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1

I think that the term "Red Sea" is a mis-translation of the term "Reed Sea". This was a small body of water that was north of the usually proposed route that Moses took. It no longer exists as a result of the creation of the Suez Canal. It was a shallow boggy area. It does not strain ones credulity nearly as much to imagine the events of the crossing as ...


-1

Disclaimer: There is no "Right" answer to this question--but some answers can be more plausible than others. An Objection to the first Proposed Answer, by David: I disagree with David, that "Light" was explicitly written side-by-side with the expressions, "good," and "it was so*," because only light was created on the first day, or because "It" could ...


3

There have been a couple of recent treatments of the Trisagion -- at least, these are ones I'm aware of. In 2008 H.G.M. Williamson's "Wellhausen Lecture" was published as Holy, Holy, Holy: The Story of a Liturgical Formula (Walter de Gruyter, 2008).1 He looks at the history of the verse in terms spelled out by the title, but probing back into biblical times ...


1

Judaism has a tendency to do things in three times (actually all Semitic cultures). Something done/said/ruled thrice is considered permanent. This is called a “instillation/strengthening" (depends on the context) or in Hebrew Khazaqah. It's not the only occurrence either: Ezekial 21:27 "A ruin, ruin, ruin I will make it. This also shall not be, until ...


-1

Is there anything else intrinsic to these passages or their context that would cause the writers to choose this form. Is there anything that ties these occurrences together? Intrinsic - belonging naturally; deep-rooted, deep-seated, existing in something as a permanent, essential, or characteristic attribute. In the Hebraic mindset a name is honor, ...


0

Very possible that "תחש" (tachash) was a colloquialism or long forgotten figure of speech used to refer to any durable leather. Much evidence that the ancient near eastern peoples in proximity to the Red Sea, Egypt and the Sinai had a rich history of making leather out of numerous animal hides both marine and terrestrial. Not sure why the The New King James ...


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As the Ark was sealed to keep all the birds in we have to assume that the 'window' was more of a ventilation slot along the roof? Noah had to open soemthing to let he raven and then the doves fly out to investigate.


5

Kennedy summarizes his view on p. 5, and OP's sense that the paseq is a rough equivalent to how we use [sic] strikes me as about right. Kennedy's view, however, doesn't seem like a plausible -- or at least certainly not a sufficient -- explanation of this masoretic notation. On the one hand, there are just too many instances in which no such "warning" is ...


1

Chapter 54 is considered by many scholars to be part of the work (Isaiah chapters 44-55) of an anonymous scribe, now known as Second Isaiah, or Deutero-Isaiah, writing during the Babylonian Exile. Second Isaiah (and, later, Third Isaiah) probably wrote a separate book, which was only added some time later to the Book of Isaiah, which was of course written ...


1

The prophets frequently compare the relationship of God and Israel as one similar to husband and wife. Song of Songs' erotic imagry embraces the mutual love of the two. Hosea, taking lessons from his own life story, sees Israel as the wayward wife who God is willing to accept back should she repent her sins. Isaiah uses similar imagry asking at 50:1 ...


11

Interesting question! I'm not sure it admits of a definitive answer, but some observations suggest one possibility. As noted by OP, the typical divine response to each day's acts of creation tends to be "impersonal": וַיַּרְא אֱלֹהִים כִּי־טוֹב wayyarʾ ĕlōhîm kî-ṭôb and God saw that [it was] good This is the response in Gen 1:10, 12, 18, 21, and ...


1

Reasonable (and legal) Let me offer a quick answer, since at present I don't have time for a more detailed one. However, I do believe it is a rather complete answer to your main question about the "reasonableness" of statement, while giving some solutions to the other two questions as well. The key is looking at the previous context, not just the statement ...


0

'The messiah' actually referrer to the Word from heaven, (John 6:25-35 and Mat1:18-24) called 'Harum mila' in ancient Hebrew. The Yorubas of Nigeria in their traditional religion of Ifa (Ephod by Septuagint and Ifa or Afa in Hebrew) called the name Orunmila (Hor'mila/Harum mila).


4

Of course, אֱלֹהִים ʾĕlōhîm has a much broader semantic range than YHWH, as implied by the way the question is framed. They are by no means synonymous. The entry in Brown-Driver-Briggs lists a number of references where ʾĕlōhîm is used of one who stands in God's place (as HALOT also has it): Some references are regularly cited together here, especially ...


