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I would like to connect the words שק נשק משק [שק] is translated as "sack cloth" in your English Bibles. However, I would like to propose that [שק] more akin to cheap fabrics used as undergarments such as loincloth. Therefore, [שק] is material/entity that is close/intimate to you out of convenience. Someone or something conveniently place in intimacy. ...


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It's worth reading Gesenius's interpretation of מֶשֶׁק here. He identifies מֶשֶׁק (mesheq) with מֶשֶׁךְ (meshek - defined here) in its meaning of "possession." He views the unusual form of מֶשֶׁק, with a koph instead of a caph for the first letter, as a pun ("paronomasia") to go with with דַּמֶּשֶׂק (Dammeseq), "Damascus." Gesenius rejects the ...


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St. Athanasius commented on this, in ‘Discourse IV Against the Arians’, indicating the two different words are used as synonyms in a sense, since the sacrifice of Isaac was a prefiguration of the Crucifixion of Christ (emphasis added): [M]uch is said in the Old [Testament]...about the Son, as in the second Psalm, ‘Thou art My Son, this day have I ...


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The division of waters As v8 says the expanse in the 'heaven' we cannot take the expanse to refer to land. It is worth noting that some translations use the word 'sky' rather then 'Heaven' here. For example: NIB Genesis 1:8 God called the expanse "sky". And there was evening, and there was morning--the second day. NET Genesis 1:8 God called the ...


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It is my opinion that Abel kept flocks for all the practical reasons of milk, clothing and yes, meat. A diet of vegetation alone does not provide sufficient protein. But, of course the story is that Cain and Abel apparently became of 'accountable' age at the same time. Did Abel, apparently 'out of the blue' decide that the animals would be an acceptable ...


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Yes. The King James Bible (KJV) actually translates this as 'firmament', and the Catholic New American Bible (NAB) says 'dome' in Genesis 1:6-7: KJV: And God said, Let there be a firmament in the midst of the waters, and let it divide the waters from the waters. And God made the firmament, and divided the waters which were under the firmament from the ...


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Genesis 11 is going back and detailing a story that clarifies Genesis 10. Why so many languages? In Genesis 10:5, 20 and 31 we are told that the descendents of each of Noah's sons moved on, "each with his own language, by their clans, in their nations." All being from the same family it would seem odd that they each had their own language so quickly. ...


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Some time ago, I did a generation by generation analysis of the key figures in Genesis and arrived at a similar answer. Genesis 11:10 says Shem was 100 years old when he begat Arphaxad. Continuing with the following generations: Arphaxad begat Salah when he was 35 years old (11:12); Salah begat Eber when he was 30 years old (11:14); Eber begat Peleg when he ...


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At least one other reason for keeping flocks in addition to other answers here is so that sacrifices could be made. In Genesis 4:4, it is recorded that Abel offered a sacrifice from his flock. This provides us some important clues. From the same passage, we know that Cain offered a grain offering (4:3). Based on the fact that this was offered "at the ...


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In Gen 10:8-10 we read: Cush begot Nimrod; he began to be a mighty one on the earth. He was a mighty hunter before the LORD; therefore it is said, "Like Nimrod the mighty hunter before the LORD." And the beginning of his kingdom was Babel, Erech, Accad, and Calneh, in the land of Shinar.[NKJV] Notice that we are told that the kingdom of Nimrod ...


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Yes, only after Gen 9:3 did God expressed clearly that human may eat meat after they took the life of the animal. Though we can argue that the violent-ness of mankind on Noah's time (Gen 6) included some bloody deeds, like gulping down living animal. Still, it is reasonable to concludes that Adam and family ate only vegetables, as God also ordered him of ...


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Abraham's case Genesis 12 states very clearly that Abram (before renamed to Abraham) was called from his country (or land, v.1). Remember that previously in chapter 11 Terah went out from Ur of the Chaldeans with his children, to Haran. Back to chapter 12, God said that He will give the land to Abram's offspring (v.7). God expresses His ownership of the ...


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Your difficulties in translating Genesis 22:8 and 22:14 are a result of insisting on a certain English translation which may not consistently capture the meaning of the entire passage. The verb ראה usually means "see" or something closely related to seeing. According to Strong's Concordance, the only instance where the verb ראה means "provide" other than ...


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It is sometimes hard to discern material from the Elohist source apart from that by the Yahwist source, but in this instance, Norman C. Habel says that the main narrative is usually attributed to the Elohist and that the appendix in verses 22:15-18 appears to belong to the Yahwist (Literary Criticism of the Old Testament, page 56). As the Elohist and the ...


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Revelation 22:5 Mentions that God is the source of light in heaven: There will be no more night. They will not need the light of a lamp or the light of the sun, for the Lord God will give them light. This indicates that it is possible for God himself to be a source of light. When God said "Let there be light" in Genesis 1:3, he doesn't specify a ...


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I think you may be reading this passage without its' goal in mind. The point of the creation story is not to record the exact scientific sequence of creation in a journalistic manner - but instead to teach the people of Israel an important lesson about God. This is not a recipe for creation with the exact ingredients, measurements and baking instructions for ...


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Without researching this at the moment, the simple answer is that although Cain was a murderer, killing him wantonly would also be murder. If G-d had wanted him dead, G-d could have arranged that, no?


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6 day creationists would say that your assertion that the light of the first day was figurative has nothing going for it. Indeed, I'd like to hear what arguments you have for that. In any case, if the days were approximately as long as our days, plants can survive for one day in darkness.


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The Raven is a deep mythological Bird and appears in cultures from Tibet to Greece have seen the raven as a messenger for the gods. Celtic goddesses of warfare often took the form of ravens during battles. The Viking god, Odin, had two ravens, Hugin (thought) and Munin (memory), which flew around the world every day and reported back to Odin every night ...


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For those of us who take the first creation account in Genesis (Genesis 1:1-2:4a) literally, every apparent contradiction has an explanation. Perhaps not one that will satisfy the scientist or the sceptic, but one that will satisfy the believer. Simply put, God chose to create another light source on day 1, in verse 1:3, and chose to have it darken on a ...


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I agree with Ron that most of the other 20+ translations have it wrong, but so does he. Remember that Genesis says the river went out of the Park of Eden and split into four heads. This tells us the terrain was FLAT. Also, a mist was able to water the face of the earth. Also flat. This was "pangea"--one large continent. When Genesis 7:19 says "high ...



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