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2

The view one takes on the credibility of the assertion is going to depend largely on one's presuppositions and level of allowance for the Bible text to speak for itself. If the Torah (Law, i.e. "teaching" is the idea in Hebrew, not just the actual commands and prohibitions), which includes Genesis, was formed contra what critical scholars claim, and instead ...


2

With any theory like this its just as credible that the influence goes the other way. The argument that the Sumerians could not influence the Hebrews directly is bunk, in that perhaps they could not directly influence the author of Genesis, but since they would have been contemporary with Abraham they could have influenced the stream of Hebrew thought at an ...


2

"Whereby the world that then was, being overflowed with water, perished:" (2 Peter 3:6 KJV) The key word here is "perished". No one died from a flood before Noah's day. The scripture at Gen. 1:1 describes the earth as being "empty" so there were no people to destroy with floodwater. Also if we look at the context of Peter's word in this verse, we can ...


0

Why not let the New Testament interpret the story? Does Hebrews 11 not give the reason why Cain and Abel get the idea, If Abel offered a far better sacrifice than Cain by FAITH, then obviously God gave that commandment to them on what he wanted? Then comparing the rest of Chapter 11 with the other examples of people doing what God wants them to do gives us a ...


6

My question is: Is there a place in Scripture from which we can draw a dogmatic conclusion as to whether Adam was created as a fully developed man, or as a new born babe? Based on the nature of the literary genre of Genesis, and comparisons of Gen.1-3 with other origin stories of ancient near eastern literature I would say the answer to your ...


7

Good question. While no state of maturity for Adam and Eve at creation is ever explicitly stated in the Bible, there are some texts where we can infer something about their state. Adam is created to work the garden and care for it (Genesis 2:15). He then names the animals (Genesis 2:19, 20). This is not something that an infant could do. Adam and Eve are ...


5

Assuming a literal reading of the text (which is how the hermeneutic I hold takes Genesis), then in one 24 hour period, the 6th day of creation, Adam (and by extension on some of the points, Eve) was:1 Made fully capable of understanding language, as God spoke to them (Gen 1:28; cf. Gen 2:15-17) Made fully capable of sexual reproduction to multiply on the ...


3

While the preceding verse (5) makes reference to Genesis 1:2, verse 6 itself is referring to the flood of Noah's time, note the connecting word 'later' in the CEV (a version produced by the American Bible society): 5 They will say this because they want to forget that long ago the heavens and the earth were made at God’s command. The earth came out of ...


0

This really depends on how you define "Genesis" Many scholars believe that Genesis was sourced from the Enuma Elish which in turn was sourced from the Eridu Genesis. If you consider these first drafts of Genesis, then the answer is Sumerian. The book of Genesis as we have it now is vastly different in terms of meaning and what it is trying to tell us, but ...


3

Two very easy questions. Question one: the answer is Hebrew. Question 2: the word used in Gen. 1:26 is אָדָם (ʼādām, “man”); the word in 1:27 is הָאָדָם (hāʼādām “the man”).


1

The genealogies of the New Testament should be read not for length of peoples' ages - these may very well be inaccurate - but instead for the honor claim that they make. This is also part of a literary device used to divide the structure of Genesis called the toldot formula into 7 parts. Radiometric dating indicates that modern mankind has lived for many ...


2

Short Answer: Based on the textual evidence, it may not be a third usage, but in fact the same as the second usage. In other words, the land (as opposed to the waters or heavens) was formless and void. There are two key pieces of evidence from the text that support this conclusion: Gen. 1:2 does not merely say the earth was formless and void, but also ...


-1

The Idea in Brief Tamar was more righteous than Judah because she recognized the Abrahamic Covenant in the seed of the sons of Jacob. Like Ruth, who later coveted the same seed of promise, Tamar was the line through whom King David was to be born. This hope in the promise of Abraham's Covenant reflected the same righteousness which Abraham had for believing ...


0

The real God is non-physical, therefore it doesn't have gender as we know it, but it has it all as we're his manifestation. It's like all the colors of the rainbow is made of white light. Re: Elohim, it's plural, so it could indicate group of beings, that's why it's "us". Check for further info: Why is Elohim translated as God rather than gods?.