3

The Idea in Brief The Paseq serves various purposes in the Hebrew Bible. In the first chapter of Genesis, the purpose of the Paseq served as the logical dichotomy between the divine name and what followed. That is, the Paseq occurs in verse 5 and also in verse 10, but was not necessary on the basis of the Masoretic accent principles. Its function was to ...


5

The "Passover offering" (פֶּסַח) of Deu. 16:2 is commonly understood in Jewish commentaries as the Passover chagiga (חגיגה) offering rather than the unique Passover offering that occurred on the evening of Nisan 14.(1) Notice the differences. In Exo. 12:3, the Israelites were commanded to take a שֶׂה for the Passover offering. A שֶׂה is a flock animal, ...


5

Exodus 12:8-9 mandates that the passover sacrifice be roasted with fire (צְלִי־אֵ֔שׁ), and prohibits its consumption when raw or when boiled in water (נָ֔א וּבָשֵׁ֥ל מְבֻשָּׁ֖ל בַּמָּ֑יִם). In contrast, Deuteronomy 16:7 uses the same verb (בֹשׁל) to describe the mandated preparation method. The definitions given in HALOT for בֹשׁל (also בָּשֵׁל) for each ...


5

Exodus 12:9 and Deut 16:7 appear in contradiction, because the former indicates there shall not be any boiling of the Passover (but only the roasting), and the latter passage states the opposite, which is the boiling (since the Hebrew verb בָּשַׁל means to boil, or to cook). In the Pentateuch, the Hebrew verb בָּשַׁל in the Piel stem also occurs in the ...


4

Translation of Hebrew Text The Hebrew text of Jer. 31:31-34 (Jer. 31:30-33 Masoretic) states, לא הִנֵּה יָמִים בָּאִים נְאֻם יַהְוֶה וְכָרַתִּי אֶת בֵּית יִשְׂרָאֵל וְאֶת בֵּית יְהוּדָה בְּרִית חֲדָשָׁה לב לֹא כַבְּרִית אֲשֶׁר כָּרַתִּי אֶת אֲבוֹתָם בְּיוֹם הֶחֱזִיקִי בְיָדָם לְהוֹצִיאָם מֵאֶרֶץ מִצְרָיִם אֲשֶׁר הֵמָּה הֵפֵרוּ אֶת בְּרִיתִי וְאָנֹכִי ...


2

Clearly this question is expansive, so forgive me if I do not give direct support or citation for everything. Rather I want to put forward the basic idea of an interpretation and would love to continue in conversation. Question 1. What is this new covenant that is forged with Jews/Israel but not with non-Jews/non-Israel? It is actually quite ...


0

Here is Rashi's analysis: "By one who withholds kindness from his friend and who abandons the fear of the Almighty?" By one who withholds kindness from his friend: Heb. למס, by one who withholds kindness. The “lammed” is a prefix, as in (Num. 26:54), “to the numerous one (לָרַב) ”; “to the one who returns (?) (לָשָב) ,” and (Isa. 28:10, 13) “for a precept ...


5

First, let me put into context that "new covenant" as used in Jeremiah does not mean a covenant that replaces an "old covenant." When we speak of "the Covenant" we are usually talking about the one between the Jewish people and God made at Mt. Sinai. But that covenant was not the first, nor the last covenant between G-d and the Jewish people. See, e.g. ...


6

Verse 33 explains what’s going on: ולא ילמדו עוד איש את־רעהו ואיש את־אחיו לאמר דעו את־ה׳; כי־כולם ידעו אותי למקטנם ועד־גדולם נאם-ה׳ כי אסלח לעונם ולחטאתם לא אזכר־עוד׃ and they shall teach no more every man his neighbor, and every man his brother, saying: ‘Know the LORD’; for they shall all know Me, from the least of them unto the greatest of them, ...


2

The Idea in Brief The New Covenant is extended to all nations of the world, because those people who accept this New Covenant are fused (or baptized) into the mystical Body of the Christ. That is, his blood of Jesus Christ is the New Covenant (Luke 22:20). In this respect, then, the New Covenant is not an extension of the Old Covenant but of both the ...


1

• What is this new covenant that is forged with Jews/Israel but not with non-Jews/non-Israel? The covenant with Jeremiah is an expansion of the covenant with Abraham. With Abraham, God’s covenant has three aspects to it to be expanded by the latter covenants: Land: Expanded By Mosaic Covenant {Ex. 19 - Lev. 27; Deut.} Seed: Expanded by Davidic Covenant ...



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