Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

Yes, there is at least one Hebrew rendition of the LXX that is aimed at reconstructing its vorlage (i.e. the text from which it was translated, in this case unpointed Biblical Hebrew). The Parallel Aligned Hebrew-Aramaic and Greek text was created as part of the CATSS (Computer Assisted Tools for Septuagint Study) project under the direction of Emmanuel Tov ...


3

The verse begins by referring to "אֶפְרֹחִים אֹו בֵיצִים" ("chicks or eggs"). It then refers to "בָּנִים", which, while translated as "young", literally means "sons", and here means "children". Since both the chicks and the eggs are the children of the mother, the terms "אֶפְרֹחִים אֹו בֵיצִים" and "בָּנִים" are equivalent, and one may eat both the chicks ...


2

tl;dr There is no basis for "bride" in the original Hebrew. The Hebrew text of Exodus 11:1b is: כְּשַׁ֨לְּח֔וֹ כָּלָ֕ה גָּרֵ֛שׁ יְגָרֵ֥שׁ אֶתְכֶ֖ם מִזֶּֽה׃ (Westminster Leningrad Codex) The word which is translated by REB as "bride" is the word "כָּלָה". The word "כָּלָה" (vocalized here with a qamatz below the kaph and no dagesh in the lamedh) means ...


2

tl;dr The Hebrew is also ambiguous. In the Hebrew: ‏ (16) וְֽהוֹשִׁיעָ֞ם יְהוָ֧ה אֱלֹהֵיהֶ֛ם בַּיּ֥וֹם הַה֖וּא כְּצֹ֣אן עַמּ֑וֹ כִּ֚י אַבְנֵי־נֵ֔זֶר מִֽתְנוֹסְס֖וֹת עַל־אַדְמָתֽוֹ׃ (17) כִּ֥י מַה־טּוּב֖וֹ וּמַה־יָפְי֑וֹ דָּגָן֙ בַּֽחוּרִ֔ים וְתִיר֖וֹשׁ יְנוֹבֵ֥ב בְּתֻלֽוֹת׃ ‎ (Westminster Leningrad Codex) The words translated "How wonderful ...


2

As OP notes, the names "Oholah" and "Oholibah" in Ezekiel 23:4 are identified as the capitals of the Northern Kingdom of Israel (Samaria) and the Southern Kingdom of Judah (Jerusalem) respectively. Typically commentators associate these obviously symbolic names with the Hebrew ʾōhel "tent". The Hebrew Names Again as noted by OP, these names are typically ...


2

Short Answer: The Psalmist most definitely meant to convey Divine favor. A good, old-fashioned word study bears this out readily. (See below.) So, in light of your understanding of the connotations of the English words, "blessed" would definitely be the better rendering. I think the logic of other translators is simply that "blessed" is not as accessible to ...


2

My persuasion is that the Masoret (with mitigated revision due from Dead Sea Scrolls) is the only biblically authoritative text for the books Genesis to Malakhi. It is a mistake and even pointless to think about English/Latin grammatical concepts in order to accurately resolve the actual intention of the Hebrew text. To map Hebrew grammatical elements to ...


1

I suggest it is more useful to look at the context of the name changes rather than the coincidence of spelling changes. A great many of the names of people we find in the Book of Genesis have meanings quite relevant to the story of the persons concerned. As stated, Abram means 'High Father', or perhaps better, 'Exalted Father', while Abraham means 'Father of ...


1

Analogy of Oholah and Oholibah There is some disagreement as to the actual significance of the meaning of the names but there is no disagreement as to the fact that they to be understood figuratively. Rashi, commenting on this passage calls them "nicknames". He further states, Samaria is the one I nickname Oholah, for from the beginning she became a ...


1

The Hebrew is "וְאָזְנֶ֙יךָ֙ תִּשְׁמַ֣עְנָה דָבָ֔ר מֵֽאַחֲרֶ֖יךָ" – "your ears will hear a thing/word from behind you". The Hebrew does not detail who is speaking in ones ear; while many traditional commentaries understand the speaker in ones ear to be God or His messengers (see Rashi, Radak), it is still possible to understand the speaker to be a trickster ...


1

The NASB reads: He made the moon for the seasons... (Psalm 104:19 NASB) Which is the better meaning of עָשָׂ֣ה. The moon was made for the לְמוֹעֲדִ֑ים or "moed," the appointed times. The meaning in the Psalm must be consistent with the account of creation: Then God said, “Let there be lights in the firmament of the heavens to divide the day from ...


1

I don't think you can distinguish too much between the two; since the Jewish calendar is a lunar calendar, all "sacred seasons" are based on the lunar cycle. That being said, in the context of this psalm. it would seem to be merely speaking of how things are ordered in the sense of time keeping. The section from verses 19 through 30 seems to be related and ...


1

There are others who support the idea that this verse has grammatical issues as Holmstedt has indicated, for example, http://www.jtsa.edu/Conservative_Judaism/JTS_Torah_Commentary/Breishit_5770.xml but Harris concludes that "in the beginning" is a reasonable interpretation and here: ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible