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7

This is not the "same word" repeated and used in different ways. These are homonyms, i.e., two different words: the first אֶת־ is the sign of the definite direct object (= I. אֵת at link -- as discussed in relation to Genesis 1), which is untranslatable -- there is no English equivalent. When suffixes are added to it, it has the form ʾōt- or ʾôt-. the ...


5

Interestingly, despite there being several good answers here, no one has yet raised the possibility that the word ראם (re'em) refers to an animal known as the aurochs or urus (Bos primigenius). (Edit: Bruce James' answer does say "the ראם is a type of cow", which would be consistent with the aurochs conclusion.) Around the turn of the twentieth century ...


3

The Hebrews reads הָֽאָדָ֖ם note the article הָֽ ('the') before אָדָם ('man', 'mankind', 'Adam'). Going back to Gen 1:27 we read: So God created man ( אֶת־הָֽאָדָם֙ )in His own image; in the image of God He created him; male and female He created them. ( NKJ) Notice that it is exactly the same term "the man" in both cases (though this is obscured ...


2

ותצחק שרה and laughing Sarah בקרבה within herself לאמר to say אחרי בלתי after I am without/lack היתה לי her-exist/become of me עדנה her-make-pleasure ואדני זקן and my lord-husband is bearded/old You should simply read the passage at its face value. Sarah laughing within herself to say, after I lack/lose my liveliness, have pleasure and my ...


1

"Ruah" literally means "wind," but can be used to mean "spirit" in some contexts. The phrasing: "hinnabe el..." is used throughout the book of Ezekiel to mean "prophesy about..." or "prophesy to...." Unlike any other prophet, Ezekiel likes to prophesy about inanimate and physical things. Here are the instances: 6:1 - prophesy about the mountains of Israel ...


1

My Hebrew isn't great but as far as I can tell וַתֵּ֣לֶד is translated as 'bare' in The JKV not אֶת־ which is untranslated in our English versions as it is functioning as a direct object marker, its purpose is therefore to indicate that the following nominal is the direct object of the clause אֶת־קַ֔יִן (Cain) Later on the verse the same word (אֵת) is ...


1

The word ראם (re'em) likely refers to a specific animal known as the aurochs or urus (Bos primigenius) which is now extinct. The Akkadian cognate rimu, which is known to refer to this animal based on archaeological finds, supports this theory. The aurochs is a "grand wild ox", so translators using "wild ox" are following this theory, using a relatable ...



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