Hot answers tagged

9

History The Hebrew and Greek terms for 'messenger' do have this natural overlap, and can cause contention in translation. The Latin Vulgate was the first translation which tried to separate the word into divine and human, by transliterating the Greek term αγγελος to create the Latin angelus for divine messengers, and 'translating' it properly for human ...


6

No, Vawter is not correct. The Hebrew does likely have two absolute Hebrew word forms next to one another in the construction of הָאֵל֙ בֵּֽית־אֵ֔ל ("the God Bethel"), which can mean an appositional relation ("the God, i.e., Bethel), whereas strictly speaking, "God of Bethel" would have God in a construct form. But Vawter and other such solutions posing ...


4

Although the Hebrew article is frequently used in a manner that is similar to the English definite article, there are certain contexts where this parallel breaks down. One such case when the Hebrew definite may correspond to an English indefinite is summarized by Waltke and O'Connor:1 The article may also mark nouns definite in the imagination, ...


4

So the question is "Vawter correct?" is perhaps difficult because all I do not have his book and can neither verify Geir's attribution to him, nor determine what context it is in. But as I see it this question can be answered in parts1) What does the Masoretic Text say. 2) What do the Septuagint say. 3) Are there text critical issues 4) What impact does this ...


3

A Range of Possibilities There is certainly some versatile grammar here for the phrase in question: כִּ֧י אִם־פָּנָ֣יו אֶשָּׂ֗א לְבִלְתִּ֞י עֲשׂ֤וֹת עִמָּכֶם֙ נְבָלָ֔ה And while you state... I am primarily not concerned with the semantic range of the word נְבָלָ֔ה, or the potential implications of God doing נְבָלָ֔ה, although these issues ...


3

I like your question (and I am very curious about it too), but I'm not sure if there can ever be a definitive answer. There doesn't appear to be enough information to say for sure. I find it equally interesting that, not only were they named, but the subsequent verse describes their beauty, and the inordinate value that Job placed upon them (elevating them ...


3

The Secularization (and Yahwist Rebranding) of the House of El The purpose of translation is to render into English the intended meaning of the biblical writers. While the ancient etymology of Hebrew words is sometimes interesting, it isn’t always helpful to this task. For example, though Gen.28 tells a story of Jacob’s naming of Bethel, the toponym ...


2

No, they are not synonymous. In way of background, we note that the Hebrew rûaḥ is commonly rendered by the Greek pneuma, both commonly rendered by the English spirit. The OP is wondering why, in Isaiah 40:13, the translator has chosen the Greek nous ("mind") rather than the more common pneuma ("spirit"). Despite the default translations rûaḥ ↔ ...


1

In ancient Hebrew thought man is composed of two physical elements: dirt breath The making of man into these two elements is graphically described by Moses: Gen 2:7 then the LORD God formed the man of dust from the ground and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, and the man became a living creature. In other words, YHVH scooped up ...


1

The Hebrew text of Gen. 31:13 states, יג אָנֹכִי הָאֵל בֵּית אֵל אֲשֶׁר מָשַׁחְתָּ שָּׁם מַצֵּבָה אֲשֶׁר נָדַרְתָּ לִּי שָׁם נֶדֶר עַתָּה קוּם צֵא מִן הָאָרֶץ הַזֹּאת וְשׁוּב אֶל אֶרֶץ מוֹלַדְתֶּךָ The phrase in question is הָאֵל בֵּית אֵל. As the original question mentioned, most English translations translate this phrase into English as "the God of ...


1

Was the LXX used in Palestine in the First Century? Yes. The Septuagint was used in Palestine in the 1st century. "The Jews made use of it [i.e the LXX] long before the Christian Era, and in the time of Christ it was recognised as a legitimate text, and was employed in Palestine even by the rabbis." (New Advent Catholic Encyclopedia).


1

צֹ֣הַר [tso-har] roof, noon, midday LXX: "thou shalt narrow" KJV: "a window shalt thou make" Επισυναγων [e-pi-su-NA-gone] depicts two flat planes coming together. You can consider this to be a pitched roof over the ark, or the side panels narrowing to a pointed bow/stern. I have always wondered why pictures of Noah's ark had pointed bow and stern. This ...


1

Look, El Sha and ddai (I'm jewish I can't put the holy name down here in one word) is actually a hebrew acronym for Shin(ש) Shomer ‎Dalet(ד) Delasot Yod(י)‎ Yisrael which means protector/keeper guardian of Israel (The Jews). In all Shin, Dalet and Yod(hebrew letters) make up the hebrew word Sha and ddai.This name is a very holy sacred name of God in ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible