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8

It seems that most of the commentaries take "at home" to mean Peter's home from Mark 1:29, which seems to have functioned as the base for Jesus' ministry in Capernaum. While both follow this majority opinion, J. Marcus allows that "en oikō̧" could simply mean "in a house" and R. Stein states the possibility that it is Jesus' own home. However, given that the ...


5

It depends on what one sees as the point of fulfilling the Old Testament prophecies. If you mean "is the only reason to ride a donkey because it matches the prophecy" as being a formulaic fulfillment then perhaps one has to expand the understanding of why the prophecy exists. The prophecy doesn't just identify the mode of transport, it also says something. ...


4

We can only take the literal meaning of the word of the word we find in the text. Wherever a word can have two meanings it should generally be read as normally used in the Greek language. The word used in both Matthew and Mark is ἀκρίς which translates as grasshopper.


3

This is not possible, unless (in the first feast, feeding the five thousand) the disciples made a foolish assumption: Mark 6:36: Send them away, that they may go into the country round about, and into the villages, and buy themselves bread: for they have nothing to eat. From that verse, we ought to assume the crowd really did have nothing to eat. Even ...


3

The night is death. Work refers to serving God and doing good works. Jesus, in this passage, senses his own coming death. In the verse after, John 9:5, Jesus says that he is the light of the world as long as he is in the world. Therefore, when he leaves the world (in the sense of his death and ascension), day becomes night. John 6:29 mentions a single ...


3

Let's take both scriptures and look at them. Jn 15:13: Greater love has no one than this: to lay down one's life for one's friends. Mt 5:44,46-47: But I tell you, love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, [..] If you love those who love you, what reward will you get? Are not even the tax collectors doing that? And if you greet ...


3

The word 'Gospel' is never applied to the records of Jesus' life by the Bible its self, rather it seems that the word is used of the message proclaimed, see for example: Matt. 4:23, Matt. 9:35, Matt. 11:5, Matt. 24:14, Matt. 26:13, Mk. 1:1, 14-15, Mk. 13:10, Mk. 14:9, Mk. 16:15, Lk. 4:18, Lk. 7:22, Lk. 9:6, Lk. 20:1, Acts 8:25, Acts 14:7, 21, Acts 15:7, Acts ...


3

There’s more to Jesus’ violent actions in the temple then the exchange rate. Here are three all too often overlooked reasons Jesus cleansed the temple. 1. Jesus as the “Son of David” is the Builder of God’s House In His entrance into Jerusalem on a donkey, Jesus claimed to be like Solomon, the “Son of David,” in his coronation (1 Kings 1) and thus ...


3

Why a kiss? There are certainly far less intimate ways to identify someone. Why was the kiss chosen as their signal? A kiss was a common greeting among friends (cp. Rom. 16:16; 1 Cor. 16:20; 2 Cor. 13:12; 1 Thes. 5:26; 1 Pet. 5:14). Since Judas was one of Jesus' twelve original apostles, they would have shared a vinculum amicitiae, and a kiss would have ...


2

This is purely conjecture, as the text doesn't clearly state, however, we see in the text: "Then he gave them to the disciples, and the disciples gave them to the people", and being that there were 12 disciples, each one was likely to have had bread to spread to the peoples. There may have been a larger bounty, but each disciple could carry only one basket, ...


2

It depends on your definition of gleaning, and what time of year they were doing it. Gleaning is supposed to be done by the poor after the harvesters have gone through the field and gathered in the harvest. From wikipedia: According to the Holiness Code and the Deuteronomic Code of the Torah, farmers should leave the corners of their fields ...


2

Jesus was publicly declaring himself to be the "son of David" and the rightful king of Israel. But there’s an even bigger reason to connect Jesus’ entrance into Jerusalem with his claim to be king than this little prophecy in Zachariah 9. We know that the act of riding a mule into Jerusalem was the sign by which Solomon was proclaimed king of Israel. This ...


2

Short Answer The answer has everything to do with Psalms 2 and Jesus' claim to be king. Judas chose to sarcastically betray Jesus, the "supposed Son of God”, with a kiss. His kiss is deeply ironic. As with the soldiers in the crucifixion, He mocks Jesus in his claim to be the rightful king of Israel. Long Answer When Jesus entered Jerusalem on a donkey, ...


2

The problem is that John 15:13 is out of context. If you look at it in context, what is Jesus talking about? His fellowship with one another. NASB Translation: Note, this is shortly before he even lays down his own life for them at the cross. 12 “This is My commandment, that you love one another, just as I have loved you. 13 Greater love has no one ...


1

It is impossible to answer this question beyond giving a baseless opinion. We have exactly what is in the text and nothing more. Even if we had a tradition to refer to in this matter, it would be nothing more than that - a tradition - and really have no more weight than the opinion of anyone here, because of a lack of information from the text. One thing ...


1

Jesus had walked all the way from Galilee and could indeed walk the final few hours into Jerusalem, but is shown as making a triumphant entry, riding on a donkey. This provides a dramatic introduction to the final stage of Jesus' mission: Jesus' very knowledge that there was a young colt awaiting him in a nearby village, demonstrates his powers (Mark ...


1

We have to understand that the moneychangers and those who sold animals were performing a necessary service for the sacrifices offered in the temple, and were sanctioned by the temple authorities. The role of the moneychangers was to exchange the Roman coinage of Palestine, which was being constantly devalued, for coinage of a fixed value so that sacrificial ...


1

The reconciliation of the four accounts can be understood by knowing the histories of the New Testament gospels. John Dominic Crossan says in The Birth of Christianity, page 109, the theory that the Gospels of Matthew and Luke were actually based on Mark's Gospel is held today by a fairly massive consensus of contemporary critical scholarship. However, ...


1

It reminds me of Jesus telling the seventy in Luke 10 to "greet no-one". One could translate Mark 16:8 as "They fled, speaking to no-one". I think that could mean the women went straight to the disciples without speaking to anyone on the way. They were understandably afraid to tell people on the way because it would produce danger with the authorities to ...


1

Looking at the verses in context, I would say that age is not implied. First, the context is different in each case so I will take them by instance. Matthew 10:23-25 22 and you will be hated by all for my name’s sake... 24 “A disciple is not above his teacher, nor a servant above his master. 25 It is enough for the disciple to be like his ...


1

In addition to several of the meanings of Salt given here in other answers, the word Salary is derived from the latin "salarium" which is associated with Roman soldiers who were paid in salt according to Roman historian Pliny the Elder in Plinius Naturalis Historia XXXI. In this writing he states "[I]n Rome... the soldier's pay was originally salt and the ...



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