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YE-SHOULD-BE-STUTTER-sayING ye-should-be-using-useless-repetitions, the meaning of the Greek word "battologhshte" from Thayer and Smith's Lexicon means, to stammer to repeat the same things over and over, to use many idle words, to babble, prate. Some suppose the word derived from Battus, a king of Cyrene, who is said to have stuttered; others from ...


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I liken the meaning of exousia to having a driver’s licence. When you have a driver’s licence you have the authority, right and freedom to drive a vehicle on public roads. Here is a sample of most of the verses from 1 Corinthians (NABS) of exousia which demonstrates a range of usage. (I have italicised the English translation of exousia.) The wife ...


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I think if you look at the context of the verses in 1 John you will see that he was very much concerned with protecting believers from false teaching and false teachers. He starts out in verse 7 with: "Dear children, do not let anyone lead you astray." It seems to me, here he was trying to help them to identify false teachers, not necessarily to make ...


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Strictly Grammatical Look is Not Enough H3br3wHamm3r81's answer correctly points out the "οὐ μόνον ... ἀλλὰ καὶ" ("not only ... but also") wording in the verse, and correctly concludes "both" are granted. But that does not entirely answer the question of its meaning, because one must ask in what sense the verse is saying such is granted. There are at ...


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The Idea in Brief The passage leans more toward the reading σπλαγχνισθεὶς based on various textual readings to include Ephraem Syrac's commentary on Tatian's Diatessaron. Discussion Based on best evidence, Arland et al (2012) provided this verse as follows in their Fourth Edition of The Greek New Testament: Mark 1:41 (mGNT) 41 καὶ σπλαγχνισθεὶς ...


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As Wikis noted, there are many Bible versions which render the Greek aor. pass. part. masc. sing. nom. verb CΠΛΑΓΧΝΙCΘΕΙC (σπλαγχνισθεις) as "moved with compassion, " or "moved with pity". The form of that verb, however, properly means "to have the bowels yearn" (Strong's G4697). And the root of that verb form (σπλαγχνoν) refers to "the chief intestines, ...


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In order to explain how Gabriel addressed Mary, it seems a few words along with “κεχαριτωμένη” need to be considered. Seriously, regarding this being “very high status”, “more common word”, etc.; it’s hard to believe two people could give you the same answer to that specific question. Christians of various beliefs and Bibles have considerably different ...


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I don't think there is much to debate about what was graciously given or bestowed (ἐχαρίσθη not ἐδόθη). The οὐ μόνον ("not only") in antithesis to ἀλλὰ καὶ ("but also") seems to clearly indicate not only one thing but also another was given to the Christians. That is, it was graciously given to them by God (cp. 1 Cor. 2:12) not only (1) to believe in Christ, ...


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John 14:26: Is the grammatical evidence ambiguous, does it support "he", or does it support "it"? A useful tool is http://biblehub.com/interlinear/john/14-26.htm, which show most of the grammatical data on a single page. The helper (Paraklētos, N-NMS is grammatically masculine) is the subject The [Holy] Spirit (Pneuma, N-NNS neuter) is (appositional?) ...


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Let me suggest to you an alternative reading. Much of Jesus' teachings on the Sermon of the Mount represent a point of view quite similar to the rabbis (the Pharisees) of his generation as reflected in their teachings recorded later in the Mishna and the Tosefta and in the teachings of the Hebrew Scriptures. This point of view can be supported by Jesus' ...


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The verse appears as follows in the Greek New Testament: Luke 1:37 (mGNT) 37 ὅτι οὐκ ἀδυνατήσει παρὰ τῷ θεῷ πᾶν ῥῆμα. The best literal translation would be as follows: Luke 1:37 (ASV) 37 For no word from God shall be void of power. The Word of God is therefore inviolable, or incapable of non-fulfillment. When the Lord speaks His word(s), the ...


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Short Answer: The shift is not only justified, but I believe it is virtually demanded by the context. From a grammatical standpoint either "sins" or "keeps on sinning" could work. (Technical mumbo jumbo: This is because the verb is in the Koine Greek "present tense" which is used for both ongoing action, as well as punctiliar/undefined action, in present ...



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