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THE POLITICS OF JESUS CRUCIFIXION: I believe that high level politics was played, which let to the crucifixion of Jesus Christ. I read from some ancient records which explained that Yeshua Barabbas (Jesus the son of the father) was not just a robber and killer as portrayed in some gospels, but a rebel trying to overthrow the roman authority and free the ...


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The Greek text of Robert Estienne's Textus Receptus (1551) states, καὶ λέγει αὐτῷ Πᾶς ἄνθρωπος πρῶτον τὸν καλὸν οἶνον τίθησιν καὶ ὅταν μεθυσθῶσιν τότε τὸν ἐλάσσω σὺ τετήρηκας τὸν καλὸν οἶνον ἕως ἄρτι The Greek word in question is μεθυσθῶσιν, which is conjugated from the verb μεθύω in the 3rd person, plural number, aorist tense, passive voice, ...


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The Greek verb used is μεθύω. Definitions include: to be drunken with wine (Perseus Digital Library) to drink to intoxication, i.e. get drunk (Mickelson) to be intoxicated; metaphorically, to be drenched; metaphorically intoxicated with passion, pride, etc. (LSJ; Middle Liddell) be drunken (Slater) be drunken; metaphorically, soaked (Autenrieth) ...


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It would be difficult to give a 100% definitive answer unless there is some commentary by the translation committee on this (which I have not found, but may exist). The following is offered as reasonable conclusions from other evidence. Variation It is deemed by some that good writing avoids an abundance of repetition in word usage. For example, this page ...


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The following is based on internal evidence from within the Greek New Testament. First, in the Greek New Testament the middle voice and the passive voice are conjugated exactly the same in the perfect tense (non-deponent verbs), so to suggest that the particular verb in question is "middle" or "passive" is the opinion of the one interpreting the passage. ...


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It is formally accusative plural neuter, but here used as an adverb. See: http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0057%3Aentry%3Di%29%2Fsos (Especially under IV). The KJV is, as usual, about as literal as it is possible to get in English: “Who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal with God”. Already ...


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“Slave” vs. “servant” in Colossians The crucial point here is not so much the "meaning" of the words "slave," and "servant" as is the manner of their respective uses. Christianity has often given words a new meaning or import. A servant was a hireling; someone who was not owned. If a servant did no like his/her job, employer, wages, working conditions, ...


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As to #1 - Different Quantity of Objects No reconciliation needed across the gospels, because if it is true that Christ said four things, he also said three things. There is no untruth in noting the lesser amount, just a shift in emphasis. Now as far as reconciling four things in the Greek with the three things of the Hebrew text, the Hebrew word לֵבָב ...


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Prelims. Just for comparison, the three synoptic texts from UBS4: Mt 22:37 ὁ δὲ ἔφη αὐτῷ, Ἀγαπήσεις κύριον τὸν θεόν σου ἐν ὅλῃ τῇ καρδίᾳ σου καὶ ἐν ὅλῃ τῇ ψυχῇ σου καὶ ἐν ὅλῃ τῇ διανοίᾳ σου· Mk 12:30 καὶ ἀγαπήσεις κύριον τὸν θεόν σου ἐξ ὅλης τῆς καρδίας σου καὶ ἐξ ὅλης τῆς ψυχῆς σου καὶ ἐξ ὅλης τῆς διανοίας σου καὶ ἐξ ὅλης τῆς ἰσχύος σου. Lk 10:27 ... ...


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περιεργάζομαι means “take more pains than enough about a thing, waste one's labour on it”. As far as I can see, the English word “busybody” was actually coined by Tyndale to translate “curiose agentes” here in 1 Thes. 3,11, and also “alienorum appetitor” in 1 Pet. 4,15. The oldest reference for “busybody” in the OED is in any case to Tyndale’s Bible.


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What is a Busybody? 2 Thessalonians 3:11 When Paul says, “We hear,” his use of the present tense implies that this is an ongoing problem that the church needed to address. In his presentation of the problem, he uses three present participles, which further illustrates the problem as being perspicuous. What the apostles had heard was that certain ...


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What words existed in Greek to express the concept “eternal”? Far and away the most common word for "eternal" in the Greek is αἰώνιος. Of the 68 occurrences of "eternal in the (AV), this word accounts for 63 of those instances. Other Greek words being translated as "eternal" are: ἀΐδιος (found once), and αἰών (found twice) The other two (2) instances ...



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