could possibly suggest that the individual did not commit a crime (i.e., act of violence) that warranted being imprisoned and sentenced to death (e.g., committing murder),1 without necessarily suggesting that he was a righteous or innocent man. However, the prophet Isaiah also describes this individual as ...


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I feel like the writer is referring to a body of water literally under the earth as in space, I don't know why but I feel confident that this is what he means.


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You are right in saying both Hebrew and Greek words just mean "messenger". The English word "angel" is transliterated from αγγελος. All passages containing "messenger" make most sense when looking see what the actual "message" is that is being brought by the "messenger". The message is more important that the one who brings it. Related Strongs Numbers ...


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While animal identification in these ancient texts is often difficult to make with any certainty whatsoever I think it is possible to show significant evidence that: the Song reference is to a bird the bird is NOT a dove The reason I say that is this verse: ESV Gen 15:9 He said to him, "Bring me a heifer three years old, a female goat three ...


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I see it has been a while since this subject was discussed. I believe the argument can be made that by the use of the original word, it would be possible that it actually means, "turtle". We try to explain it away with using the word "turtle dove" which of course makes sense. The explanation has also been made that "turtle" would be synonymous with our ...


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in my understanding, the "water" was created in the beginning together with heaven and earth(heaven, earth includincluding water). Because, After this verse we did not read any verse that God said " let there be a water" or that said "God created water"


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The Idea in Brief The BHS emendation is not justified. In this regard, the Masoretic Text contains helpful hints in understanding ambiguous words. That is, the Masoretic Text correlates the verb in Gen 8:10 and Gen 8:12, but with a different verb. Based on these Masoretic tips (discussed in the next section), the best reading of this verse would appear as ...


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God made Adam male and female, as attested twice, so Eve is not the first woman but something else female that helps them. I suggest that Eve is the paraclete that Jesus aims to replace -- as a "new" or "another" paraclete John (14:15-27). What other helper or comforter might Jesus have been refering to, other than Eve? The etympological origin of Paraclete ...


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The Septuagint identifies the remnant of Edom as the "remnant of men", which, in context, appears to be the remnant of Israel: "In that day I will raise up the tabernacle of David that is fallen, and will rebuild the ruins of it, and will set up the parts thereof that have been broken down, and will build it up as in the ancient days: that the remnant of ...


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I would point out that the Hebrew text lends itself to the translation "rib." The text in Genesis 2:21 literally reads, "And he [the Lord God] took one ['aḥat] from his side [miṭṭela'] and he closed the flesh after them [taḥtennah]." The "one" would suggest a part of the side, and the "after them" (with a feminine plural suffix) would suggest that the one ...


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The Sumerians were a non-Semitic, non-Indo-European people who lived in southern Babylonia from 4000-3000 B.C.E. They invented cuneiform writing, and their spiritual beliefs influenced all successive Near Eastern religions, including Judaism, Christianity and Islam. They produced an extensive body of literature, among the oldest in the world. Historically, ...



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