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Two creation accounts compared A comparison of the creation story in Genesis 1:1-2:4a with that in Genesis 2:4b-25 raises some interesting contradictions. In the first story, man (and woman) are the last of God's creation, for example after all other animals have been created, whereas in the second story, Adam ('man') is the very first of God's creations ...


5

Regarding Lilith Your question revolves around the discrepancy of details when reading Genesis 1-2 sequentially. In a strictly literal reading of these two texts together, it creates some obvious problems, one of which being the question of when humans, particularly men and women, were created. Some readers came to the idea that because Eve is specifically ...


9

Disclaimer on Perspective For the record, I do not hold to the Documentary Hypothesis (JEDP theory) as another answer here gives as a solution. I believe the Pentateuch was largely (if not perhaps wholly) inscribed by a single inspired author, Moses. As such, the Pentateuch should be looked at as a unity, including Gen 1:1-2:3 in relation to Gen 2:4 and ...


0

Et is a word that is put before the direct object of a verb, and mutates in some cases, e.g. with him, her, etc. However, it seems that it's not always used. For example, if I say "I speak Hebrew" the word et isn't used before the word Ivrit (Hebrew).


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Because Jacob encountered God (YHWH) that Night The Meaning of Face to Face The phrase "face to face" in the Hebrew (פָּנִ֣ים אֶל־פָּנִ֔ים) uses the plural form of the word פָּנֶה (paneh; "face").1 However, it would not necessarily be proper to translate it then "faces to faces," because the word is always found in the plural form in Hebrew.2 This is ...


-1

I'm going to go out on a limb here, because for most readers this is unfamiliar territory. Archaelogists and scholars have long realised that the ancient Israelites were polytheistic - not just occasionally and in rebellion, but systemically. Mark S. Smith says in The Early History of God(p52-53) that a tenth-century cultic stand from the site of Taanach in ...


0

Before we can determine just how Jacob would pay his tithes, we have to examine the entire context of the passage.(Gen. 28:17-22) And he was afraid, and said, How dreadful is this place! this is none other but the house of God, and this is the gate of heaven. 18 And Jacob rose up early in the morning, and took the stone that he had put for his ...


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Israel means Inheritance. The sons of God in heaven are the Elohom, are called 'Principles" they who are responsible to collect the inheritance from Earth(Spiritual Israel in the finalty) ) redeemed through Christ. To this the one who wrestled with the Patriarch Jacob was none else than Michael the Archangel who introduced the name "Israel"


0

At all times any reference to someone's righteousness must be either a relative one, or one as a result of justification (the imputation of fulfilled justice as a result of God's mercy on the sinner). This is due to: Romans 3:9 What then? Are we better than they? Not at all. For we have previously charged both Jews and Greeks that they are all under ...


3

There are three common views on the identity of the 'sons of God' marrying the 'daughters of men' in Genesis 6.1-4: Descendants of Seth married descendants of Cain Nobles married commoners Angels married human women 1. Descendants of Seth married descendants of Cain This view was popularized by Augustine (City of God, chapter 23), and the argument ...


1

It is clear, from the text in Galatians that you quoted, that the seed is Jesus. Jesus Himself clarified how this seed goes from a singular to a plural seed: 23 But Jesus answered them, saying, “The hour has come that the Son of Man should be glorified. 24 Most assuredly, I say to you, unless a grain of wheat falls into the ground and dies, it ...


4

No Blunder at All The word "seed," whether Hebrew or English, is often used in a figurative sense to refer to one descending from another (and not normally to the actual sperm or egg of the parent that is the source of propagation). The word can have a singular or a collective meaning. Even a collective meaning, however, is viewing the individual elements ...


-1

If light equals day, then a day is the period light. A day begins when light begins. A day ends when light ends. Evening and morning are part of a Day. Evening ends a day and morning begins a day. Darkness is the absence of light and is therefore not part of a day. It is stated that God "separated" the light from the darkness, calling the light "day", ...


4

It is not about grammar but about the mystical interpretation of Abraham's seed that both the Hebrew and the Greek scriptures argue according to Pauline theology: He is not laying stress on the particular word used, but on the fact that a singular noun of some kind, a collective term, is employed, where τὰ τέκνα or οἱ ἀπόγονοι for instance might ...


4

I agree in large part with both Niobius's answer and Joseph's answer, but have a particular disagreement with Joseph's that I feel must be noted, and a particular missed opportunity from Niobius's answer to help explain Gen 2:17. My Two Agreements Both answers acknowledge that in not all instances does that phrase refer to actually dying on the same day ...


-3

I believe Adam and Eve were a "picture" or "type" of a man himself. Together they were one unit, but each represented separate parts of man. Adam is man's Spirit which is considered the more dominant or male part who communes or talks directly with God. Eve is man's soul, the more feminine, submissive part and the Spirit's "helper". Notice she does not ...


4

This "answer" contains some additional notes/perspectives to complement the helpful existing answers. I'll briefly comment on: (1) the "dual" ending of the place-name "Mahanaim"; (2) the narrative/literary connections of Gen 32:1-2; and (3) the "two camps" that might be intended. (Plus: bonus! the location of Mahanaim.) N.b. Genesis 32:1-2 in (most) English ...


0

Add to everything that Jesus poses the point that David was excused in eating of the showbread when he was hungry and yet the Pharisees were getting on to Jesus for eating on the Sabbath, by plucking grains. Then Jesus calls himself the Lord of the Sabbath and then Jesus heals a man on the Sabbath to prove this point. The point of Matt.127 is that God is ...


