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8

OP's source that describes these particles as "unknown word(s)" is highly misleading. אֶת־ = ʾet is a Hebrew particle used to mark the definite direct object of a transitive verb; וְאֵ֥ת = wəʾet is the conjunction waw "and" (a.k.a. vav) followed by אֶת. Their usage in Genesis 1:1 is typical of the thousands of ocurrences found in the Hebrew Bible. ...


7

Dan 12,12: לְיָמִ֕ים אֶ֕לֶף שְׁלֹ֥שׁ מֵאֹ֖ות שְׁלֹשִׁ֥ים וַחֲמִשָּֽׁה׃ Literally: to days thousand three hundreds thirty and five The KJV has “five and thirty” instead of “thirty and five” because this was the more common way to express compound numbers in 17th-century English. None of this has anything to do with lunar or solar calendars.


4

The Masoretic Text provides clues as to how to read and understand this verse. First, the Masoretes provided a system of cantillation and accent marks, which had signaled to the listener (and reader) the Hebrew hierarchy of thought for every single verse of the Hebrew Bible. For example, the following parse provides the schematic understanding of how the ...


3

The very short answer is: "no". For the Greek Septuagint see NETS; for the Aramaic Targumim see the Aramaic Bible series; for the Hebrew Masoretic Text, any reliable public translation will do. These textual traditions are sufficiently distinct that it would not make sense to have an amalgamated edition (which is what I take it is meant by "all combined ...


2

OP has already done a fine job in identifying the problem, and setting out solutions. The majority of modern commentators take ...ʾādām here as a reference to a place name, "Adam" (as in Joshua 3:16, as noted by OP). The notion that the following šām "there" requires a place-name as antecedent, and that the only viable candidate is ...ʾādām, is widely found ...


2

Disclaimer: I am not a guru on Hebrew Poetry. Parsing Psa 19:3(4) Psa 19:3(4) אֵֽין־אֹ֭מֶר וְאֵ֣ין דְּבָרִ֑ים בְּ֝לִ֗י נִשְׁמָ֥ע קוֹלָֽם׃ Psa. 19:4 אין־ Particle adverb nothing, is not אמר Noun common masculine singular speech ו Particle conjunction and אין Particle adverb ...


1

R. N. Whybray says in 'The social world of the wisdom writers', published in The World of Ancient Israel (edited by R. E. Clements), page 242, that Ecclesiastes is one of the latest, if nor the latest, of the books of the Old Testament, as indicated above all by the language in which it is written, which, though unique in various ways, has close affinities ...


1

No, traditional English translations render שֵׁם־יְהוָה correctly as a phrase: e.g. “Look! The name of Yahweh comes from afar ...” (LEB). Though name and YHWH are linked in the Masoretic text by a maqqef or 'Hebrew hyphen', this indicates to speakers that the second word is accented, not the first. It’s a function of pronunciation, not meaning. The ...


1

The Idea in Brief The Masoretic Text and Babylonian Talmud provide compelling insights. First, the Masoretic Text provides structure through the cantillation marks and accents to help understand how the words related one to another. In this respect, the cantillation and accent marks provide no direct relationship between the word אָדָם (Adam) and the word ...



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