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Luke 17:3 Take heed to yourselves: If thy brother trespass against thee, rebuke him; and if he repent, forgive him. Greetings James, your last question: But, why do this if Abimelech doesn't even dispute his ownership of the well? This fella Abimelech is the king that took in Abraham's wife as part of his harem. Remember, {Chapter 20} Abraham deceived ...


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Joseph was sold in Egypt to a man who adopted him and later taught him dream interpretation. This man became like a father to Joseph. This man is the moon in joseph's dream.


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It seems that Abraham wants to emphasize that he desires Abimelech's and the Canaanites goodwill. The well symbolizes Abraham's stay in a new land, a land to which he was a stranger previously and whose customs and laws he is not familiar with. The ewes signify his willingness to learn and to conduct himself in a manner acceptable to them. The seizing of the ...


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If you are totally heterosexual and a person of the same sex flirts with you, do you not feel some revulsion? Would it be too far-fetched to believe that the homosexual men of Sodom had no sexual desire for women, indeed were repulsed at the thought, and Lot knew this? How was it, in a city so completely wicked, that Lot's daughters were still virgins, ...


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Most translations say the seven ewes were presented "as a witness". The NET translates this as "legal proof", which would suggest evidence. Abraham didn't intend the livestock as a purchase price, but as a witness to convince the judge that he was the rightful owner. In contrast to the servants of Abimelech who had seized the well without any investment ...


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The Idea in Brief The passage is to be understood in its plain and normal sense. That is, the handmaiden of Rachel was Bilhah, who had borne sons to Jacob on behalf of Rachel. She was thus the surrogate mother of children to Jacob on behalf of Rachel. (Rachel later had her own biological children, Joseph and Benjamin.) When Rachel died at the birth of ...


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I would like to add to what Dick has presented by saying that Jacob did, indeed, esteem Joseph as lord. Following Jacob's interpretation of Joseph's dream, Genesis records: And his brothers envied him, but his father kept the matter in mind. -- Genesis 37:11 In fact, Jacob kept the matter in mind his entire life. Towards the end of Jacob's life, ...


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In the Word Biblical Commentary, Volume 2: Genesis 16-50 by Dr. Gordon J. Wenham, the author notes: “Shaul” is the name of another man in 36:37–38. And, indeed, Genesis 36:37-3 states in a list of "kings who reigned in the land of Edom before any king ruled over the Israelites" (Genesis 36:31): When Samlah died, Shaul from Rehoboth on the River ...


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Some people believe there is a relationship between the Joseph's dream and Revelation 12:1: A great sign appeared in heaven: a woman clothed with the sun, with the moon under her feet and a crown of twelve stars on her head*. If Revelation 12:1 is a reference for the birth of the last tribe of benjamin that will rule with Christ who came through ...


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I find that even in the first two verses of the 49th chapter that Jacob seemed to foreshadow christ, like as unto Shiloh, in verse 10. My version says "Until Shiloh come, and unto him shall the (gathering) of the people be" Both Jacob and Shiloh were to gather. Jacob gathered the heads of the twelve tribes of Isreal, and Shiloh, was to gather the ...


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Having received no answer from the community, I reached out to Dr. Gary Rendsburg, my former mentor, who currently serves as chair of the Jewish studies department at Rutgers University. It turns out that I was heading in the wrong direction by assuming that the troublesome word is either Hebrew or Aramaic, because it appears to belong to neither language. ...


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In Genesis 37:7-8, Joseph tells his brothers a dream of rule and dominion, in which Joseph, standing supreme as ruler, is paid homage by his self-abasing brothers. Of course, they are angry at this, from a younger brother. Leon R. Kass points out, in The Beginning of Wisdom, page 517, the phrase "even more” that describes how much they hate Joseph, is a play ...


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It is quite arguable that the reason Abraham bound Isaac was to simply ensure that Isaac wouldn't try to escape under the stress of impending death. Pain motivates the individual to withdraw from damaging situations, to protect a damaged body part while it heals, and to avoid similar experiences in the future ...


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The Son of a ‘Canaanitish’ Woman The list of Simeon’s sons in Gen.46:10 states that the last named son, Shaul (or Saul), was “the son of a Canaanite woman”. Shaul’s designation is unique among Simeon’s sons whose mothers are not otherwise identified, unique even among Jacob’s 12 sons and many grandsons named in the family record as they arrived in Egypt ...


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Was this a standard way to prepare a sacrifice? No. The verb used to describe the binding of Isaac is ʿqd, a term used only here in the Hebrew Bible. There are other terms that could be used to describe a similar action, but none of them is used to describe the preparation of the burnt offering, related most elaborately in Leviticus 1.1 There the basic ...


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Process This question is about whether hermeneutical processes can be used to identify possible prophecies in the Old Testament texts. Genesis 49:22-26 is to be used as an example of how to apply any hermeneutical processes. We like to find foreshadowing and prophecies in different Old Testament passages, and Burton Mack says, in Who Wrote the New ...


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A good place to start interpreting this is with the simple meaning of the word dominion. It means authority; the word has never had a connotation of abusive power and exploitation, when used in a neutral context like this. As a Christian, I believe it is completely valid to interpret the meaning of the OT in light of the NT. This means I regard them as one ...


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Based on opinions from several early Torah commentators, it appears that the issue with the earrings had less to do with their use as jewelry, and more to do with their possibly having been used in conjunction with idolatry. Observe that the patriarchal figures themselves wore rings in their body. For example, in Genesis 24:30 Abraham's servant observes ...


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Psalm 118:27 speaks of binding the sacrifice with cords. So yes, it appears to have been somewhat standard to prepare sacrifices by binding them first. Matthew Poole also refers to this in his commentary: and bound Isaac his son, partly, because burnt-offerings were to be bound to the altar; of which see Poole on "Psalms 118:27"; partly, to represent ...


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Contextual and Historical Analysis Two other uses The word עִצָּבוֹן (ʿiṣṣāḇôn) itself is only found 3 times in the Hebrew Scripture, all in Genesis. Here in 3:16, then in 3:17, and finally Gen 5:29.1 The use in Gen 5:29 is actually a clarifying commentary on 3:17. The NKJV (used for all English translations herein) translates 3:17 and 5:29 as: 3:17 ...


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We can not do this by comparing the dates of the oldest extant manuscripts/tablets of Genesis and Enuma Elish, because all we have in both cases are copies of copies. However, we can examine the Enuma Elish story to establish what period is referred to. Leonard W. King (Enuma Elish, pages LXXII-LXXX) says of the actual tablets inscribed with portions of the ...


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The Bible places the Exodus around 1440 BCE and therefore Joseph around 1870 BCE. To be able to speak to the pharaohs and the common Egyptian people, Joseph would have needed to speak either Egyptian or a lingua franca known widely enough to be helpful. The Amarna letters may help in this regard, although they are somewhat later, around 1350 BCE. The ...


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I'm a bit late in this conversation but is it possible that Canaan himself is the culprit considering that he is the "youngest" son of Ham. Laban calls his grandsons "son" when confronting Jacob for not telling him they were leaving. Could Ham have discovered what had happened and intervened? The text says Ham declared to his brothers what had happened. It ...



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