Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

Short Answer: Yes, it is definitely possible for John's chronology to be reconciled with that of the Synoptics. As the following chart shows, the sequence of Passion events recorded in John is in perfect harmony with the sequence in the Synoptics. When John's terminology is properly understood, it becomes clear that John's chronology does not contradict that ...


6

Is Matthew 5.5 in the same line of thought? To start, we should double check that Matthew 5.5 is relevant to interpreting any texts from the Hebrew scriptures ('Old Testament'). We want to be careful not to group it with those texts if they're not even using the same language. A simple way to verify this is to compare Matthew 5.5 with the Greek translation ...


6

The presence of synagogues hasn't been corroborated by much archaeological evidence. [1] However, synagogues in the land (as opposed to the diaspora) are mentioned a handful of times by Josephus, but all of them were located north, away from Jerusalem. This includes a synagogue (Josephus uses the term proseuche) at Tiberius in Galilee. (Josephus, Life ...


6

There were two main qualifications, one is primarily cultural, and one is really universal. A host family (or person) would need to be hospitable. Abraham, Lot, and others throughout the Old Testament were "lovers of strangers" (to use an anachronistic expression derived from the Greek word for hospitality). In the ANE, hospitality and being a good ...


6

Mark records the partial healing of the blind man to illustrate Jesus healing of his disciples partial understanding. Though the disciples see that Jesus is the Christ, they see only in part. Jesus is the Christ but not the Christ of their expectations. The two-part healing of the blind man (8:22-26) is sandwhiched between Jesus' rebuke of the disciples ...


5

The Jewish leaders wanted to arrest and kill Jesus quietly because they were afraid of how the people might react. Matthew 26:3-5 says, Then the chief priests and the elders of the people were gathered together in the court of the high priest, named Caiaphas; and they plotted together to seize Jesus by stealth and kill Him. But they were saying, 'Not ...


5

In the Hebrew Bible, salt is both a disinfectant and preservative, but if the salt loses its integrity (or its "flavor" to preserve) the result is disintegration. When Jesus talked about salt "trampled under feet," he was referring to this latter connotation of disintegration found in the Hebrew Bible. So when salt maintains its integrity (or its "flavor" to ...


5

I Personally Believe Peter Denied Christ Exactly Six Times I did a study of this exact problem in my seminary studies for my M.Div., and just looking at the textual details and collating the accounts came to the conclusion that the answer is best resolved as seeing it as two sets of denials of three each, with each group of the three occurring prior to a ...


4

One common argument is that in John's gospel, but not in the synoptics, Jesus is referred to as the "lamb of God" (John 1:29 and 1:36) and in John but not in the synoptics Jesus dies at the same time as the passover lambs are slaughtered. For example, below is a quote from Ehrman's "Jesus, Interrupted", though this argument is certainly not original to him. ...


4

The are some scholars who think this is a conflict as they suppose the passover is being eaten on conflicting days, but a simple answer is that there is no conflict. A simple solution is that John 18:28 is not referring to the evening passover meal which Jesus ate the previous evening but the daytime passover feast that followed the next day: And here ...


4

While Matthew 5:5 echoes Psalm 37:11, it's not obvious that they have the same horizons, so I will take them one at a time and then offer a summary. Psalm 37:11 A canonical reading of Psalm 37:11 places the verse in the context of a number of Psalms about David (essentially 3-41). Psalm 37 itself is marked as "Of David" indicating that the primary referent ...


4

The confusing passage here seems to be Matthew's account, which we will come to in due course. The other accounts, including the apocryphal Gospel of Peter give rather clear indications of timing, so we begin by examining them: When the Sabbath was over, Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James, and Salome bought spices so that they might go to anoint ...


4

Jesus had the legal authority to cleanse the temple not because he was a rabbi but because he claimed to be like Solomon, the "Son of David" and thus the builder of God's house (2 Samuel 7). This is evident from a careful reading of the gospels through the lens of the Hebrew Bible. In the synoptics the temple cleansing is immediately preceded by Jesus' ...


4

Yes. Dr. C. Matthew McMahon writes that the belief that the four gospels were written in Hebrew is an idea that is not consistent with the manuscript evidence, and furthermore he draws the conclusion that believing that the four gospels were written in Hebrew is detrimental to knowing who God is, what he is like, and that Jesus is both God and man. See his ...


3

In Ps. 69:21 it says,"They gave Me also gall for My meat; and in My thirst they gave Me vinegar to drink." This is after the Psalmist says in vs 9,"For the zeal of thine house hath eaten Me up; and the reproaches of them that reproached thee are fallen on Me." Both scenes were witnessed in the life of Jesus: when He drove out the moneychangers out of the ...


