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4

We can only take the literal meaning of the word of the word we find in the text. Wherever a word can have two meanings it should generally be read as normally used in the Greek language. The word used in both Matthew and Mark is ἀκρίς which translates as grasshopper.


3

This is not possible, unless (in the first feast, feeding the five thousand) the disciples made a foolish assumption: Mark 6:36: Send them away, that they may go into the country round about, and into the villages, and buy themselves bread: for they have nothing to eat. From that verse, we ought to assume the crowd really did have nothing to eat. Even ...


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The night is death. Work refers to serving God and doing good works. Jesus, in this passage, senses his own coming death. In the verse after, John 9:5, Jesus says that he is the light of the world as long as he is in the world. Therefore, when he leaves the world (in the sense of his death and ascension), day becomes night. John 6:29 mentions a single all-...


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I do not see much textual evidence, in most translations, suggesting that Yeshua actually drank the second drink offered(except in the NASB and possibly a handful of other translations)... It seems to be a common assumption people make when reading these verses... In Matthew 26:29(NASB) Yeshua said: "But I say to you, I will not drink of this fruit of the ...


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In addition to several of the meanings of Salt given here in other answers, the word Salary is derived from the latin "salarium" which is associated with Roman soldiers who were paid in salt according to Roman historian Pliny the Elder in Plinius Naturalis Historia XXXI. In this writing he states "[I]n Rome... the soldier's pay was originally salt and the ...


1

It is impossible to answer this question beyond giving a baseless opinion. We have exactly what is in the text and nothing more. Even if we had a tradition to refer to in this matter, it would be nothing more than that - a tradition - and really have no more weight than the opinion of anyone here, because of a lack of information from the text. One thing ...


1

Why would Jesus at first refuse the comfort of alcohol, and then later not refuse it? Three considerations: was it alcohol; was it comforting; did he refuse it? "Someone ran, filled a sponge with wine vinegar, put it on a staff, and offered it to Jesus to drink. 'Now leave him alone. Let's see if Elijah comes to take him down,' he said." (Mark 15:36,...


1

Harmonizing John 1, Mark 1, Matthew 4:19, and Luke 5:1-11 All of these passages speak about a call of Peter. But only Mark and Matthew recall the same event. The order in chronology is John, Mark and Matthew, Luke. JESUS MEETS PETER In John 1, Jesus in introduced to Peter by Andrew. Andrew was following Jesus since the previous day based on his former ...


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The gospel of Matthew has a lot of interesting things to say about bread. Its first mention is when the devil tempts Jesus in Matthew 4, commanding the stones to become bread. Jesus refuses to do a bread miracle to satiate his own hunger, despite the fact that he will ultimately feed at least 9,000 men with miraculous bread. Jesus' rebuke of the devil says ...


1

Looking at the verses in context, I would say that age is not implied. First, the context is different in each case so I will take them by instance. Matthew 10:23-25 22 and you will be hated by all for my name’s sake... 24 “A disciple is not above his teacher, nor a servant above his master. 25 It is enough for the disciple to be like his ...


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I will focus on the difference between the account in John's Gospel and that in the Synoptics. I will start with two assumptions: John had the text of the Synoptics available before him when composing his Gospel, so that when he deviated from the Synoptics' account he did it on purpose and for a purpose, which was providing not just factual accuracy (which ...


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The simplistic answer would be to say that each evangelist chose to include historical details that he thought to be relevant, while omitting other details that he knew to be true but felt it not necessary to report. This overlooks the fact that Matthew and Luke are regarded by almost all New Testament scholars to have been substantially based on Mark's ...


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I will address only the first two issues in the question, regarding dates. The bottom line of my answer is that John is factually accurate and that he intentionally deviated from the Synoptics for the purpose of noting important theological meaning, not for the sake of dating accuracy itself. There are two possible chronologies, which I will call C14 and ...


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Question Can John's Passion chronology be reconciled with that of the Synoptics? Answer: A "High Day", (John 19:31), is indicative of a "High Holy Day Sabbath". There were two Sabbath's that week. Whichever day of the week a High Holy Day fell on - that day was a Sabbath, (See Wikipedia: Special Sabbaths) - even if the very next day was also a ...


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Problem Here's the dilemma for me. Now the first day of the feast of unleavened bread the disciples came to Jesus, saying unto him, Where wilt thou that we prepare for thee to eat the passover? And he said, Go into the city to such a man, and say unto him, The Master saith, My time is at hand; I will keep the passover at thy house with my disciples. And ...



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