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5

No, Vawter is not correct. The Hebrew does likely have two absolute Hebrew word forms next to one another in the construction of הָאֵל֙ בֵּֽית־אֵ֔ל ("the God Bethel"), which can mean an appositional relation ("the God, i.e., Bethel), whereas strictly speaking, "God of Bethel" would have God in a construct form. But Vawter and other such solutions posing ...


4

The conjunction waw can mean "or" in some cases. Here's Joüon-Muraoka (formatting mine): The idea represented by the Engl[ish] or is usually expressed by אוֹ... But instead of this precise word, a Waw often suffices, e.g. [2 Sam 2:19:] לא־נָטָה לָלֶ֫כֶת עַל־הַיָּמִין וְעַל־הַשְּׂמֹאל he did not turn aside right or (nor) left, ...


3

So the question is "Vawter correct?" is perhaps difficult because all I do not have his book and can neither verify Geir's attribution to him, nor determine what context it is in. But as I see it this question can be answered in parts1) What does the Masoretic Text say. 2) What do the Septuagint say. 3) Are there text critical issues 4) What impact does this ...


3

A Range of Possibilities There is certainly some versatile grammar here for the phrase in question: כִּ֧י אִם־פָּנָ֣יו אֶשָּׂ֗א לְבִלְתִּ֞י עֲשׂ֤וֹת עִמָּכֶם֙ נְבָלָ֔ה And while you state... I am primarily not concerned with the semantic range of the word נְבָלָ֔ה, or the potential implications of God doing נְבָלָ֔ה, although these issues ...


2

The Hebrew Phrase נִשְׁמַת חַיִּים In Gen. 2:7, it is written, And Yahveh God formed the man from the dust of the earth, and He blew into his nostrils the (נִשְׁמַת חַיִּים), and the man became a living soul. וַיִּיצֶר יַהְוֶה אֱלֹהִים אֶת הָאָדָם עָפָר מִן הָאֲדָמָה וַיִּפַּח בְּאַפָּיו נִשְׁמַת חַיִּים וַיְהִי הָאָדָם לְנֶפֶשׁ חַיָּה Whatever ...


2

"Doe of the Dawn" appears to be an accurate translation. אַיָּלָה (ʾayyālāh) means "doe". (Morphologically, it is the feminine of אַיָּל, meaning "deer.") The word in question, אַיֶּ֥לֶת (ʾayyelet), is the construct form: "doe of...". The following word שַׁ֫חַר (šaḥar) is a common word for "dawn." It is prefixed with the definite article making the whole ...


1

The Hebrew text of Gen. 31:13 states, יג אָנֹכִי הָאֵל בֵּית אֵל אֲשֶׁר מָשַׁחְתָּ שָּׁם מַצֵּבָה אֲשֶׁר נָדַרְתָּ לִּי שָׁם נֶדֶר עַתָּה קוּם צֵא מִן הָאָרֶץ הַזֹּאת וְשׁוּב אֶל אֶרֶץ מוֹלַדְתֶּךָ The phrase in question is הָאֵל בֵּית אֵל. As the original question mentioned, most English translations translate this phrase into English as "the God of ...



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