3

Concerning the accuracy of the gospel The introduction to Luke's gospel is in "high" Greek, as was common in historical writing at the time. Moreover, the author claims to have researched events well. We know that the author had gained access to Mark, and claims to have utilized several additional sources until he got "perfect knowledge" of the events ...


3

For reference, see: http://hermeneutics.stackexchange.com/a/5096/862 The Greek word κύριος literally means "master." Confusion occurs because it appears to be used in the Greek Septuagint to translate the Tetragrammaton, the Hebrew word יהוה. But, in fact, it is not being used to translate יהוה, but instead, אֲדֹנָי. It was used to translate אֲדֹנָי because ...


3

Leviticus 23 begins with the definition of the Sabbath day, and then equates the Sabbath with the "appointed times," which are the holy convocations (or the feasts and festivals). In other words, most (but not all) of the Jewish feasts and festivals were declared automatic Sabbath days in the Law of Moses, which means that even though they may not fall on ...


3

Evangelion means simply "good news." The Greek comes from aggelion which simply means "message or news." (Note that two gammas together in Greek are pronounced as "ng.") The word in question has an "eu-" prefix which simple means "good." Thus, it is "good news." Always start with the simple meaning. If it is good news of a military victory, that will be ...


3

Jesus says in John 18:36, My kingdom is not of this world. If it were, my servants would fight to prevent my arrest by the Jewish leaders. But now my kingdom is from another place. But there's a problem with that statement. Peter has been fighting. And he attacked Malchus, a man who's name means king or kingdom. Only John of the four gospel ...


3

According to the gospel account by John, Jesus was asking for clarification from Pilate through a rhetorical question. That is, Jesus was clarifying with Pilate as to whether or not the indictment was second-hand (i.e., is it that others say that I am a King of the Jews?) versus Pilate himself. In other words, was the indictment because Rome saw Jesus as a ...


3

About Time Does not need to be "the same" time, and is not the same time Notice that the Mk 15:25 (3rd hour) is stated as "when they crucified him." In the Jn 19:14 passage (6th hour) the reference is to when Pilate sat in his place of judgement for the final condemnation of Christ to the cross. There are time differences The easy way to state it is that ...


2

TWO KINGDOMS SIMILAR In the Bible, there are two different kingdoms that are mentioned. These two kingdoms are the kingdom of heaven and the kingdom of God. (Matthew 3:1-2 [KJV]) 1 In those days came John the Baptist, preaching in the wilderness of Judaea, 2 And saying, Repent ye: for the kingdom of heaven is at hand. (Mark 1:14-15 [KJV]) 14 Now after ...


2

This is one event, told four separate ways but included in all four gospels to fulfill Jesus prophesy about her. Luke’s account, for whatever reason, is simply not in chronological order. If we allow all four of theses stories to harmonize, watch what happens… there is something really special. In Luke’s account (LK 7:40), Jesus begins by telling Simon the ...


2

There exist a few possibilities for the translation here. Should John 20:28b be understood as predicate nominatives ("You are my Lord and my God") or as vocatives ("My Lord and my God!")? I understand it to be the first because the context is confessional. Thomas has proclaimed he will not believe until he sees and feels. Now he sees and confesses (The ...


2

Mt 27:48, Mk 15:26 - Jesus is offered sour wine on a sponge Lk 23:36 - The soldiers offer Jesus sour wine Jn 19:28-29 - Jesus is offered sour wine from a vessel on a sponge These verses are about a different drink of wine than that in question. Mt 27:34 - The soldiers offer Jesus wine mingled with gall before he is crucified, which He rejects. Mk 15:23 ...


2

I believe there were not more than three denials, based on the Two Sources hypothesis accepted in one form or another by the majority of New Testament critical scholars. This hypothesis states that the Gospels of Matthew and Luke were substantially based on Mark's Gospel, with some further material, mainly sayings attributed to Jesus, from the hypothetical ...


2

In the story you point out it makes sense to think about their sources. It seems that Matthew and Mark had almost the exact same source material--probably either well known oral tradition or an actual document that is lost to us. Luke seems to have had the same source as Matthew and Mark, but also some extra information that he decided to include. John, ...


2

The story of turning real water into real wine (most scholars would argue that the wine was real) presumes the moderation of the wedding guests. There is no more reason to think that the guests were drunk then there is reason to think that Jesus feed 5000 gluttons a huge amount of fish and bread. On one hand the story clearly suggests that the guests at a ...


1

Here's the list, in groups of seven, as some translations have it: 1 Jesus - Joseph - Heli - Matthat - Levi - Melchi - Janna 2 Joseph - Mattathiah - Amos - Nahum - Esli - Naggai - Maath 3 Mattathiah - Semei - Joseph - Judah - Joannas - Rhesa - Zerubbabel 4 Shealtiel - Neri - Melchi - Addi - Cosam - Elmodam - Er 5 Jose - Eliezer - Jorim - Matthat ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible