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This verse used to stump me too. I have read the above answers in other places but they don't resonate. When reading Oswald Cambers today 9/1 I figured it out. Jesus (like Peter) is referring to absolute perfection (holiness). For I am the Lord your God. Consecrate yourselves therefore, and be holy, for I am holy. You shall not defile yourselves with ...


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This answer is intended as a follow-up to fdb’s answer, with which I basically agree. OP: Is it a Greek-ism? Yes. Atticism might be another appropriate word. As mentioned, the phrase of interest is ἄνδρες ἀδελφοί (andres adelphoi; men, brothers). This appears to be modeled on the typical Athenian oratorical introductory formula, andres Athenaioi ...


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ἀδελφός in the singular means “brother”, but the plural ἀδελφοί is used also for “brother(s) and sister(s)”. This usage is classical, for example in Euripides and Herodotus. By contrast, ἀνήρ, plural ἄνδρες means “man, male, husband”. The inclusive term for “men and women” is ἄνθρωποι. So when the Apostle addresses his audience as “ἄνδρες, ἀδελφοί” the ...


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What does “belly” mean in Philippians 3:19? Philippians 3:19 Whose end is destruction, whose God is their belly, and whose glory is in their shame, who mind earthly things.) belly = koilia = hollow or cavity, can be used of the womb. The usage in the Philippians verse suggests a hunger or appetite unfulfilled that drives these people to seek ...


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No, it is not. As they are used in the New Testament, πλήρης χάριτος describes one's own character and capacity to bestow favor; κεχαριτωμένος is a designation of God's attitude and actions toward the one so labeled. Κεχαριτωμένος χαῖρε, κεχαριτωμένη, ὁ κύριος μετὰ σοῦ. Greetings, O favored one, the Lord is with you!1 Κεχαριτωμένος is a perfect ...


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It refers to an act of Atonement which describes the setting “at one” of those who have been estranged and denotes the reconciliation of man to God. Sin is the cause of the estrangement, and therefore the purpose of atonement is to correct or overcome the consequences of sin. From the time of Adam to the death of Jesus Christ, true believers were instructed ...


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The ancient meaning of "genea" is oft confused with the distinctly modern word generation, in its modern meaning, which was not the same when the translations were made. In modern times, we have been taught to think of the word "generation" in a sense foreign to the concept. Generation in its pure, original sense means only a continuous generating, or ...


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κεχαριτωμένος ‘having been graced’ is a participle (verbal adjective). δικαίωσις ‘justification’ is an abstract noun. Synonyms ought at least to be the same part of speech. PS. The question changed after I wrote this.


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Both phrases express the same idea, but with different wording. πλήρης χάριτος is an adjective ("full") followed by a noun in the genitive case ("of grace"). κεχαριτωμένη is the perfect passive participle feminine of a post-classical denominal verb from the same noun χάρις, with the meaning "having grace bestowed on her". It is a nice example for the way ...


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Greek word: Κεχαριτωμένη (source) Transliteration: Kecharitomene Translation: Literally,” You, who have been graced” (You that are highly favored, KJV) English: You (Second Person Singular) Have (present tense) Been (past participle of “to be”) Graced (past participle of “to grace”). Greek: KE – perfect tense (prior event/occurrence/happening ...


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The lexical form of the word of interest in προσποιέω. It is inflected here as a third person aorist verb in the middle voice. At the linked LSJ entry section II gives usages “mostly in [the middle voice]”. Subsection 2 gives the basic meaning: take to oneself what does not belong to one, pretend to, lay claim to This resonates with the components of ...


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I think the problem with suggesting 'ἐκ μέρους' is implying a part of a specific 'body' as referenced in 1 Corinthians 12:27 is firstly that there is no such mention of any 'body' in the context of the sentence: ἐκ μέρους γὰρ γινώσκομεν καὶ ἐκ μέρους προφητεύομεν· ὅταν δὲ ἔλθῃ τὸ τέλειον, τὸ ἐκ μέρους καταργηθήσεται. It is the latter half of this ...


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At the present, the spiritual gift of knowledge and/or the supernatural communication of knowledge through foreign languages ("tongues"), has value because the gifts of intelligible oral communication by definition mitigate human ignorance. In other words, in the future we will know fully just as we are known (1 Cor 13:12). These spiritual gifts of ...


