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Contextual and Historical Analysis Two other uses The word עִצָּבוֹן (ʿiṣṣāḇôn) itself is only found 3 times in the Hebrew Scripture, all in Genesis. Here in 3:16, then in 3:17, and finally Gen 5:29.1 The use in Gen 5:29 is actually a clarifying commentary on 3:17. The NKJV (used for all English translations herein) translates 3:17 and 5:29 as: 3:17 ...


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I believe Connection between Gideon and barley bread have many spiritual significances. 1) Jesus said I am the Bread of life (John 6:35). In the bible bread speaks of the word of God which feeds believers. 2) Jesus fed the 5000 men with barely bread and had left over (John 6). This barely bread represents message of the new covenant ,message of grace, ...


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If this event actually occurred, we are left to form an opinion as to Xerxes' likely intentions when he called for his wife. If the event is fictional, then we can look at the text to see what the author probably intended. Bruce Feiler says, in Where God Was Born, page 331, it is known from Persian records that Queen Amestris, Xerxes' only known wife, ...


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Having received no answer from the community, I reached out to Dr. Gary Rendsburg, my former mentor, who currently serves as chair of the Jewish studies department at Rutgers University. It turns out that I was heading in the wrong direction by assuming that the troublesome word is either Hebrew or Aramaic, because it appears to belong to neither language. ...


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The Idea in Brief The best reading for this verse would accept the qere as suggested by the Masoretic editors. That is, the following translation would capture the full essence of this verse: Job 13:15 15 Look, he is going to kill me: I wait for him [to strike]; in the meantime, I am going to argue [my case] before Him. Why does the ketiv or qere ...


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It is possible that Yah is not formed by the first two letters of YHWH, but by the first and last. Nehemiah Gordon proposes this theory to account for Yah, while disagreeing with the scholarly consensus regarding the pronunciation Yahweh. He states that in ancient Hebrew, contractions were commonly formed by taking the first and final letters. ...



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