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7

There are a couple of different ways to answer your first question. I will attempt an answer from a linguistics perspective, specifically with regards to the lexical aspect of the verb in question. The dominant perspective on lexical aspect of verb tenses for the last few decades has been Actionsart. This deals with how the verb interacts with time. ...


6

I don't think there is much to debate about what was graciously given or bestowed (ἐχαρίσθη not ἐδόθη). The οὐ μόνον ("not only") in antithesis to ἀλλὰ καὶ ("but also") seems to clearly indicate not only one thing but also another was given to the Christians. That is, it was graciously given to them by God (cp. 1 Cor. 2:12) not only (1) to believe in Christ, ...


5

The context (see verse 6) justifies translating the v' as "but." Furthermore, it clearly demonstrates that she is not actually black but simply very darkly tanned. Do not stare at me because I am swarthy [i.e. dark], For the sun has burned me. My mother’s sons were angry with me; They made me caretaker of the vineyards, But I have not taken care ...


5

The aorist tense "presents an occurrence in summary, viewed as a whole from the outside, without regard for the internal make-up of the occurrence."1 Wallace explains, This contrasts with the present and imperfect, which portray the action as an ongoing process. It may be helpful to think of the aorist as taking a snapshot of the action while the ...


5

וְשֶׂ֣רֶט לָנֶ֗פֶשׁ לֹ֤א תִתְּנוּ֙ בִּבְשַׂרְכֶ֔ם וּכְתֹ֣בֶת קַֽעֲקַ֔ע לֹ֥א תִתְּנ֖וּ בָּכֶ֑ם אֲנִ֖י יְהוָֽה Grammatically speaking, "the dead" isn't even mentioned in the original Hebrew text. It was simply "the soul." In Hebraic thought, the soul is the unified body and spirit. The soul can be dead, or the soul can be alive. The text doesn't say one ...


5

It is Passive The verb is ἐκρατοῦντο (ekratounto), which is the imperfect passive indicative 3rd plural of the verb κρατέω (krateō), which in this context has the idea of "restrain."1 However, it is not that they did not "see" Jesus (v.15) in some respect, but that when they saw Him, they did not "know" (ἐπιγνῶναι; epignōnai) it was Him, hence the NRSV ...


4

May Viably Be Construed as Either Middle or Passive Voice Your observation about the grammar of the verb compared to the English translations is very astute. Unfortunately, I do not think grammar itself will entirely answer this question. And context fits either option as being viable as well. If Passive, then in a Sense, All Three of Your Ideas are ...


4

To the grammarian it may seem like beating a dead horse to protest that the aorist does not necessarily reflect the nature of the action or event it covers. But the horse is not dead; he is very much alive and cavorting rather freely in exegetical and theological pastures. The fallacy of "theology in the aorist tense" stubbornly persists, even in the ...


4

Those are adjectives, not pronouns. They are plural neuter nominatives. "And all those who are mine are yours, and all of yours are mine..." BibleHub is right. It does jive with the KJV: because they are adjectives and not pronouns, the plural they carry is the plural of the things they are modifying. In other words, they act like other plural adjectives. ...


3

Strictly Grammatical Look is Not Enough H3br3wHamm3r81's answer correctly points out the "οὐ μόνον ... ἀλλὰ καὶ" ("not only ... but also") wording in the verse, and correctly concludes "both" are granted. But that does not entirely answer the question of its meaning, because one must ask in what sense the verse is saying such is granted. There are at ...


3

This answer is largely adapted from Paul Ellingworth, The Epistle to the Hebrews: A Commentary on the Greek Text, 1993. For more see pages 237ff. The main point of this verse is to apply Psalm 95:7-11 and set the stage for the soon-to-be-quoted Genesis 2:2 in the next verse. It is helpful to consider the context: Let us fear therefore, lest perhaps ...


3

Robertson says, "See Isaiah 66:24." Reading Isaiah 66:24: Then they will go forth and look On the corpses of the men Who have transgressed against Me. For their worm will not die And their fire will not be quenched; And they will be an abhorrence to all mankind. ...makes it pretty clear that "their" refers to "the men who have transgressed against ...


