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5

There are only two possibilities: Jesus healed him, but the healing didn't 'take. Jesus did not heal him. 1 is improbable, so what are the reasons that Jesus wouldn't have healed him? a. They didn't cross paths. Though possible is not probable. b. They crossed paths but Jesus chose not to heal him. This occurs other places: Mt 13.58 And he did ...


3

Ah, the ESV's breaking up of the runon sentence I think makes it harder to catch the meaning. Because they disconnected "He listened to Paul speaking" from "And Paul, looking intently at him" with a period, I completely missed that all this happened while Paul was speaking. Until I went to Unbound Bible to look at the Greek, and I also read the ASV. ...


3

If one were to base their interpretation solely off the text, the narrative states (NASB): In these lay a multitude of those who were sick, blind, lame, and withered, [waiting for the moving of the waters; 4 for an angel of the Lord went down at certain seasons into the pool and stirred up the water; whoever then first, after the ...


2

Another line of thought for interpretation is in regards to Matthew 7:15 where Jesus likens people to trees which bear good or bad fruit. It seems that the blind man who began to partially see was given some insight into the condition of people. People are like trees. Good trees bear good fruit and bad trees bear bad fruit. Obviously, the blind man could ...


2

One possibility is that the first healing corrected the man's vision problem and the second corrected a problem that modern neurologists call visual agnosia. For instance, Geri Richards Hall, a Behavioral Neurology nursing expert, guides nurses giving care to geriatric patients: Patients with visual agnosia do not recognize day-to-day objects. They must ...


2

Literally, his sight had not yet fully recovered. The question is why not? When there are two things, one represents a heavenly aspect and the other an earthly aspect of the same thing. The man was healed spiritually and physically. When his eyes/understanding was 'washed in the word' (of spit/water) he was healed spiritually first. He saw men as trees, ...


1

First of all, we should look at the history of this passage. When we read the Bible, it says (KJV John 5:2-7): Now there is at Jerusalem by the sheep market a pool, which is called in the Hebrew tongue Bethesda, having five porches. In these lay a great multitude of impotent folk, of blind, halt, withered, waiting for the moving of the water. For an ...


1

As trees grow, they adapt certain forms and growth tendencies that are later difficult to change as time progresses. In the Hebrew Bible trees are therefore analogous to people: some grow, take root and bear fruit, while others do not (Judg 9:9-15; Ps 1:3; Ps 52:8; Is 56:3; Is 61:3; Jer 11:16; Jer 17:18; Dan 4:20-22). The same idea continues into the ...


1

The answer is probably very simple. A plain reading of the text leads me to conclude that he didn't see clearly enough to distinguish between people and trees after the first partial healing. That is confirmed by the statement that he saw everything "clearly" after Jesus touched his eyes the second time. I'd be careful to read any symbolism into it beyond ...



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