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This is not the "same word" repeated and used in different ways. These are homonyms, i.e., two different words: the first אֶת־ is the sign of the definite direct object (= I. אֵת at link -- as discussed in relation to Genesis 1), which is untranslatable -- there is no English equivalent. When suffixes are added to it, it has the form ʾōt- or ʾôt-. the ...


2

The Hebrews reads הָֽאָדָ֖ם note the article הָֽ ('the') before אָדָם ('man', 'mankind', 'Adam'). Going back to Gen 1:27 we read: So God created man ( אֶת־הָֽאָדָם֙ )in His own image; in the image of God He created him; male and female He created them. ( NKJ) Notice that it is exactly the same term "the man" in both cases (though this is obscured ...


1

My Hebrew isn't great but as far as I can tell וַתֵּ֣לֶד is translated as 'bare' in The JKV not אֶת־ which is untranslated in our English versions as it is functioning as a direct object marker, its purpose is therefore to indicate that the following nominal is the direct object of the clause אֶת־קַ֔יִן (Cain) Later on the verse the same word (אֵת) is ...


1

If you further read the text in 1 Samuel 2:5, AFTER Hannah leaves Samuel with Eli and when she is praising the Lord she says, "She who was barren has borne seven children, but she who has many sons pines away." Hannah is referring to herself in the first part of that sentence, so by the time she committed Samuel to the Lord as a servant of the priest (which ...



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