3

The verb דִּבֵּר (dibber), which is conjugated in binyan Pi'el, is commonly followed by prepositions to indicate the person to or with whom the speaker is speaking. For example, אֶל (Gen. 8:15), לְ (Jdg. 14:7), עִם (Gen. 31:29), אֵת (Gen. 23:8), עַל (Jer. 6:10), and of course, בְּ (Hab. 2:1). In Num. 12:1 and 12:8, the context implies that Aharon and Miryam ...


3

The preposition ב can be translated in many different ways (in, with, through, against, while, when, for, by etc.) depending on how it functions in its context. In num 12:1 it makes good sense to translate it as "against" but the case could be made for translating it as simply "to" or "with." In v2, the case could be made for translating it as simply "to ...


3

This verse has a parallel in Matt. 26:46, in which the same verb ἄγωμεν occurs. The particular conjugation ἄγωμεν also occurs in the following verses. It is the equivalent of the English phrase, "Let's go..." Mark 1:38 John 11:7 John 11:15 John 14:31 Thayer describes this usage sense as intransitive (lacking a direct object).1 However, it can be followed ...


3

The forms you likely learned are pronouns: 1st person, singular number (equivalent to English "I," "me") ἐγώ μου, ἐμοῦ μοι, ἐμοἰ με, ἐμέ 2nd person, singular number (equivalent to English "you") σύ σου, σοῦ σοι, σοί σε, σέ However, the forms in John 17:10 are indeed adjectives, as Kazark mentioned, based on ...


3

A Study of Other Uses with ἐν in the NT There are 6 or 7 occurrences using ἐν in Scripture related to πιστεύω1 (depending on textual variant, which occurs in the verse in question), compared to roughly 46 using εἰς (I did not check for variants in these, hence "roughly") which are noting the thing/person that is believed (i.e. the content of what is ...


2

The "Constructio Praegnans" (lit., loaded-arrangement) provides one possible perspective, which Smyth (1920) describes in his Greek Grammar. He indicates that the "Constructio Praegnans" occurs with verbs of motion with tenses indicating completed action. If the "Constructio Praegnans" were relevant in the passage of John 3:15-16, notwithstanding that no ...


2

The verse appears as follows in the Greek New Testament. 1 Peter 4:6 (GNT) 6 εἰς τοῦτο γὰρ καὶ νεκροῖς εὐηγγελίσθη ἵνα κριθῶσι μὲν κατὰ ἀνθρώπους σαρκὶ ζῶσι δὲ κατὰ θεὸν πνεύματι. [NOTE: Arland et al. (2012) note no variants of this verse extant.] There are three verbs in this verse: εὐαγγελίζω = Aorist Passive Indicative (3 person singular) = "the ...


1

Excellent question, Susan. There are different perspectives on this. Some take it that John's own thinking about the epistle changed at this point in his writing, and he began to think of it as a work that would be completed (e.g. Longacre). Others take it that the first set of statements is in regard to what he is presently writing, while the second set is ...


1

The two verses are parallel and complementary. That is, the context points to delivery from the kingdom of darkness, and in this respect one "sees" the Kingdom of God. In this regard, the Apostle Paul cited the words of Jesus, when he (Paul) was before King Agrippa: Acts 26:15-18 (NASB) 15 And I said, ‘Who are You, Lord?’ And the Lord said, ‘I am Jesus ...


1

The Idea in Brief The Masoretic Text does not indicate here the appearance of the consecutive waw with the Hebrew verb יָשַׁב (to dwell) but instead the consecutive waw with the Hebrew verb שׁוּב (to return). This conclusion comes from the marginalia of the Masoretic Text, which is the Massorah Parva. Discussion The Masoretic Text of the verse appears as ...


1

The Greek word is καταργέω, which means to destroy, nullify, or render impotent. The word occurs 26 times in Christian New Testament: please click here to view each respective context, usage, and translation; and three times in the Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible, which is the Septuagint: please click here to view each respective context, usage, and ...


1

The causal agent of the passive voice does not appear to be God, but unbelief. That is, there is compelling biblical evidence that the agent of the blindness in this context (in the passive voice) was "slowness of heart." First we see that when Jesus had earlier spoken of his imminent death and resurrection, the disciples did not understand because at that ...



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