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The Romans usually only crucified insurrectionists. That is, people who had an agenda to harm their empire. "Thief" or "robber", therefore, is unfortunate language as we interpret that in our culture as someone who steals. But, Barabbas and those crucified alongside Jesus were more likely thought of by the Romans as Terrorists. What we know historically, ...


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Yes, this seems to be a common way that it was used. As another answer pointed out, the noun is not found elsewhere in the New Testament. However, Luke was familiar with (arguably, an imitator of) both LXX and Classical Greek, and there are multiple examples of ἀγωνία with this sense available there. Because context is required, I have included only English ...


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There isn't much deep meaning here beyond "with". The combination "εἰμί...πρός" appears in plenty of other places meaning simply "to be...with", especially when people are both the subject and object. A few from the NT for flavor: Mark 14:49 Every day I was with you in the temple teaching... Luke 9:41 And Jesus answered and said, “You unbelieving ...


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No. Major lexicons render the word as a struggle, contest, or competition, even exercise or a fight, but never fear or worry. If anything along those lines, it would connote bravery (sticking it out), not fear (which would seek to avoid the agonia). One would have engaged one's thumos, not their phobia, to be in agonia. Although the noun "ἀγωνία" occurs ...


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Here is the English translation of the interlinear version of 1 Peter 3:3-4 in the New American Standard: Whose let it be not the external of braiding of hair and putting around of gold or putting on of garments adorning1 But the hidden of the heart man in the imperishable [beauty] of the gentle and quiet spirit which is before God of great worth ...


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Using Logos Bible software, there appear to be 21 instances of the prepositional phrase "πρὸς [τὸν] θεόν" in the New Testament (NA28). In each instance, the idea appears to relate to the presence of God (in either an indirect or direct way depending on the context). For example, in the case of John 1:1, the λόγος would be in the direct presence of God ...


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1 Peter 3:3 ὧν ἔστω οὐχ ὁ ἔξωθεν ἐμπλοκῆς τριχῶν καὶ περιθέσεως χρυσίων ἢ ἐνδύσεως ἱματίων κόσμος (1Pe 3:3 BGT) A literal translation of the Greek would be “Let not your adornment be external—braiding the hair, and wearing gold jewelry, or putting on clothes.” Peter, however, is not forbidding the wearing of any clothes at all (as a literal reading ...


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I recently read an excellent paper on this subject "The Meaning of αὐθεντέω in 1 Timothy 2.12" (2014) by Cynthia Long Westfall. Its a long paper (36 pages), but well-worth the read, IMO. I will briefly summarize the paper here. Westfall looks at 61 of the 317 known occurrences αὐθεντέω documented in Thesaurus Linguae Graecae. (The sample was chosen ...


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8 the love never falls. but whether prophecies, they will be rendered idle; whether tongues, they will stop; whether knowledge, it will be rendered idle. 9 for we know out of part and out of part we prophesy; 10 but when the finished thing should come, the one out of part will be rendered idle. 11 when I was young, I was speaking as young, I was thinking ...


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Viktor Frankl once quoted Friedrich Nietzsche as follows - “He who has a why to live for, can bear almost any how.” I can see in these words a motto which holds true for any psychotherapy. In the Nazi concentration camps, one could have witnessed that those who knew that there was a task waiting for them to fulfill were most apt to survive. Those ...


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The best explanation is that the text is saying exactly what it appears to be saying. Vine's entry, for example, on the root αἰτέω says to ask," is to be distinguished from No. 2. Aiteo more frequently suggests the attitude of a suppliant, the petition of one who is lesser in position than he to whom the petition is made; e.g., in the case of men in ...


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Paul mentions sons of disobedience in one other epistle, namely Ephesians. And you were dead in the trespasses and sins in which you once walked, following the course of this world, following the prince of the power of the air, the spirit that is now at work in the sons of disobedience—among whom we all once lived in the passions of our flesh, carrying ...


