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"Abba" vs the other forms of father as mentioned above bring up an interesting yet important linguistical distinction often lost among English speakers. The concept of "informal" vs "diminutive". This is especially important with scripture study. Understanding this point further enlightens our understanding of the Savior's usage of the term "Abba" at that ...


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Lexical Discussion The etymology of the word ἀδελφός is "from the collative a ..., denoting unity, and delphús (n.f.), a womb."1 So the chief idea is as BDAG and other lexicons state,2 that of a true brother or sister coming from the same mother (parents).3 However, as you noted, the word can be used in a variety of figurative, yet still physical relation ...


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This phrase "Righteousness of God." Is intended to indicate all three perspectives: The righteousness which characterizes God, the righteousness imparted by God to believers, and the justification performed by God. So the effort will be to show exegesis for each perspective. The righteousness stabilized two misunderstood foundations Foundation 1: ...


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Fantastic question! Although I don't have time to craft a thorough answer, I'd like to offer some observations. (Note: I am narrowing my discussion to the two principal alternatives you suggested: possessive or subjective genitive -- i.e., God's righteousness, or believers'.) First, I would suggest that Paul's own commentary on this particular phrase is ...


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Most of the time in today's church we are forming an opinion. And, usually, we know very little about the situation or person. So, what is our motive when we judge in this way? Is it love? No. And what does scripture say? It says that if we do not love people who we can see, how can we claim to love God who we cannot see. Also it says that the watching world ...


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Because it is not the Same Key(s) Being Referenced The "key of the house of David" (Isaiah 22:22 LXX, Brenton) and "key of David" (Rev. 3:7, ESV) are referring to the same "key" (singular), the same concept. But "the keys to the kingdom of heaven" (Matt. 16:19, ESV) is not the key of David. To equate the two would probably be similar to (and this is from ...


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YE-SHOULD-BE-STUTTER-sayING ye-should-be-using-useless-repetitions, the meaning of the Greek word βατταλογεω (inflected here as 2nd plural aorist subjunctive βαττολοησητε "battologesete") from Thayer and Smith's Lexicon means, to stammer to repeat the same things over and over, to use many idle words, to babble, prate. Some suppose the word derived ...


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I liken the meaning of exousia to having a driver’s licence. When you have a driver’s licence you have the authority, right and freedom to drive a vehicle on public roads. Here is a sample of most of the verses from 1 Corinthians (NABS) of exousia which demonstrates a range of usage. (I have italicised the English translation of exousia.) The wife ...


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I think if you look at the context of the verses in 1 John you will see that he was very much concerned with protecting believers from false teaching and false teachers. He starts out in verse 7 with: "Dear children, do not let anyone lead you astray." It seems to me, here he was trying to help them to identify false teachers, not necessarily to make ...


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Strictly Grammatical Look is Not Enough H3br3wHamm3r81's answer correctly points out the "οὐ μόνον ... ἀλλὰ καὶ" ("not only ... but also") wording in the verse, and correctly concludes "both" are granted. But that does not entirely answer the question of its meaning, because one must ask in what sense the verse is saying such is granted. There are at ...


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The Idea in Brief The passage leans more toward the reading σπλαγχνισθεὶς based on various textual readings to include Ephraem Syrac's commentary on Tatian's Diatessaron. Discussion Based on best evidence, Arland et al (2012) provided this verse as follows in their Fourth Edition of The Greek New Testament: Mark 1:41 (mGNT) 41 καὶ σπλαγχνισθεὶς ...


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As Wikis noted, there are many Bible versions which render the Greek aor. pass. part. masc. sing. nom. verb CΠΛΑΓΧΝΙCΘΕΙC (σπλαγχνισθεις) as "moved with compassion, " or "moved with pity". The form of that verb, however, properly means "to have the bowels yearn" (Strong's G4697). And the root of that verb form (σπλαγχνoν) refers to "the chief intestines, ...


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In order to explain how Gabriel addressed Mary, it seems a few words along with “κεχαριτωμένη” need to be considered. Seriously, regarding this being “very high status”, “more common word”, etc.; it’s hard to believe two people could give you the same answer to that specific question. Christians of various beliefs and Bibles have considerably different ...


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I don't think there is much to debate about what was graciously given or bestowed (ἐχαρίσθη not ἐδόθη). The οὐ μόνον ("not only") in antithesis to ἀλλὰ καὶ ("but also") seems to clearly indicate not only one thing but also another was given to the Christians. That is, it was graciously given to them by God (cp. 1 Cor. 2:12) not only (1) to believe in Christ, ...



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