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8

The "two" in some translations is an interpretative addition. It does not exist in the Hebrew of Gen 18:22, which is simply הָֽאֲנָשִׁ֔ים ("the men"). The word "two" is added in those translations for "clarity" (which clarity can inadvertently create confusion, such as evidenced in your question). The idea is added because it is understood by many ...


6

OP asks: I assume we have conflicting translation sources - what would be the best translation? Not exactly "conflicting translation sources": all the modern versions are working with the same sources, but drawing different conclusions about how that source text is best rendered. As ever, we need to set out those texts first of all, i.e. the first ...


5

Not Sure One Can Give a Dogmatic Answer, But... Scripture does not ever give a total number of Lot's daughters. Indeed, the plural "sons-in-law" does not even need to imply two, so (assuming they were married, not just engaged) it could also be that Lot had more than four daughters, two at home and however many were married. However, BDB states that the ...


5

You do realise (I trust) that the verb bārakh “to bless” is not actually the same word as the noun bεrεkh “knee”, though they are written the same in unvocalised Hebrew script. But, historically they do seem to belong to the same root. In most Semitic languages the verb b-r-k means “to bow down to, praise, bless” (said of a man/woman praising/blessing a ...


4

I have searched various Lexicons but there seems no clear connection between kneeling and blessing other then a general religious sense of the kneeling posture. However if we look at this good summary of uses of the word below we could trace a plausible link. bless = bestow power for success, prosperity, fertility: animals Gn 1:22, men 1:28, 7th day ...


3

There is no significance from the grammar with the change. According to Bruce Waltke1, though the noun yom in Genesis 1:5 lacks a definite article it should be treated as a definite noun. Following that statement, he says that the cardinal number echad ("one") should be treated as an ordinal wherever it modifies a definite noun (which in Hebrew would ...


3

My Hebrew is basic, but I do read Greek. Sarah refers to Abraham as her kurios in Genesis 18:12 in the Septuagint (the Greek Old Testament.) Yet she does not address him directly with that word in her commentary of 1 Peter, Karen Jobes (2005:205) notes that "This noun [kurios] is the only lexical connection between the story of Sarah and Peter’s claim.” ...


2

It is doubtfully a question of translation sources as the Masoretic Text (commonly abbreviated MT) supplies the base of almost all English translations from Hebrew. Other translations and versions will be examined, especially ancient ones, but translators going from Hebrew start with the MT. (Obviously a translation of the Septuagint into English will use ...


2

The famous Jewish biblical commentator Rashi finds the choice of words very significant. He writes: According to the sequence of the language of the chapter, it should have been written, “the first day,” as it is written regarding the other days, “second, third, fourth.” Why did Scripture write “one”? Because the Holy One, blessed be He, was the only ...


2

The Bible does not explicitly say "two men" at Gen. 18:22, simply saying "the men" (האנשים). The translators, like the rabbis, infer that two men were there because of the transition at Gen. 19:1 ("And the two angels came to Sodom..."). Rashi, citing the Jewish tradition recorded in the Babylonian Talmud at Bava Metzia 86b) reflects that there were three ...


1

There is a connection! The common root of the noun for knee (berek) and the verb to bless (baruch) is ברן. We see the root in action when Eliezer comes to look for a wife for Isaac (Gen. 24:11), and comes to the well where he causes his camels to kneel down to drink after he sees Rebecca. The word used there is, "Vi'yavrach" (a derivative of "baruch") ...


1

I think the simple reason for that this plural noun is translated into other languages as a singular noun is because it's being used with a singular verb. This would be comparable to saying "Ants is here to stay" instead of "Ants are here to stay". It turns this plural word ("ants") into a proper noun. In the Hebrew Bible Elohim, when meaning the God of ...


1

You have a very interesting question, David. I am not an expert but only a continuing student of the scripture. My answer is solely based on the light of my understanding of other clear verses of scripture. Ge 1:1 In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. NKJV Ex 20:11 11 For in six days the LORD made the heavens and the earth, the sea, and ...


1

The creation account in Genesis is describing cosmic events in terms that ordinary men and women could understand. It is best taken as a straightforward historical account of the events of creation. If this is the case, then the first day began at the start, the beginning. It couldn't start at the end of the day because this was the beginning of time. The ...



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