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The author of Hebrews is quoting Habakkuk 2:4 from the Septuagint (as opposed to the Hebrew.) In the Hebrew, this part of the verse would literally translate something like this: "Behold the scornful; his mind shall not be happy" (Stuart) (Part of the difficulty in translating Heb. 10:38 is that this is an English translation of a Greek interpretation ...


7

Deut. 32:20 and Hab 2:4 both contain the Hebrew word emun (Heb: אמון), translated in the KJV as "faith." Emun is H529 in Strong's where it's defined as "faithfulness, trusting." However, the word emun derives from the root word aman (Heb: אמן), which is a very common word in the Bible. Aman is strong's H539 where it's defined as: "to support, confirm, be ...


6

The explanation is not contradictory. First we see how Paul expands the meaning of Habakkuk 2:4 in the relevant verse here in Romans - Romans 1:17 (GNT) δικαιοσύνη γὰρ θεοῦ ἐν αὐτῷ ἀποκαλύπτεται ἐκ πίστεως εἰς πίστιν, καθὼς γέγραπται, Ὁ δὲ δίκαιος ἐκ πίστεως ζήσεται. The key in this verse is that we live "from faith to faith" (ἐκ πίστεως εἰς ...


6

Not ambiguous, but inclusive in meaning Ambiguity implies two or more possible meanings that are unclear as to which it is, or more broadly simply being unclear. I do not believe that is the situation here at all. Examining the statements Let's start with the basically undisputed OT reference Paul is using in Romans. Habakkuk 2:4 The (very literal) ...


5

Chapter two of Habakkuk is God’s answer to the prophet’s dramatic pleading with God which starts at the beginning of chapter 1: 2 How long, Lord, must I call for help, but you do not listen? Or cry out to you, “Violence!” but you do not save? 3 Why do you make me look at injustice? Why do you tolerate wrongdoing? Destruction and ...


3

"Teman" is OT for "south". In Hab 3:3 the context is description of God's awesome power. So "teman" is used here as a short form of "storms of the south", the powerful "sharav" (Heb.) or "chamsin" (Ar.) blasts of hot southern wind that the Land of Israel is known for. See Zach 9:14 and Psalms 70:26. As a general geographic location "teman" appears in Josh ...


2

This is a minor translation issue, here's the way I like it (Wikisource Habakkuk): How is a statue useful? Because it's sculptor made it a mask, and a lying teacher: because the creator trusts his own creator over him to make idols dumb. Woe to he who tells the wood, "awake!", "Arise!" to the still stone. He will teach--- "Here it is wrapped in gold and ...


2

The Hebrew Word for Silence The word here, הַ֥ס, "be silent" or "still" (has; qal: הָסָה, hasah; Strong's 2013), seems like a cognate of English "hush!" (Gesenius claims this is onomatopoeic; and though I see what he means, I find it ironic to claim such about silence.) The Presence of Yahweh in His Temple Thinking Biblical-theologically, Yahweh's ...


1

Rashi says: Your deed. In the midst of the years: 'Your original deed, that You would wreak vengeance for us upon our enemies in the midst of the years of trouble in which we are found.' revive it: 'Awaken it and restore it.' in the midst of the years: 'And in the midst of these years let it be known.' I can't imagine there to be a hidden ...


1

Not sure if this exegesis is ‘deep’. I take the connection to be this: The Prophet has been showing the madness of thinking one can make an idol out of wood and then imagine that it will speak, for it is just something made by hands. In contrast to this God is real and His habitation is in heaven, and yet He has taken abode in his temple in Israel. The ...



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