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11

Satan is the father of Cain in that Cain acted like Satan. Genesis tells us that Adam (literally "the man") fathered Cain and Abel. Genesis 4:1 Now the man had relations with his wife Eve, and she conceived and gave birth to Cain, and she said, "I have gotten a manchild with the help of the LORD." The Hebrew grammar here shows that each step is a ...


10

Frank Luke's answer is clear enough to realize Cain is Adam's son, no question about that. I want to address something else you state: Assuming that Cain is the person that Jesus is referring to I would not assume that, nor would I argue that is correct. I take Jesus's statement as wholly referencing "the Devil" himself (just as the verse states). He ...


5

The phrase appears not only in Gen 31:42: MT ... אֱלֹהֵי אָבִי אֱלֹהֵי אַבְרָהָם וּפַחַד יִצְחָק ... = ... ʾĕlōhê ʾābî ʾĕlōhê ʾābrāhām ûpaḥad yiṣḥāq ... LXX ... ὁ θεὸς τοῦ πατρός μου Αβρααμ καὶ ὁ φόβος Ισαακ ... = ... ho theos tou patros mou Abraam kai ho phobos Isaak ... but also in a slightly variant form a few verses later, in v. 53: ESV ...


5

Genesis 2:2 וַיְכַל אֱלֹהִים בַּיֹּום הַשְּׁבִיעִי מְלַאכְתֹּו אֲשֶׁר עָשָׂה וַיִּשְׁבֹּת בַּיֹּום הַשְּׁבִיעִי מִכָּל־מְלַאכְתֹּו אֲשֶׁר עָשָֽׂה׃ The word translated as "rest" in English, is actually the conjugated word from which we get the English word Sabbath, which actually means to "cease doing". וַיִּשְׁבֹּת or by its root: שָׁבַת ...


4

I agree in large part with both Niobius's answer and Joseph's answer, but have a particular disagreement with Joseph's that I feel must be noted, and a particular missed opportunity from Niobius's answer to help explain Gen 2:17. My Two Agreements Both answers acknowledge that in not all instances does that phrase refer to actually dying on the same day ...


4

This "answer" contains some additional notes/perspectives to complement the helpful existing answers. I'll briefly comment on: (1) the "dual" ending of the place-name "Mahanaim"; (2) the narrative/literary connections of Gen 32:1-2; and (3) the "two camps" that might be intended. (Plus: bonus! the location of Mahanaim.) N.b. Genesis 32:1-2 in (most) English ...


4

No Blunder at All The word "seed," whether Hebrew or English, is often used in a figurative sense to refer to one descending from another (and not normally to the actual sperm or egg of the parent that is the source of propagation). The word can have a singular or a collective meaning. Even a collective meaning, however, is viewing the individual elements ...


4

It is not about grammar but about the mystical interpretation of Abraham's seed that both the Hebrew and the Greek scriptures argue according to Pauline theology: He is not laying stress on the particular word used, but on the fact that a singular noun of some kind, a collective term, is employed, where τὰ τέκνα or οἱ ἀπόγονοι for instance might ...


3

Because Jacob encountered God (YHWH) that Night The Meaning of Face to Face The phrase "face to face" in the Hebrew (פָּנִ֣ים אֶל־פָּנִ֔ים) uses the plural form of the word פָּנֶה (paneh; "face").1 However, it would not necessarily be proper to translate it then "faces to faces," because the word is always found in the plural form in Hebrew.2 This is ...


3

This has been an intriguing question to think through. I do believe there are a few clues in the text that lead toward an answer. (All English verse references from ESV, as I believe that is the translation you referenced.) Gen 32:1-2 When Jacob sees the "angels of God" (מַלְאֲכֵ֣י אֱלֹהִ֔ים) he declares, "This is God's camp!" (camp singular). So why does ...


3

The first thing we need to understand is that the Hebrew word מַלְאָךְ (mal'akh) literally means "messenger." It can refer to human messengers (Hag. 1:13) as well as spiritual messengers (Gen. 22:11; the latter is what we commonly refer to as "angels"). A related noun מַלְאָכוּת (mal'akhut) derived from the same triliteral root מל"ך means "message" (Hag. ...


3

According to the rabbinical tradition stated in the Medrashim and mentioned in Rashi's commentary on Genesis 3-1, they did have sex in the Garden. In fact, it is related that the Serpent saw them having sex and became jealous, provoking him to bring about The Fall. The Rabbis found a hint to this idea in Genesis 3-1 And the serpent... Which ...


3

God did cease working on the seventh day, from His creative works. That is to say, everything in existence (i.e., all matter) came into existence at that particular time. Thereafter, however, God began to work in a different manner, even until now, a manner in which man cannot work, as John Chrysostom elaborated in his Homily on the Gospel of John: But ...


3

English of the ESV follows fairly well the order and sense of the Hebrew in v.2, but in v.3 has a better (more literally) ordered and rendered form it could take, something like so: v.2 And on the seventh day God finished his work that he had done, and he rested on the seventh day from all his work that he had done. v.3 [my modified ESV translation] So ...


2

As stated in this realted answer: What does Genesis 3:16 literally say? He is saying that the pain during child birth will be greatly multiplied. He is the one that caused the pain to multiply. In the direct Hebrew he says that He will "greatly multiply" pain in conception: http://biblehub.com/interlinear/genesis/3-16.htm


2

In searching the text in the Hebrew Bible I found this Rashi commentary: Mahanaim: Two camps, [one of the angels] outside the land, who came with him up to here, and [one of the angels] of Israel, who came to greet him. — [from Tanchuma Vayishlach 3] This corresponds to vs 4(HB): Jacob sent angels ahead of him to his brother Esau, to the land ...


2

There are three common views on the identity of the 'sons of God' marrying the 'daughters of men' in Genesis 6.1-4: Descendants of Seth married descendants of Cain Nobles married commoners Angels married human women 1. Descendants of Seth married descendants of Cain This view was popularized by Augustine (City of God, chapter 23), and the argument ...


1

It is clear, from the text in Galatians that you quoted, that the seed is Jesus. Jesus Himself clarified how this seed goes from a singular to a plural seed: 23 But Jesus answered them, saying, “The hour has come that the Son of Man should be glorified. 24 Most assuredly, I say to you, unless a grain of wheat falls into the ground and dies, it ...


1

I would say the answer is contained right in both verses. Gen 7:6 says Noah was 600 "when the flood of waters was upon the earth," while 8:13 says "the waters have been dried off the earth" (emphasis added in both verses). The waters cannot be both "upon" and "dried off" at the same time. Gen 7:6 is about a year before 8:13. Update from Comment The Hebrew ...



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