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-3

Εὐλογητὸς ὁ θεὸς καὶ πατὴρ τοῦ κυρίου ἡμῶν Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ, ὁ εὐλογήσας ἡμᾶς ἐν πάσῃ εὐλογίᾳ πνευματικῇ ἐν τοῖς ἐπουρανίοις ἐν Χριστῷ, Eph 1:3 WH ὅτι πᾶν κτίσμα θεοῦ καλὸν καὶ οὐδὲν ἀπόβλητον μετὰ εὐχαριστίας λαμβανόμενον• 1 Tm 4:4 WH καὶ αὐτῇ ἡ ἰσχὺς καὶ τὸ βασίλειον καὶ ἡ ἐξουσία καὶ ἡ μεγαλειότης τῶν πάντων αἰώνων εὐλογητὸς ὁ θεὸς τῆς ἀληθείας 1 Es 4:40 ...


-1

πρὸς γὰρ τὴν ἀνδρείαν αὐτῶν τῆς ἀρετῆς καὶ τὴν ἐπὶ ταῖς βασάνοις αὐτῶν ὑπομονὴν ὁ τύραννος ἀπιδὼν ἀνεκήρυξεν ὁ Ἀντίοχος τοῖς στρατιώταις αὐτοῦ εἰς ὑπόδειγμα τὴν ἐκείνων ὑπομονὴν 4 Maccabees 17:23 Septuagint For the tyrant Antiochus, when he saw the courage of their virtue and their endurance under the tortures, proclaimed them to his soldiers as an example ...


0

Quite simply, because 'YHWH' (Yahweh) is incorrect. 'YHVH' (Ye-Ho-Vah/Je-Ho-Vah) is the correct form of God's name. So the name 'Yah/Jah' really is a contraction of 'Yehovah/Jehovah', dropping all but the first and last two letters. In English it is pronounced 'Je-ho-vah', while in Hebrew it is pronounced 'Ye-ho-vah' (just as 'Joseph' is pronounced ...


1

It is possible that Yah is not formed by the first two letters of YHWH, but by the first and last. Nehemiah Gordon proposes this theory to account for Yah, while disagreeing with the scholarly consensus regarding the pronunciation Yahweh. He states that in ancient Hebrew, contractions were commonly formed by taking the first and final letters. ...


1

The Idea in Brief The best reading for this verse would accept the qere as suggested by the Masoretic editors. That is, the following translation would capture the full essence of this verse: Job 13:15 15 Look, he is going to kill me: I wait for him [to strike]; in the meantime, I am going to argue [my case] before Him. Why does the ketiv or qere ...


5

The considerations here are much the same as those I discussed in a previous answer. I have attempted to develop those ideas and tailor it to the passage in question. [I]s it incorrect to read this clause as "love is God"? Yes, it is. In Greek, the subject of a clause can generally be identified as the substantive in the nominative case. However, ...



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