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Gen. 7:6 says that Noah was (literally) ‘the son of 600 years’ ( בן שש מאות שנה) when the flood began. This is an idiom in Hebrew, and in other Semitic languages (e.g. Arabic and Syriac) meaning ‘600 years old’, that is: in the year beginning with his 600th birthday. You can compare the Syriac translation (Pšīttā) of John 8:57, which has ܥܕ݂ܰܟ݁ܺܝܠ ܒ݁ܰܪ ...


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And in thy seed shall all the nations of the earth be blessed, because thou hast hearkened to my voice." Genesis 22:18 LXX kai eneuloghqhsontai en tw spermati sou panta ta eqnh ths ghs anq¢ wn uphkousas ths emhs fwnhs Note the use of the singular seed (spermati) Paul probably has in mind the LXX translation of the verse . Anyway, offspring can be understood ...


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So much depends on punctuation! Yet the Book of Genesis was written before punctuation was developed, allowing us to choose where to put a comma or a colon, thereby changing the meaning. A further difficulty is that many words and phrases do not have exact correspondence from one language to another, so we have to not just translate, but 'interpret'. ...


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In Genesis 5:32, the Hebrew is correctly translated as "And Noah was five hundred years old, and Noah begot Shem, Ham, and Japheth, although some English translations resolve this difficulty by adding the word 'after'." Genesis 11:10 says: "These are the generations of Shem: Shem was an hundred years old, and begat Arphaxad two years after the flood:" As ...


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I think begat simply means to have (Jesus was God's only "begotten" son). I hadn't ever heard anyone say that Shem, Ham, and Japheth were triplets, but it looks like it could be interpreted that way. The NIV is a bit different in its translation though, and simply says "After Noah was 500 years old, he became the father of Shem, Ham and Japheth." That ...


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Yes, it is a good translation. Michael A. Knibb says, in 'Life and death in the Old Testament', published in The World of Ancient Israel: Sociological, Anthropological and Political Perspectives, page 398, the account of the creation of man in the ‘Yahwistic’ narrative of the creation and fall (Gen.2.4b-3.24) epitomises the Old Testament view of the ...


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Hebrew has four words for “you”: masculine singular, masculine plural, feminine singular, feminine plural. If you are addressing a group of people of both sexes you use the masculine plural. In this particular verse there are no pronouns as the person is indicated by the form of the verbs. All three verbs (eat, touch, die) are in the masculine plural form. ...


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Many people think the Genesis ages are chosen to be numbers that people could easily remember, and some are. The reason for this is no doubt that many of the traditions that came to be recorded in the Bok of Genesis were initially handed down orally by tradents, who used a variety of techniques to help them remember the stories, including poetry, numbers ...


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Genesis 1:1-2, in fact, can be equally translated in two ways; by taking the Hebrew word 'b-reishit' either as a 'construct' or in the 'absolute'. This fact, in itself, renders the possibility of translating the first two verses (Gensis 1:1-2) into two strikingly different but equally valid translations. These two equally valid translations in turn give us ...


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Jacob is using this phrase when talking to Laban while his father, Isaac is still alive, but after the death of Abraham. According to Rashi, and the Fear of Isaac: He did not wish to say, “the God of Isaac,” because the Holy One, blessed be He, does not associate His name with the righteous while they are alive. Although He said to him upon his ...


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Since Genesis doesn't show how old Abraham's son/boy Isaac was at that time, all we could do to determine that is calculate his age then. However, we would need to have some other information, such as someone else’s age at the time, along with how much older or younger than Isaac that individual was. Isaac was born to Abraham at 100 years old, Sarah was to ...


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The Idea in Brief When viewed through the lens of Jewish tradition, the suggested literal translation of the verse would appear as follows: Gen 2:12 And gold of the land is good: there [one finds] the yellow and the red stone. The second clause (after the colon) would modify and expand upon the first clause. In this regard, the Babylonian Talmud ...



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