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The Aramaic word for "perfect" in Matthew 5:48 "Therefore become "perfect," just as your Father in heaven is perfect," is "gmeera." Besides meaning "perfect," gmeera also means "mature" or "inclusive" depending on the context. Looking back several verses to Matt 5:44, one finds, "But I say to you, Love your enemies, bless anyone who curses you...." So, based ...


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Partitive is Nearly Certain as the Correct Understanding K. Grayston makes an argument for the inclusive view,1 but is challenged by both K. L. McKay's brief reply,2 and P.W. van der Horst's more lengthy reply,3 both upholding a partitive view. Grayston argues the inclusive view largely upon two points. First, the inclusive is the case in the primary ...


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A full well thought out translation of Luke 6:21, one that seems as accurate as possible, is here, showing the same translation as in most, if not all Bibles ('you will laugh'). Note that 'laughter' should be γέλως, which is noticeably different to γελάσετε and so does not fit into this verse. We can go further, to look at what the original author expected ...


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The grammatical structure found in Hebrews 6:6 appears to be the impersonal use of the predicate adjective in the neuter case (nominative singular form). That is, “it is impossible..." The subject is an infinitive, general thought (Smyth §1047), or statement of general truth (Smyth §1048). In other words, this grammatical structure is a blanket statement of ...


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Ἕλληνας or Hellene = Greeks. Ἑλληνιστάς refers to Hellenist, simply someone who is Greek in language and culture but was not from Greek ancestry (i.e. American Chinese who was born and has lived his/her whole life in the US). While some of the Hellenist might be of Jewish ancestry, some were not. This is consistent with the vision received by Peter in ...


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Jewish holy days are also ‘Sabbaths’, even if they don’t fall on a Saturday. The Jewish Encyclopedia’s entry for Holy Days states: Upon the six holy days in the Jewish calendar—the first and seventh days of Passover, the first and eighth days of Sukkot (Tabernacles), the day of Shebu'ot (Weeks), and the day of Rosh ha-Shanah (New-Year)—the ...


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Used with an object in the Genitive case (as here), it means "a marker indicating that an activity or event is in some entity’s interest, for, in behalf of, for the sake of someone/something" and "a marker of the moving cause or reason, because of, for the sake of, for" (BDAG lexicon). So, for the sake of our sins and because of our sins. It parallels the ...


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Lexicons frequently define παις in three senses: in relation to descent (son, daughter), age (young, e.g. infant, boy, girl), or ‘condition’ (slave, servant). The text of Matthew 8:5-13 does not clarify whether the ill person in the centurion’s household is a son or servant, but since Roman military were not allowed to marry, and the Jewish elders thought ...


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It is correct that the centurion refers to the sick child as παις in Mt 8:6. However, you might note that in the parallel version of the same story in Luke 7:1-10 he is called δουλος. This suggests that at least in this pericope παις means δουλος. In any case, it answers your questions as to why the translators have understood it in this way.



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