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9

Short Answer: No. This is a great question, and I'm glad you asked it. This verse is often used by Christian apologists to show that the Bible was ahead of its times in its scientific claims. While this sounds convincing to modern readers of English translations, it is a very poor argument to use. Exhibit A: The word "stretch" To many, the idea of God ...


6

Two viable and not necessary mutually exclusive interpretations can be offered which result in the same theological conclusion. Sky, Space, Heaven I heard R.C. Sproul suggest that first heaven would denote the sky, second heaven deep space, and third heaven the presence of God. Ted Donnelly takes this interpretation in his book Biblical Teachings on the ...


6

"Paradise" is a transliteration of παράδεισος, a word used only three times in the New Testament. Furthermore, the context of each of the three uses is different from the others, and by three different authors. In 2 Corinthians 12:4 it appears to parallel or point to the term "third heaven" in verse 2. Since God is apparently immediately present there, ...


5

The Idea in Brief According to the Hebrew Bible, there are at least two people who have ascended into heaven: Enoch and Elijah. In the Christian New Testament, Jesus made the emphatic statement that no one (οὐδεὶς) had ever ascended into heaven with the exception of the one who had descended from heaven: that is, Jesus himself, who was to be "lifted up" ...


4

I cannot provide the exact cultural implications at the moment, but the third heaven has traditionally been taken as "into the very presence of God." This certainly was the position advocated by Aquinas as well as Augustine.


4

Jesus' statement in Luke 23:43 is not so much about the afterlife or what's required of us to get into heaven. It's primary purpose is to depict Jesus' death as undoing the curse of Adam. Luke presents Jesus as a new Adam. This is beyond a doubt the purpose in Luke's placement and arrangement of Jesus’ genealogy. Unlike Matthew who places his genealogy ...


4

Here is a good definition of gehena: Gehenna: (originally Ge bene Hinnom; i.e., "the valley of the sons of Hinnom"), a deep, narrow glen to the south of Jerusalem, where the idolatrous Jews offered their children in sacrifice to Molech (2Ch 28:3; 33:6; Jer 7:31; 19:2-6). This valley afterwards became the common receptacle for all the refuse of the ...


3

There is no problem here. Jesus is speaking to Nicodemus. Jesus knows that Nicodemus has great knowledge of the scriptures. Jesus pulls from Proverbs 30:4 to speak of the lack of understanding Nicodemus is having. 4 Who has ascended to heaven and come down? Who has gathered the wind in his fists? Who has wrapped up the waters in a garment? Who has ...


2

I think the verse you quote is similar to this, in terms of the specific question: In a similar way, Sodom and Gomorrah and the surrounding towns gave themselves up to sexual immorality and perversion. They serve as an example of those who suffer the punishment of eternal fire.(Jude 1:7) This confirms that there is a fire ever-burning. Yet this does ...


2

Apocalyptic Context Matthew seems to have condensed the parallel passage found in Mark: “Whoever causes one of these little ones who believe in me to sin, it would be better for him if a great millstone were hung around his neck and he were thrown into the sea. And if your hand causes you to sin, cut it off. It is better for you to enter life crippled ...


2

The OP presents two arguments used by some in the issue of Elijah being or not taken to heaven. @gutenburgb have already addressed the second one and I'll address the first one. The original verb for the quoted "no man hath ascended up to heaven" (KJV Joh 3.13) is ἀναβέβηκεν, which is the perfect active indicative of ἀναβαίνω, to go up, to ascend, acc. to ...


2

From my study I have come to the conclusion that Elijah wrote the "writing" before he was taken to heaven. It seems pretty clear that by "the prophet Elijah" the writer of Chronicles is not referring to a different Elijah. The Hebrew word miktab (translated "a writing") is also used in 2 Chron. 35:4 which says: And prepare yourselves by the houses of ...


2

Elijah may have been "relocated" by the Lord. This would explain several things. First, as you mentioned, the likelihood of the Elijah mentioned in 2 Chronicles, someone who would have been in the natural life span of Elijah, is significant. The writer of the Kings and Chronicles was either the same person (presumably Jeremiah), or they relied heavily on the ...


1

Rashi, here, explains that in Daniel's vision, the horns of the goat represent Persia and Media, and the stars it stomps represents Israel. God, speaking to Abraham, also compared the children of Israel to the stars. See, e.g. Gen. 15:5. See also Deut. 1:10 ("the Lord your God hath multiplied you, and behold, ye are this day as the stars of heaven for ...


1

The problem verse is not John 3:13-14. At the time this conversation was supposed to have taken place the OT saints were still supposedly waiting in sheol to be saved because Jesus had not yet died and released them. Thus, the problem verse is actually 2 K 2:11 which specifically says the whirlwind took Elijah into "heaven" (shamayim). Jesus also speaks of ...


1

Jesus is simply correcting the Sadducee's wrong assumption that the marriage ties here on earth will continue after the resurrection. God has things in store for his followers that we can't even imagine (and I don't know about you, but I can imagine quite a lot): But as it is written: “Eye has not seen, nor ear heard, nor have entered into the heart of ...



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