4

There are some helpful reflections in the existing answers, although one flaw affects them all, and it is embedded in the question, as posed, itself... The Meaning of ṢDQ? The flaw is the assumption that Hebrew verb (in Gen 38:26) ṣādaq should be understood here as "righteous", where "righteous" stands for some kind of ethical purity next to holiness ...


9

According to Genesis, Noah's ark was box shaped. At 300 cubits long (450 feet), 50 cubits wide (75 feet), and 30 cubits high (45 feet), the shape is not round. Genesis 6:15-16 And this is the fashion which thou shalt make it of: The length of the ark shall be three hundred cubits, the breadth of it fifty cubits, and the height of it thirty cubits. A ...


2

Tamar was more righteous because she saw the whole situation and Judah did not. She was “at the end of her rope,” in the society in which she lived. She had complied with Judah’s wishes as far as she could; she married two of his sons (Er and Onan), but she was at the point where she didn’t have any options left. It seems clear that Judah wasn’t going to ...


6

Since our goal is to understand what the author of the text meant by what he wrote, it is more helpful to look at how the event is described by the author, in the text than to get hung up on semantic possibilities, ANE discoveries, or personal beliefs. The author clearly meant it to be understood as a global event. In addition to the evidence you already ...


3

You focus on Tamar. But first I would encourage you to focus on Judah. Judah was familiar with the law (as were all players in this family drama.) Yet his two eldest sons were so badly behaved that God struck them down. What does that say about the kind of father (and man) Judah was, that he should have two sons who so displeased the Lord? And why, then, ...


-2

Everyone from Adam to Noah would have seen the ancient dinosaurs that are no longer with us. We know that Job was before Noah due to pangea being mentioned (not by name of course) as well as Behemoths/Leviathans. Some say pangea is a myth while others say the flood broke it up. Neither is true. In the days of Peleg, 200 years AFTER the flood, was the earth ...


-3

Tamar conceived through committing incest with her father-in-law (Gen. 38:6-27). Morally speaking, this was deplorable and ethically speaking, it was awful. Nobody would justify this. In a sense, what Tamar did was not good at all. Nevertheless, she was righteous. The fault was not on her side, but on the side of her father-in-law, Judah, who admitted that ...


0

The Idea in Brief There was an indefinite gap of time between Gen 1:1 and Gen 1:2, in which the prehistoric dinosaurs existed. The picture of salvation in the Christian New Testament suggests that the seven days of creation were seven days of restoration, when the earth was "born again." Therefore the seven days of creation in Genesis describe the ...


1

You must keep in mind that these societies predate any concept of "inalienable rights" or "personal integrity". Whether someone is righteous or not is up to the perception of their peers and chain of patrons (possibly all the way up to God). The god, patron, or public determine on a very subjective case-by-case basis what is right or wrong. Judah was not ...


0

In this passage, God is full of sorrow, or "sorry" and regretful of his choice to make mankind. As we are made in God's image, it is not hard for us to remember painful events of rejection and to understand how God feels. When we break up with a significant other, it can be a painful experience. This does not necessarily mean that you would do things ...


1

The first part of the term "Bene Ha'elohim" simply means sons of. Therefore, the question really revolves around what "elohim" refers to here. There are a couple of things that elohim can refer to. In the Bible, it is typically used to refer to Yahewh (god,) however elohim can also refer to gods; the mighty, great or powerful (so, lords or aristocracy); or ...


0

The Nephilim were simply the children of the Bene Ha'elohim and the daughters of men. The first part of this term simply means sons of. Therefore, the question revolves around what "elohim" refers to here. There are a couple of things that elohim can refer to. In the Bible, it is typically used to refer to Yahewh (god,) however it can also refer to gods; ...


-1

It is doubtful that you will find any wording which would be indicative of a local flood or hints thereof. This however does not mean that local flooding is not what occurred. What you need to remember is that the ancient middle-eastern view of "the whole world" was very limited. It is not as if these people visited, knew about, or even had legends of north ...


