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10

I will start from the Greek and explain the reasons for the discrepancies between your translation and the ESV (which I consider a faithful rendition of the Greek here). ὅτι οὐκ εἰσπορεύεται αὐτοῦ εἰς τὴν καρδίαν ἀλλ᾿ εἰς τὴν κοιλίαν, καὶ εἰς τὸν ἀφεδρῶνα ἐκπορεύεται, καθαρίζων πάντα τὰ βρώματα; (NA28) since not it enters her/he into mind/soul, ...


5

Summary: The syntax neither confirms nor excludes the possibility that Mary remained a virgin after giving birth. This consideration was foreign to Matthew, and attempting to read his thoughts about the matter into the text is unhelpful.1 It’s easy to find websites and commentaries pointing out, in support of the doctrine of perpetual virginity, that ἕως ...


5

The NET bible renders it as "of his own Son" as well, and adds in note 114 at https://net.bible.org/#!bible/Acts+20:28: 114 tn Or “with his own blood”; Grk “with the blood of his own.” The genitive construction could be taken in two ways: (1) as an attributive genitive (second attributive position) meaning “his own blood”; or (2) as a possessive ...


4

The word 'ἠγέρθη' transliterates into ēgerthē, meaning in its infinitive form 'to rise'. To understand the intended meaning of the word in a specific case we should look both at how the word is used elsewhere in the same work, using a semantic analysis, and at the immediate surrounding context of the narrative, using an informative analysis. Note also that ...


3

No, it is not. As they are used in the New Testament, πλήρης χάριτος describes one's own character and capacity to bestow favor; κεχαριτωμένος is a designation of God's attitude and actions toward the one so labeled. Κεχαριτωμένος χαῖρε, κεχαριτωμένη, ὁ κύριος μετὰ σοῦ. Greetings, O favored one, the Lord is with you!1 Κεχαριτωμένος is a perfect ...


3

The wording of Rev 2:4 Revelation 2:4 Ἀλλὰ ἔχω κατὰ σοῦ (Robinson-Pierpoint MT 1995) Literally this translates as: But I have this1 against you (ESV) The wording of Rev 2:14 Revelation 2:14 Ἀλλ᾽ ἔχω κατὰ σοῦ ὀλίγα (Robinson-Pierpoint MT 1995) Literally this translates as: But I have a few things against you (Rev 2:14 ESV) The wording of Rev 2:20 ...


2

I cannot see any. I'd also like to know why translators thought 'baffle' could be appropriate here. In a loose dynamic translation it's tempting to let it slide. But the same Greek word is used twice in that sentence the only difference being the active vs passive conjugation. ἀνακρίνει verses ἀνακρίνεται (1Co 2:15 BGT) I would translate it in the ...


2

I think the problem with suggesting 'ἐκ μέρους' is implying a part of a specific 'body' as referenced in 1 Corinthians 12:27 is firstly that there is no such mention of any 'body' in the context of the sentence: ἐκ μέρους γὰρ γινώσκομεν καὶ ἐκ μέρους προφητεύομεν· ὅταν δὲ ἔλθῃ τὸ τέλειον, τὸ ἐκ μέρους καταργηθήσεται. It is the latter half of this ...


1

Both phrases express the same idea, but with different wording. πλήρης χάριτος is an adjective ("full") followed by a noun in the genitive case ("of grace"). κεχαριτωμένη is the perfect passive participle feminine of a post-classical denominal verb from the same noun χάρις, with the meaning "having grace bestowed on her". It is a nice example for the way ...


1

The lexical form of the word of interest in προσποιέω. It is inflected here as a third person aorist verb in the middle voice. At the linked LSJ entry section II gives usages “mostly in [the middle voice]”. Subsection 2 gives the basic meaning: take to oneself what does not belong to one, pretend to, lay claim to This resonates with the components of ...


1

The Hebrew is "וְאָזְנֶ֙יךָ֙ תִּשְׁמַ֣עְנָה דָבָ֔ר מֵֽאַחֲרֶ֖יךָ" – "your ears will hear a thing/word from behind you". The Hebrew does not detail who is speaking in ones ear; while many traditional commentaries understand the speaker in ones ear to be God or His messengers (see Rashi, Radak), it is still possible to understand the speaker to be a trickster ...


1

The Greek word ἠγέρθη simply means that Jesus was 'raised' and, without context, could mean that Jesus was raised in the physical world or taken bodily up into heaven. The context we have in Mark, as originally written (to end at verse 16:9), is that Jesus' body was not there, and he was not seen again. Two chapters earlier, in verse 13:26, Mark's Jesus ...


1

Greek word: Κεχαριτωμένη (source) Transliteration: Kecharitomene Translation: Literally,” You, who have been graced” (You that are highly favored, KJV) English: You (Second Person Singular) Have (present tense) Been (past participle of “to be”) Graced (past participle of “to grace”). Greek: KE – perfect tense (prior event/occurrence/happening ...



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