3

This has been an intriguing question to think through. I do believe there are a few clues in the text that lead toward an answer. (All English verse references from ESV, as I believe that is the translation you referenced.) Gen 32:1-2 When Jacob sees the "angels of God" (מַלְאֲכֵ֣י אֱלֹהִ֔ים) he declares, "This is God's camp!" (camp singular). So why does ...


2

In searching the text in the Hebrew Bible I found this Rashi commentary: Mahanaim: Two camps, [one of the angels] outside the land, who came with him up to here, and [one of the angels] of Israel, who came to greet him. — [from Tanchuma Vayishlach 3] This corresponds to vs 4(HB): Jacob sent angels ahead of him to his brother Esau, to the land ...


1

I would say the answer is contained right in both verses. Gen 7:6 says Noah was 600 "when the flood of waters was upon the earth," while 8:13 says "the waters have been dried off the earth" (emphasis added in both verses). The waters cannot be both "upon" and "dried off" at the same time. Gen 7:6 is about a year before 8:13. Update from Comment The Hebrew ...


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The phrase appears not only in Gen 31:42: MT ... אֱלֹהֵי אָבִי אֱלֹהֵי אַבְרָהָם וּפַחַד יִצְחָק ... = ... ʾĕlōhê ʾābî ʾĕlōhê ʾābrāhām ûpaḥad yiṣḥāq ... LXX ... ὁ θεὸς τοῦ πατρός μου Αβρααμ καὶ ὁ φόβος Ισαακ ... = ... ho theos tou patros mou Abraam kai ho phobos Isaak ... but also in a slightly variant form a few verses later, in v. 53: ESV ...


-2

According to the Hebrew there is no "Now". It just says that "Adam knew Eve his wife ...". Hebrew has a different point of viewing the time. It does not say that did not have sex however they not have children. It is true that tha rabbis say that they did have sex. If the commandment to be fruitful was issued before the fall, it implies that they had at ...


3

According to the rabbinical tradition stated in the Medrashim and mentioned in Rashi's commentary on Genesis 3-1, they did have sex in the Garden. In fact, it is related that the Serpent saw them having sex and became jealous, provoking him to bring about The Fall. The Rabbis found a hint to this idea in Genesis 3-1 And the serpent... Which ...


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Frank Luke's answer is clear enough to realize Cain is Adam's son, no question about that. I want to address something else you state: Assuming that Cain is the person that Jesus is referring to I would not assume that, nor would I argue that is correct. I take Jesus's statement as wholly referencing "the Devil" himself (just as the verse states). He ...


11

Satan is the father of Cain in that Cain acted like Satan. Genesis tells us that Adam (literally "the man") fathered Cain and Abel. Genesis 4:1 Now the man had relations with his wife Eve, and she conceived and gave birth to Cain, and she said, "I have gotten a manchild with the help of the LORD." The Hebrew grammar here shows that each step is a ...


3

English of the ESV follows fairly well the order and sense of the Hebrew in v.2, but in v.3 has a better (more literally) ordered and rendered form it could take, something like so: v.2 And on the seventh day God finished his work that he had done, and he rested on the seventh day from all his work that he had done. v.3 [my modified ESV translation] So ...


-3

And what do you do when you stop your hard, intended work and rest? God was obviously contemplating on his miraclous works, that's it. Notice how the text says "and made it holy". "Holy" is a big word. When in the exodus someone broke that holy day he was punished to death. It looks like it is not the point to work itself, but the point of work is to get ...


0

There are three "Sabbath" rests in the Scripture. The first is the seventh day of creation, concerning which the reader is familiar. The second is the land, which the Lord had promised to Abraham. That is, the Lord's promise included rest in the land. Deuteronomy 3:19-21 (NASB) 19 But your wives and your little ones and your livestock (I know that you ...


5

Genesis 2:2 וַיְכַל אֱלֹהִים בַּיֹּום הַשְּׁבִיעִי מְלַאכְתֹּו אֲשֶׁר עָשָׂה וַיִּשְׁבֹּת בַּיֹּום הַשְּׁבִיעִי מִכָּל־מְלַאכְתֹּו אֲשֶׁר עָשָֽׂה׃ The word translated as "rest" in English, is actually the conjugated word from which we get the English word Sabbath, which actually means to "cease doing". וַיִּשְׁבֹּת or by its root: שָׁבַת ...


2

As stated in this realted answer: What does Genesis 3:16 literally say? He is saying that the pain during child birth will be greatly multiplied. He is the one that caused the pain to multiply. In the direct Hebrew he says that He will "greatly multiply" pain in conception: http://biblehub.com/interlinear/genesis/3-16.htm


3

God did cease working on the seventh day, from His creative works. That is to say, everything in existence (i.e., all matter) came into existence at that particular time. Thereafter, however, God began to work in a different manner, even until now, a manner in which man cannot work, as John Chrysostom elaborated in his Homily on the Gospel of John: But ...


0

Simply put, humanly speaking, God never really rested. The Sabbath (Hebrew Shabbat or Shabbas) was made for people, and not vice versa, which Jesus made quite clear (see Mark 2:27 NAS). Careful exegesis and hermeneutics require that we become sensitive to expressions which describe human beings and the human condition, but which when applied to God are ...


0

Abraham and Sarah had one son named Issac. This blessed union, shows the inheritance of Issac from Abraham and Sarah. Abraham's only son in this blessed union between he and Sarah. Ishmael could not share this blessing with Issac because he was not of Abraham and Sarah. This blessing was of Abraham and Sarah. Ishmael and his mother, Hagar had a blessing ...



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