1

I think it is clear that the final redactor(s) thought of Elohim as one, and therefore as the sole-one who created mankind (human beings). The phrase 'Let us make...' is a borrowed-motif from other Ancient Near East cultures, and alludes to the concept of a Divine Council (Assembly) - something that the final redactor(s) believed based on the following ...


2

Because in English, it is considered poor grammar not to have subject-verb agreement. From the text of the Pentateuch and Torah as a whole, it is clear that all occurrences of Elohim (plural) and Yahweh (singular) are discussing the same deity. In verses like Deuteronomy 6:4, Literally, this would translate as "Hear and Obey O Israel, the LORD your Gods ...


0

In Rashi's Commentary, he equates the prophecy of Jacob with Samson, who came from the tribe of Dan, Dan will avenge his people, like one, the tribes of Israel. טז. דָּן יָדִין עַמּוֹ כְּאַחַד שִׁבְטֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל: Dan will avenge his people: Heb. יָדִין, will avenge his people from the Philistines, like“When the Lord avenges (יָדִין) His people” ...


0

You might be interested to know that this same question has been discussed here: http://linguistics.stackexchange.com/questions/7048/why-is-edenics-not-recognized-as-a-serious-linguistic-theory/


1

Pauls conversion revelation & vision of the risen Christ 14 And when we were all fallen to the earth, I heard a voice speaking unto me, and saying in the Hebrew tongue, Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou me? it is hard for thee to kick against the pricks. Some have inferred from this that Hebrew might be the native language of Heaven. Acts 26:13 At ...


4

Some argue that Job 40:15:24 mentions Behemoth and Leviathan and that these are dinosaurs, however radiometric dating indicates that most or all dinosaurs died out millions of years before Job. Technically, Crocodiles are Dinosaurs so the answer is "all of them." It is also possible that the Leviathan is a Plesiosaur and this dinosaur is not extinct, but ...


2

As modern day Westerners, we forget that middle-easterners from 2 to 5 thousand years ago had a very different picture of the universe. Reading the Enûma Eliš and Eridu Genesis are very revealing in this regard. Here is a pictographic representation of what these people from long ago would have envisioned the universe: When reading Genesis one, is is most ...


0

After Dan obtained the city of Dan in Judges 18, an idol, made by Micah, was set up in it (Judg. 17:4-5; 18:30-31). At that time God's tabernacle was in Shiloh. But in the city of Dan there was an idol. But after gaining more of Christ, they set up another center of worship. According to the book of Deuteronomy, in the good land there should have been only ...


-1

Morfologically, shamayim is not plural, but dual, i.e. it means a group of two (two heavens). However, it is usually understood as singular (either heaven or heavens in English) with no real indication of dual or plural in the meaning.


3

The word שָׁמָיִם is always plural in Hebrew; there is no singular. (We call this a plurale tantum). Gen. 1:8 has שָׁמָיִם without the article and the next verse has the same word with the definite article. You can translate it literally as “heavens”, or you can paraphrase it with the English singular “heaven”. But to translate it as “heaven” in one verse ...


0

The NET Bible notes address this question directly, spelling out the two alternative interpretations: sn In the beginning. The verse refers to the beginning of the world as we know it; it affirms that it is entirely the product of the creation of God. But there are two ways that this verse can be interpreted: (1) It may be taken to refer to the original ...


7

First let me start with the basic outline of how old various manuscripts are. The Dead Sea Scrolls (in Hebrew) are the oldest manuscripts, and are roughly from between 200BCE and 100CE. Other Hebrew manuscripts are much much later, mostly from the 10th century onward with a little bit of 9th century material. The reason for this is that around that time ...


-1

Bless you for making the endeavor to make this issue, at least biblically, air tight. Genesis unequivocably declares the flood to be worldwide. Add the following to your above list of declarations: the whole of genesis 6-8 pictures a catastrophic global flooding Genesis 9:11 11 I solemnly promise never to send another flood to kill all living creatures ...



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