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The phrase appears to be correctly rendered in all of the above translations that you have listed. For example, Young's Literal Translation renders John 3:16 thus:"for God did so love the world, that His Son -- the only begotten -- He gave, that every one who is believing in him may not perish, but may have life age-during" That God the Father 'gave' ...


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ὁ ἐρχόμενος could merely be saying that God will continue to be in the future but if taken as "will be coming in the future then we see that graphically described in chapter 21. The traditional hope of the Christian is to "go to heaven" but the scriptural hope has always been to live with God in the promised land: Rev 21:2 And I John saw the holy city, ...


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In "On the City of God against the Pagans" (De Civitate Dei Contra Paganos), Book 21, Ch. 24, Augustine wrote, For some of the dead, indeed, the prayer of the Church or of pious individuals is heard; but it is for those who, having been regenerated in Christ, did not spend their life so wickedly that they can be judged unworthy of such compassion, nor so ...


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The Hebrew is "וְאָזְנֶ֙יךָ֙ תִּשְׁמַ֣עְנָה דָבָ֔ר מֵֽאַחֲרֶ֖יךָ" – "your ears will hear a thing/word from behind you". The Hebrew does not detail who is speaking in ones ear; while many traditional commentaries understand the speaker in ones ear to be God or His messengers (see Rashi, Radak), it is still possible to understand the speaker to be a trickster ...


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The word 'ἠγέρθη' transliterates into ēgerthē, meaning in its infinitive form 'to rise'. To understand the intended meaning of the word in a specific case we should look both at how the word is used elsewhere in the same work, using a semantic analysis, and at the immediate surrounding context of the narrative, using an informative analysis. Note also that ...


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The Greek word ἠγέρθη simply means that Jesus was 'raised' and, without context, could mean that Jesus was raised in the physical world or taken bodily up into heaven. The context we have in Mark, as originally written (to end at verse 16:9), is that Jesus' body was not there, and he was not seen again. Two chapters earlier, in verse 13:26, Mark's Jesus ...


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The Greek MSS Papyrii 66, 75, Aleph, B all omit "his." The addition of the pronoun "his" in John 3:16 is moot indeed and hence, a literal translation might be way better due to its being faithful to the Greek text: Westcott and Hort 1881 Οὕτως γὰρ ἠγάπησεν ὁ θεὸς τὸν κόσμον ὥστε τὸν υἱὸν τὸν μονογενῆ ἔδωκεν, ἵνα πᾶς ὁ πιστεύων εἰς αὐτὸν μὴ ...


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The NET bible renders it as "of his own Son" as well, and adds in note 114 at https://net.bible.org/#!bible/Acts+20:28: 114 tn Or “with his own blood”; Grk “with the blood of his own.” The genitive construction could be taken in two ways: (1) as an attributive genitive (second attributive position) meaning “his own blood”; or (2) as a possessive ...


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This is a case where you would let Scripture interpret itself. Ephesians 6: 12 informs the true Christian what the conflict is all about. If that verse is not clear enough you can defer to Matthew 25: 41, where we are told the deliberate destination of said adversaries. That is why a Christian is to leave room for God's vengeance. Romans 12: 19. The key to ...


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The wording of Rev 2:4 Revelation 2:4 Ἀλλὰ ἔχω κατὰ σοῦ (Robinson-Pierpoint MT 1995) Literally this translates as: But I have this1 against you (ESV) The wording of Rev 2:14 Revelation 2:14 Ἀλλ᾽ ἔχω κατὰ σοῦ ὀλίγα (Robinson-Pierpoint MT 1995) Literally this translates as: But I have a few things against you (Rev 2:14 ESV) The wording of Rev 2:20 ...


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I agree with Alexander that the addition of "he declared" is unwarranted. What is clearly in view is the idea that the body deals with dirt and it never gets into the "heart". Jesus was not upending the Mosaic dietary laws but rather the strict tradition of ritual hand washing for every common meal, not just in the priesthood. Jesus retains kosher vs ...


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I cannot see any. I'd also like to know why translators thought 'baffle' could be appropriate here. In a loose dynamic translation it's tempting to let it slide. But the same Greek word is used twice in that sentence the only difference being the active vs passive conjugation. ἀνακρίνει verses ἀνακρίνεται (1Co 2:15 BGT) I would translate it in the ...


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The NASB does a fine job at consistent literal translation. The word ἀνακρίνω anakrino, is translated as appraised. When one is indeed a spiritual person, who, other than God can really appraise, or judge.



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