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ותצחק שרה and laughing Sarah בקרבה within herself לאמר to say אחרי בלתי after I am without/lack היתה לי her-exist/become of me עדנה her-make-pleasure ואדני זקן and my lord-husband is bearded/old You should simply read the passage at its face value. Sarah laughing within herself to say, after I lack/lose my liveliness, have pleasure and my ...


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As several of the comments have already noted, there are parallels for this in other languages, including English. When we talk (figuratively) to ourselves we do say things like “let’s go”, “allons-y”, “gehen wir”. The underlying idea is that when we talk to ourselves we are in effect splitting ourselves in half, with one of our two personae addressing the ...


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The Hebrew word for man is אָדָם (adam) or אּישׁ (ish). The "out of man" (מֵאִ֖ישׁ meish, also transliterated me’iysh) in this passage derives from the latter form. Like in Gen 2:23, ish often carries a definite connection with males (as opposed to "mankind"), but has a variety of uses. You can explore the usage of all forms of ish here and meish here. ...


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Leon R. Kass has examined this text and sees the Ishmaelites and Midianites as quite separate ethnic groups, as do most other commentators. In The Beginning of Wisdom: Reading Genesis at page 523, Kass says that Verse 28 is somewhat ambiguous and that later verses seem to disagree on who – the Midianites or the Ishmaelites – actually sold Joseph into Egypt: ...


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Yes, there is likely an allusion here. I had trouble finding many commentators who discuss even the possibility of an allusion. In fact, the sole mention I could find came from Luke Timothy Johnson's volume on Luke in the Sacra Pagina series. Almost in passing he writes: The phrase echoes the biblical language used of Adam and Eve in Gen 3:7, "the eyes ...



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