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While the phrase "this sound" could refer to either the sound of the wind (vs. 2) or the speaking in tongues (vs. 4), several facts point to "this sound" being the speaking in tongues. The most recent antecedent for the pronoun "this" would be the believers speaking in tongues in vs. 4. 2:4 All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit, and they began ...


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First, "eternal" is in fact a direct descendent of the Greek word "αἰών" by way of the Latin "aeternus" = "aevum" + "ternus". When you say "eternal", you could also debate on historical grounds whether you are referring to a delimited or unbounded time. Greek is polysemic and "αἰών" is no exception, but in practice, the indefinite sense is quite common for ...


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When he says observe days and months and years. He was clearly speaking about mosaic law in the chapters. Because he says beggarly elements, maybe some of them worshiped tree spirits or star gods too, either way one is believing the law can save you, the other is idolatry and paganism. Both are falling back to the flesh. I know people have taken astrology ...


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Essentially in that portion you're praying that the Lord will protect you from the advances of the devil. The Holy Spirt led Jesus into the wilderness to be tempted by the evil one.


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In my opinion no. The sentence remains the same in translation to the English. In regards to reading Koine Greek generally some folk might say that a certain word order departs from the standard and is therefore "emphatic", but in my opinion this can be very subjective and runs the danger of reading things into the text never meant by the author and I don't ...


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Ἀπαύγασμα, apaugasma, Goodrick-Kohlenberger [GK] G575 or Strong [S] G541, according to the New International Dictionary of New Testament Theology and Exegesis, second edition, revision editor Moisés Silva, volume one, pages 440—441 (slightly expanded on first edition by R.P. Martin, vol. 2, p. 290): Special interest attaches to ἀπαύγασμα, apaugasma, GK ...


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I find it interesting to see how many times questions are asked here that impute bias and ill motives to the translators of the NWT. Of course, it is even more interesting to see how often people offering an answer are willing to jump aboard and do the same, since, presumably, those offering answers would be persons more disposed to objective analysis. To ...


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As you point out, the word φέρω can mean either "carry" or "bear". I think the traditional understanding as "bear" is well supported. I will address the contextual issues that have led you to wonder if it might not mean “bear" in the sense of “produce." Objection #1 OP: Branches are normally associated with trees not vines. True. However, κλήματα are ...


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Bible translators appear to be using it as an instrumental dative usage. http://www.ntgreek.org/learn_nt_greek/classify-dative.htm


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Your analysis is correct, and the following grammar citation provides the grammatical explanation to answer your remaining questions. Please click to enlarge. Thus the "splitting" of the clause with attributives (inserted in the middle of the sentence) is normal in Greek. Such "splitting" would not be typical in English.


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The Hebrew Bible continues to use the tetragarmmaton or the name of God Yahweh. The most accurate English Bible should do the same -contrary to popular belief the Jews did use the name and pronounced it. Abraham, Moses, Jesus, they all knew and used the name of God. The New World Translation (NWT) is a fantastic modern English translation that puts the ...


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Yes. The Hebrew שָׂטָן (śāṭān) is frequently transliterated into Greek as σαταν (satan) or σατανᾶς (satanas) — 36 times in the New Testament. The word διάβολος (diabolos) is also used (37 times). Diabolos is technically an adjective meaning “slanderous”, and it is occasionally used attributively, describing people (e.g. 1 Tim 3:11). However, like ...


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While the Hebrew word השׁטן (saw-tawn') occurs 23 times in the OT, rendered as Satan a total of 17 times in the NET (Job 1:6-12; 2:1-7; Zech 3:1-2), with the other occurrences being translated variously as accuser, adversary, enemy, or to oppose, the Greek words σατάν and σατανᾶς occur 36 times in the NT, rendered every time as Satan in the NET.


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The verse: πρὸς ὃ δύνασθε ἀναγινώσκοντες νοῆσαι τὴν σύνεσίν μου ἐν τῷ μυστηρίῳ τοῦ Χριστοῦ. When you read this, you can perceive my insight into the mystery of Christ.(ESV) [With reference] to which, reading, you are able to know...(my overly literal rendition) Indeed, ὃ is the object of the preposition. That’s a relative pronoun, here declined ...



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