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Thank you all for your insight full comments. I would say that I favor the conclusion of Thayer's Greek Lexicon (which I found here: http://biblehub.com/greek/2644.htm ) Specifically that "but the passive is used also where only one ceases to be angry with another and receives him into favor; thus καταλλαγεις, received by Cyrus into favor, Xenophon, an. 1, ...


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There are 28 instances of the Aorist Passive Imperative (Second Person Plural) in the Greek New Testament (NA28), which are found in 27 verses. Please click on the thumbnail, below, to view all of these instances in the New Testament. The Aorist Passive Imperative (Second Person Plural) is therefore not uncommon. Some verbs, such as δεήθητε (Matt 9:38), ...


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Aorist In non-indicative moods (like the imperative) the "tense" indicates aspect and not time. So the aorist here indicates either a puntiliar (instantaneous) or undefined (generic) kind of action. Passive The active voice is used in Greek when the subject is performing the action (e.g. "he is eating"), while the passive is used to indicate an action ...


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The tense of Deuteronomy 30:11-14 is open to debate but is usually taken as the narrative present, with some debating that it could or should be read as future oriented. However, it is drawing a long straw to say that anything written in the future tense is a prophecy, or that a reasonable person would expect it to be a prophecy. Imperative statements are ...



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