Hot answers tagged

4

No, they are not synonymous. In way of background, we note that the Hebrew rûaḥ is commonly rendered by the Greek pneuma, both commonly rendered by the English spirit. The OP is wondering why, in Isaiah 40:13, the translator has chosen the Greek nous ("mind") rather than the more common pneuma ("spirit"). Despite the default translations rûaḥ ↔ ...


4

Katachthonios in Ancient Greek Literature Literally speaking, καταχθόνιος just means 'under the earth', from the prefix κατά (down) and χθόνιος ([under] earth). But it seems to have been coined with a specific referent:1 Persephone, goddess of the underworld, is daughter of Demeter, goddess of corn, and Zeus Chthonios, the farmer's friend, can scarcely ...


4

If we accept that the apostle Paul is referring to a mirror in 1 Cor 13:12, then what is being reflected? The apostle Paul (as well as other Christians) behold the mirror and see the glory of the Lord. Exegesis The Greek text of 1 Cor. 13:12 states, ΙΒʹ βλέπομεν γὰρ ἄρτι δι᾽ ἐσόπτρου ἐν αἰνίγματι τότε δὲ πρόσωπον πρὸς πρόσωπον ἄρτι γινώσκω ἐκ μέρους ...


4

In Acts 5:3, ψεύσασθαί means "to lie to", or as BDAG has it: to attempt to deceive by lying.... Ac 5:3 Note that this definition (2) is given separately simply to point out that it is a transitive verb that takes a direct (accusative) object. BDAG indicates this by the accusative pronoun τινὰ after the gloss. This contrasts with the usage of ψεύδομαι ...


3

Textus Receptus aligns with commentaries of the Church Fathers. For example, the use of ὡσεὶ in this passage (instead of ὡς) suggests that the Holy Spirit was not a dove, but appeared AS IF a dove. That is, the Greek adverb ὡσεὶ suggest the more analogous rather than literal comparison. Several Church Fathers make this distinction. For example, St. Ambrose ...


2

Romans 10:17: "So then faith cometh by hearing, and hearing by the Word of God" (KJV), or "So faith comes from hearing, and hearing by the word of Christ" (NASB)? James made note that faith in God was not something special: "You believe that there is one God. Good! Even the demons believe that — and shudder" (James 2:19, NIV). Salvation comes through ...


2

If you assume that Jesus was not trying to trick his disciples, Matt 24:34 would be referring to events Jesus had previously mentioned that were to be fulfilled during the generation of his disciples. Those events included the end of the age: "And Jesus said to them, "Do you not see all these things? Assuredly, I say to you, not one stone shall be left ...


2

Attempted Stoning Indicates More than a Claim to Unity of Purpose or Will In John 10:30, what did the Lord Jesus Christ mean when he said, "I and my Father are one"? Perhaps the Lord Jesus Christ meant "I and my Father are one in purpose" or "I and my Father are one in will," but then, how does one explain the Jews' reaction after they heard his statement?...


2

Functional oneness Virtually all modern commentators on John 10:30 take the position that the oneness immediately in view here is a functional oneness, or oneness of will, purpose, and action. D.A. Carson, The Gospel according to John: Verses 28–29 affirm that both the Father and the Son are engaged in the perfect preservation of Jesus’ sheep. Small ...


2

Lexical Analysis The verbs ἐκδημέω (ekdēmeō) and ἐνδημέω (endēmeō) are related to the noun δῆμος (dēmos), which has several meanings. LSJ notes,1 Other related words include the adjectives ἔκδημος (ekdēmos) and ἔνδημος (endēmos),2 as well as the nouns ἐκδημία (ekdēmia) and ἐνδημία (endēmia). The apostle Paul uses the verbs ἐκδημέω and ἐνδημέω ...


2

In ancient Hebrew thought man is composed of two physical elements: dirt breath The making of man into these two elements is graphically described by Moses: Gen 2:7 then the LORD God formed the man of dust from the ground and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, and the man became a living creature. In other words, YHVH scooped up ...


2

The Identification of the Reward The phrase "my reward is with me" («ὁ μισθός μου μετ᾽ ἐμοῦ») in Rev. 22:12 is an allusion to Isa. 40:10 and 62:11 wherein the Hebrew phrase שְׂכָרוֹ אִתּוֹ (sekharo itto) is translated into the LXX by the Greek phrase ὁ μισθὸς αὐτοῦ μετ᾽ αὐτοῦ, both of which translate into English as "his reward is with him."1 ...


2

In Rom. 12:10, the Greek text states, τῇ φιλαδελφίᾳ εἰς ἀλλήλους φιλόστοργοι τῇ τιμῇ ἀλλήλους προηγούμενοι TR, 1550 There are essentially two clauses in Rom. 12:10: τῇ φιλαδελφίᾳ εἰς ἀλλήλους φιλόστοργοι τῇ τιμῇ ἀλλήλους προηγούμενοι According to Tischendorf, there are no relevant textual variants.1 In the second clause, we may supply the ...


1

I have now come across Acts 13:34, which I think gives an answer to my question. The writer of Acts quotes Psalm 16:10 again in 13:35 and just before this writes this in verse 34: ὅτι δὲ ἀνέστησεν αὐτὸν ἐκ νεκρῶν μηκέτι μέλλοντα ὑποστρέφειν εἰς διαφθοράν... as to raising him from the dead, no more to return to corruption,... If his body had ...


1

As I see it, there is indeed a distinction, and it can best be seen in the context of the Corinthian passage. In the previous verse (16:14), Pauls speaks about praying with "my spirit". (τὸ πνεῦμά μου προσεύχεται). This is clearly a reference not to the Holy Spirit, but rather to his "inner spirit". (Note the lower-case 's' in all modern translations; no ...


1

I agree with Susan that this is not an interpretative issue, but I do not agree with the statement that it is merely an orthographic (spelling) issue. Rather it is a grammatical (morphological) issue. The suppletive strong aorist of the verb “to say” occurs both as εἶπον (1st pers. sing. and 3rd pers. pl.), and εἶπα (3rd pers. pl. εἶπαν). The former is more ...


1

John 10:30 (ESV) I and the Father are one. The sentence itself is vague. It doesn't tell us what kind of union they have. John 10:30 (Westcott and Hort 1881) ἐγὼ καὶ ὁ πατὴρ ἕν ἐσμεν. 1 Corinthians 3:8a (Westcott and Hort 1881) ὁ φυτεύων δὲ καὶ ὁ ποτίζων ἕν εἰσιν 1 Corinthians 3:8 has a similar phrase which shows us that it ...


1

I would render 2 Timothy 2:25-26 as: 25 In humility, correcting those who oppose -- lest at some time God should give them a change of heart regarding the knowledge of the truth -- 26 that they might return to clarity of mind from the entrapment of the Devil, having been taken alive by him into his will. Details for verse 26: 2 Timothy 3:8-9, I ...


1

Aramaic is a Semitic language ala Hebrew and Arabic. In fact it could be considered a dialect of Hebrew though it is different enough to be considered its own language, much like the Romantic languages that branched off of Latin: http://jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/1707-aramaic-language-among-the-jews "Abba" means "my father" which was more useful for ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible