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11

This is a textual issue. That is, some manuscripts have the words and fasting while others don’t. The NA28 includes the text similar to the GNT you quote: . . . τοῦτο τὸ γένος ἐν οὐδενὶ δύναται ἐξελθεῖν εἰ μὴ ἐν προσευχῇ (NA28) . . . this kind cannot be driven out by anything but prayer (ESV) The apparatus notes the variant you ask about (the ...


9

A Plausible Majority Text Argument Susan's answer has correctly given the direct answer to your question when she states: This is a textual issue. That is, some manuscripts have the words and fasting while others don’t. That is the simple fact. Which manuscript tradition the particular translation in question is following determines the omission or ...


8

Mark is more reliable.¹ Even if you were to completely discredit Mark², something is more than nothing. You cannot reasonably compare the accuracy of one document that exists with one that is only speculated to exist. Anybody that tries to tell you differently is selling something³. Answering your stated question is really that simple. In the world of ...


7

Another addendum to Susan's fine answer and ScottS's alternative account. All manuscripts are not the same, which is why the text critic's job is not simply that of counting noses. We have two possible scenarios an original shorter reading, which was subsequently expanded in transmission by the addition of "+ and fasting" after "prayer"; an original ...


6

Is Matthew 5.5 in the same line of thought? To start, we should double check that Matthew 5.5 is relevant to interpreting any texts from the Hebrew scriptures ('Old Testament'). We want to be careful not to group it with those texts if they're not even using the same language. A simple way to verify this is to compare Matthew 5.5 with the Greek translation ...


6

The presence of synagogues hasn't been corroborated by much archaeological evidence. [1] However, synagogues in the land (as opposed to the diaspora) are mentioned a handful of times by Josephus, but all of them were located north, away from Jerusalem. This includes a synagogue (Josephus uses the term proseuche) at Tiberius in Galilee. (Josephus, Life ...


6

I Personally Believe Peter Denied Christ Exactly Six Times I did a study of this exact problem in my seminary studies for my M.Div., and just looking at the textual details and collating the accounts came to the conclusion that the answer is best resolved as seeing it as two sets of denials of three each, with each group of the three occurring prior to a ...


4

In fact, Paul Verhoeven actually leans this way: Palm branches are typical of Sukkot, as they were brought to Jerusalem from the Jordan Valley in September and used to construct the tabernacles (skēnai). X. Léon-Dufour writes, "We can take it as assued that Jesus once visited Jerusalem in the autumn, at the feast of Tabernacles," and M. Goguel agrees. R. ...


4

While Matthew 5:5 echoes Psalm 37:11, it's not obvious that they have the same horizons, so I will take them one at a time and then offer a summary. Psalm 37:11 A canonical reading of Psalm 37:11 places the verse in the context of a number of Psalms about David (essentially 3-41). Psalm 37 itself is marked as "Of David" indicating that the primary referent ...


4

Yes. Dr. C. Matthew McMahon writes that the belief that the four gospels were written in Hebrew is an idea that is not consistent with the manuscript evidence, and furthermore he draws the conclusion that believing that the four gospels were written in Hebrew is detrimental to knowing who God is, what he is like, and that Jesus is both God and man. See his ...


3

About Time Does not need to be "the same" time, and is not the same time Notice that the Mk 15:25 (3rd hour) is stated as "when they crucified him." In the Jn 19:14 passage (6th hour) the reference is to when Pilate sat in his place of judgement for the final condemnation of Christ to the cross. There are time differences The easy way to state it is that ...


2

While I don't have any specific references to modern scholarship, Adam typology is definetly evident in the Gospels. 1. Luke presents Jesus as a new Adam. This is beyond a doubt Luke’s purpose in the placement and arrangement of Jesus’ genealogy. Unlike Matthew who places his genealogy at the outset of his gospel, Luke places it immedietly after Jesus’ ...


2

TWO KINGDOMS SIMILAR In the Bible, there are two different kingdoms that are mentioned. These two kingdoms are the kingdom of heaven and the kingdom of God. (Matthew 3:1-2 [KJV]) 1 In those days came John the Baptist, preaching in the wilderness of Judaea, 2 And saying, Repent ye: for the kingdom of heaven is at hand. (Mark 1:14-15 [KJV]) 14 Now after ...


2

This is one event, told four separate ways but included in all four gospels to fulfill Jesus prophesy about her. Luke’s account, for whatever reason, is simply not in chronological order. If we allow all four of theses stories to harmonize, watch what happens… there is something really special. In Luke’s account (LK 7:40), Jesus begins by telling Simon the ...


2

In the story you point out it makes sense to think about their sources. It seems that Matthew and Mark had almost the exact same source material--probably either well known oral tradition or an actual document that is lost to us. Luke seems to have had the same source as Matthew and Mark, but also some extra information that he decided to include. John, ...


2

I believe there were not more than three denials, based on the Two Sources hypothesis accepted in one form or another by the majority of New Testament critical scholars. This hypothesis states that the Gospels of Matthew and Luke were substantially based on Mark's Gospel, with some further material, mainly sayings attributed to Jesus, from the hypothetical ...


2

I believe you answered your own question with the scripture you attached with it. And it came to pass, that, while they communed together and reasoned, Jesus himself drew near, and went with them. But their eyes were holden that they should not know him. The point was that Christ withheld who He was from them. Most likely for the purpose of seeing ...


2

The story of turning real water into real wine (most scholars would argue that the wine was real) presumes the moderation of the wedding guests. There is no more reason to think that the guests were drunk then there is reason to think that Jesus feed 5000 gluttons a huge amount of fish and bread. On one hand the story clearly suggests that the guests at a ...


1

John Dominic Crossan, in The Birth of Christianity, argues that the Q document, the Gospel of Thomas and some of the sayings in Mark's Gospel are based on an earlier Greek document he calls the Common Sayings Tradition. First of all, to the extent they are based on the same common source, they stand or fall together according to the reliability of that ...


1

There are depths within this question. If we consider the nature of the writers of the four accounts it may help put things into perspective. Matthew (Matthias Levi - described as the son of Alphaeus, although there are problems with this) may have been the author of ‘Matthew’s’ gospel, but more probably ‘Matthew’ is a dedication. Even so the author may ...


1

Although the Jews began their days at dusk and Romans began their days at midnight, that is not how either civilisation measured the passage of time. Simply speaking, the mechanical clock had not yet been invented. E. G. Richards describes in Mapping Time how shadow clocks were used to divide the hours of daylight up into exactly 12 hours of variable length ...


1

The Greek adjective here is ἄξιος, which has two meanings in the Christian New Testament: (a) It means to be deserving. So the slave was "deserving" of a flogging (Lu 12:48); the prodigal son was not "deserving" to be called the son of his father (Lk 15:19); John the Baptist was not "deserving" to untie the sandals of Jesus (Jn 1:27); the Centurion in ...



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