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Paul is not defining a cult here, he simply cannot be in the larger context. It would be eisegesis for those who say he is and not exegesis, we must let the text speak. He is clearly speaking to "the church of God, which is at Corinth" (1:2) and, if a cult, then he is saying that a cult is the church, which shatters the modern notion of it. No, he is ...


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Answer: Harvard has published a Chronological list of writers that can be used in comparative analysis and Lexical Semantics This List partially Copied on 2014-11-26, From: http://www.hup.harvard.edu/features/loeb/timeline.html) Notably Missing from this List: Contemporary Hebrew and Aramaic Writers. Flavius Josephus seems to have originally ...


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IF 1 Cor 1:10-13 is actually characterizing Cults as an inappropriate devotion to individuals--then the attribution of "Cult", (σχίσματα), would certainly apply Marcion/ism--, Montanism, Donatism, etc*. Possible Answer: Since "σχίσματα," does carry with it a negative connotation, (as seen in 1 Cor 1:10), this term can be considered analogous with "Cult"; ...


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The free-download Interlinear Scripture Analyzer allows users to search clauses in the Greek New Testament in various ways. For example, please click here. We see that there are nine instances in the Textus Receptus version of the Greek New Testament, where the Greek words occur together in the phrase with some [Prep] (Preposition) + some [t_Acc] (Article ...


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I hope you realise that ancient Greek manuscripts did not usually have punctuation. The comma was added by modern translators to clarify what they took to be the correct interpretation. The original in Hebrews 10:12 reads: οὗτος δὲ μίαν ὑπὲρ ἁμαρτιῶν προσενέγκας θυσίαν εἰς τὸ διηνεκὲς ἐκάθισεν ἐν δεξιᾷ τοῦ θεοῦ. From a grammatical point of view εἰς τὸ ...


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During an opportunity to dig at a site near Jerusalem we had a lecture in the evening describing archeological dig sites in Bethlehem suggesting it was a guest house where a large family would stay while visiting that area. Many of these buildings were found in Bethlehem. The layout of these buildings drawn by the archeologist for this lecture showed a ...


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Having researched and discussed this verse in depth a few years ago for 4-5 months, I would say yes, that is exactly what the verse is saying, though many are far too quick to reach for an alternate reading. In order to properly understand this verse, a few things need to be understood... First, when we look to the lexical field (or sometimes called the ...


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Short Answer: Possible? Yes. Probable? No. The "advantages" of Synge's translation First, let's put to rest Synge's claims about the advantages of his translation. Regarding the consistently personal use of φανερόω, this verb does not have a consistently personal use (e.g. Mark 4:22) -- unless he means in this verse, which would be to commit the ...


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Short Answer: We can be fairly certain this is just saying that before Jesus could go back up to heaven, He first had to go down to the earth, which is lower. The variants There are two major textual variants in this verse listed by the UBS4, and they shed some light on what is going on here. 1) A large number of later sources added "first" so that it ...


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'The messiah' actually referrer to the Word from heaven, (John 6:25-35 and Mat1:18-24) called 'Harum mila' in ancient Hebrew. The Yorubas of Nigeria in their traditional religion of Ifa (Ephod by Septuagint and Ifa or Afa in Hebrew) called the name Orunmila (Hor'mila/Harum mila).



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