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Jesus was publicly declaring himself to be the "son of David" and the rightful king of Israel. But there’s an even bigger reason to connect Jesus’ entrance into Jerusalem with his claim to be king than this little prophecy in Zachariah 9. We know that the act of riding a mule into Jerusalem was the sign by which Solomon was proclaimed king of Israel. This ...


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It depends on what one sees as the point of fulfilling the Old Testament prophecies. If you mean "is the only reason to ride a donkey because it matches the prophecy" as being a formulaic fulfillment then perhaps one has to expand the understanding of why the prophecy exists. The prophecy doesn't just identify the mode of transport, it also says something. ...


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Jesus had walked all the way from Galilee and could indeed walk the final few hours into Jerusalem, but is shown as making a triumphant entry, riding on a donkey. This provides a dramatic introduction to the final stage of Jesus' mission: Jesus' very knowledge that there was a young colt awaiting him in a nearby village, demonstrates his powers (Mark ...


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We have to understand that the moneychangers and those who sold animals were performing a necessary service for the sacrifices offered in the temple, and were sanctioned by the temple authorities. The role of the moneychangers was to exchange the Roman coinage of Palestine, which was being constantly devalued, for coinage of a fixed value so that sacrificial ...


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There’s more to Jesus’ violent actions in the temple then the exchange rate. Here are three all too often overlooked reasons Jesus cleansed the temple. 1. Jesus as the “Son of David” is the Builder of God’s House In His entrance into Jerusalem on a donkey, Jesus claimed to be like Solomon, the “Son of David,” in his coronation (1 Kings 1) and thus ...


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Why a kiss? There are certainly far less intimate ways to identify someone. Why was the kiss chosen as their signal? A kiss was a common greeting among friends (cp. Rom. 16:16; 1 Cor. 16:20; 2 Cor. 13:12; 1 Thes. 5:26; 1 Pet. 5:14). Since Judas was one of Jesus' twelve original apostles, they would have shared a vinculum amicitiae, and a kiss would have ...


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Short Answer The answer has everything to do with Psalms 2 and Jesus' claim to be king. Judas chose to sarcastically betray Jesus, the "supposed Son of God”, with a kiss. His kiss is deeply ironic. As with the soldiers in the crucifixion, He mocks Jesus in his claim to be the rightful king of Israel. Long Answer When Jesus entered Jerusalem on a donkey, ...


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There were indeed many gospels, although this is not really what the author of Luke's Gospel is saying. He knew of Mark's Gospel, as it has been established by critical scholars that this was a major source used in compiling Luke. He also knew of the hypothetical 'Q' document, sometimes known as the 'Q' Gospel, as that was also a source he used. Matthew's ...


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The word 'Gospel' is never applied to the records of Jesus' life by the Bible its self, rather it seems that the word is used of the message proclaimed, see for example: Matt. 4:23, Matt. 9:35, Matt. 11:5, Matt. 24:14, Matt. 26:13, Mk. 1:1, 14-15, Mk. 13:10, Mk. 14:9, Mk. 16:15, Lk. 4:18, Lk. 7:22, Lk. 9:6, Lk. 20:1, Acts 8:25, Acts 14:7, 21, Acts 15:7, Acts ...


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Likely yes. There are extant supposed "gospels" that are not considered Canon. Early Fathers of the Church mention other gospels such as an alleged Gospel to Hebrews, written in 2nd Temple Hebrew, which may have existed, and may have been lost in the great Alexandrian fire.



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